fbpx
skip to Main Content

Greece

Dates

May 22 – June 26, 2021

Subjects

Classics, English, History, Political Science

Deadlines

Dec. 1: Apply Early & Save $100
Feb. 15: Regular Deadline 

Program Overview

Greece, a country of dramatic natural beauty and rich cultural traditions, provides students a true adventure as they learn about the ancient peoples whose literature, political ideas, philosophy, notions of health and well-being, religion, art and architecture continue to shape our lives. The program will begin in Athens and will travel to celebrated Greek cities and islands including Olympia, Mykonos, Naxos, Milos, Delphi and more. Note: Students should be aware that some excursions are physically strenuous and involve hiking over rocky terrain.

Language Requirement: None. All courses are taught in English. 

Accommodations: Hotel, 3-5 people per room.

OrientationMandatory orientation on Saturday, April 17 in Bowling Green, KY. See Orientation for more information.

Courses

All courses are taught in English and are 3 credit hours. You may enroll in 1-2 courses.

ENG 339 Topics: Women in Modern Greek Literature

Dr. Jill Parrott

In this class, we will explore how contemporary women are writing in and are represented in contemporary Greek literature (in translation) and literature about modern Greece. Students will read in several genres including memoir, novel, and poetry. Through these texts, they will learn more about contemporary Greek history, politics, culture, social issues, language, and the Greek diaspora through the lens of gender.

ENG 349 Topics: Travel Writing on the Road to Athens

Dr. Jill Parrott and Dr. Jeffrey Rice

An introductory study of the travel writing genre. Students will study prominent travel writers and guides like Pausanias, Mark Twain, Samantha Brown, and Anthony Bourdain, and use their insights to write their own thematically-based travel guides. Special attention will be paid to how Greece’s history, culture, and natural beauty can be best represented to the international tourist.

ENG 396 Mythology

Dr. Richard King

No stories contain greater richness and depth, and none have been more influential, than those we call “Greek myths.” Students learn to read the manifestations of myth in sculpture and vases as well as selections from ancient texts. We visit the Athenian Acropolis, Eleusis, Delos, Argos, and Mycenae, the very settings in which the mythological episodes take place.

ENG 399 Topics: Plato's Lives: Rhetoric and Philosophy in Ancient Greece

Dr. Jeffrey Rice

An introductory study of ancient Greek rhetoric, otherwise known as the philosophic study of persuasion. Students will read authors such as Plato, Aristotle, Hippocrates, Lysias, and Gorgias, and consider how rhetoric and philosophy influence the way we think, communicate and ultimately relate to one another today.

HIST 490 Topics: Day to Day in Ancient Greece

Dr. Christine Shea

This course explores the ordinary lives of ancient Greeks— and of the Romans, Jews, and Christians who lived near them— as we wander their towns and poke our noses into what remains of their homes, temples, stores, streets.

PS 460 Topics: Ancient Greek Political Thought

Dr. Thomas Bunting

How does ancient Greek political thought inform contemporary understandings of key political concepts like democracy, power, and justice? This course examines how ancient writers, primarily Plato, grappled with these questions and many more.

PS 460 Topics: Greek Entertainments and Politics

Dr. Thomas Bunting

What is the relationship between comedy and politics in the ancient world? This course examines the plays of Aristophanes to see how comedy is the site of political critique, a source of community, a response to political philosophy, and more.

All KIIS course credit is awarded by Western Kentucky University. Prior to your KIIS program, please speak with your home campus academic advisor and/or study abroad office to determine course equivalencies. Grades will be transferred to your home institution in mid-August after the completion of the program. Course offerings are subject to change according to enrollment. For more information, visit Transcripts & Grades.

Program Excursions

In the 36 full days we spend in Greece, we visit more than 20 museums and more than 30 archaeological sites, where students can expect to refine their understanding of Western arts, social structures, political and religious institutions, and values.

Santorini (Independent/Optional)

Students have the option of a “Spring Break” on the island of Santorini which is known for its breathtaking sunsets and the volcanic activity that shaped the island. With its iconic whitewashed buildings and blue dome top roofs, students won’t want to miss out.

Delphi and Olympia

Students will be able to concretize their academic work when we go to Delphi, home of Apollo, one of the holiest places on earth, and Olympia, birthplace of the great games and showplace of Western values of competition and wellbeing.

The Islands

The Aegean islands introduce students to the rich varieties of Greek life, ancient and modern.  Mykonos, the honeymooners’ delight; the ghost island Delos; Naxos, island of Dionysos; Milos, where the Venus de Milo was found; friendly Sifnos; and, in an optional side trip, Santorini.

Nauplion

Nauplion, the first capital of modern Greece, is our home base in the Peloponnese, the southern peninsula of Greece.  This magnificent port city, important since the Trojan War, serves as the base of operations for our exploration of Mycenae, home of King Agamemnon; Argos, with its magnificent theater; Nemea, home of the Nemean Games; Epidauros and the sanctuary/health resort of the healing god Asclepius.

Athens

In Athens we sample the glorious monuments of the classical city, such as the Parthenon, the Temple of Hephaistos, or the Theater of Dionysos, as well as the grand projects of the Romans, such as Hadrian’s Library or the Temple of Olympian Zeus.  From Athens we make our way to Eleusis, the home of the mysteries of the Great Mother; to Corinth, where St. Paul preached; and to Perachora and the sanctuary of Hera.

What's Included

Program Cost: $5,475 + airfare

Earn up to 6 Credit Hours

Group Flight (Optional)

Airport Transfers in Athens

Accommodations

Breakfast

Groups Excursions & Transport

Security Evacuation Protection

Medical Insurance

Program Director & Faculty
on-site 24/7

To help you budget, keep in mind that you are responsible for the cost of obtaining a passport ($145), two meals per day + personal expenses (approx. $600-$1200 depending on your food tastes/spending habits/optional independent travel preferences), ISIC card (required, $25), any class readings/materials, and any fees from your college/university.

Although KIIS tries to foresee all possible expenses in formulating program fees, please note that dramatic fluctuations in foreign currency valuations and/or airline surcharges may affect the total cost of the program.

Group Flight

Estimated Cost: $1,750 – $1,850

The Greece program offers a group flight option where you can travel to/from Athens, Greece with other students and faculty. If you choose this option, KIIS will purchase a round-trip flight ticket for you. The flight cost will be added to your final program fee on April 1. The group flight will depart from Cincinnati or Louisville.

If not selecting the group flight, you are responsible to purchase your own roundtrip airfare.

The flight to Greece is overnight arriving the following morning. On the return, the flight from Greece  to the USA departs and arrives on the same day.Visit Flights and Passports & Visas for more information.

Student Voices

Take Your Education Further

Description

Dates

May 22 – June 26, 2021

Subjects

Classics, English, History, Political Science

Deadlines

Dec. 1: Apply Early & Save $100
Feb. 15: Regular Deadline 

Program Overview

Greece, a country of dramatic natural beauty and rich cultural traditions, provides students a true adventure as they learn about the ancient peoples whose literature, political ideas, philosophy, notions of health and well-being, religion, art and architecture continue to shape our lives. The program will begin in Athens and will travel to celebrated Greek cities and islands including Olympia, Mykonos, Naxos, Milos, Delphi and more. Note: Students should be aware that some excursions are physically strenuous and involve hiking over rocky terrain.

Language Requirement: None. All courses are taught in English. 

Accommodations: Hotel, 3-5 people per room.

OrientationMandatory orientation on Saturday, April 17 in Bowling Green, KY. See Orientation for more information.

Courses

All courses are taught in English and are 3 credit hours. You may enroll in 1-2 courses.

ENG 339 Topics: Women in Modern Greek Literature

Dr. Jill Parrott

In this class, we will explore how contemporary women are writing in and are represented in contemporary Greek literature (in translation) and literature about modern Greece. Students will read in several genres including memoir, novel, and poetry. Through these texts, they will learn more about contemporary Greek history, politics, culture, social issues, language, and the Greek diaspora through the lens of gender.

ENG 349 Topics: Travel Writing on the Road to Athens

Dr. Jill Parrott and Dr. Jeffrey Rice

An introductory study of the travel writing genre. Students will study prominent travel writers and guides like Pausanias, Mark Twain, Samantha Brown, and Anthony Bourdain, and use their insights to write their own thematically-based travel guides. Special attention will be paid to how Greece’s history, culture, and natural beauty can be best represented to the international tourist.

ENG 396 Mythology

Dr. Richard King

No stories contain greater richness and depth, and none have been more influential, than those we call “Greek myths.” Students learn to read the manifestations of myth in sculpture and vases as well as selections from ancient texts. We visit the Athenian Acropolis, Eleusis, Delos, Argos, and Mycenae, the very settings in which the mythological episodes take place.

ENG 399 Topics: Plato's Lives: Rhetoric and Philosophy in Ancient Greece

Dr. Jeffrey Rice

An introductory study of ancient Greek rhetoric, otherwise known as the philosophic study of persuasion. Students will read authors such as Plato, Aristotle, Hippocrates, Lysias, and Gorgias, and consider how rhetoric and philosophy influence the way we think, communicate and ultimately relate to one another today.

HIST 490 Topics: Day to Day in Ancient Greece

Dr. Christine Shea

This course explores the ordinary lives of ancient Greeks— and of the Romans, Jews, and Christians who lived near them— as we wander their towns and poke our noses into what remains of their homes, temples, stores, streets.

PS 460 Topics: Ancient Greek Political Thought

Dr. Thomas Bunting

How does ancient Greek political thought inform contemporary understandings of key political concepts like democracy, power, and justice? This course examines how ancient writers, primarily Plato, grappled with these questions and many more.

PS 460 Topics: Greek Entertainments and Politics

Dr. Thomas Bunting

What is the relationship between comedy and politics in the ancient world? This course examines the plays of Aristophanes to see how comedy is the site of political critique, a source of community, a response to political philosophy, and more.

All KIIS course credit is awarded by Western Kentucky University. Prior to your KIIS program, please speak with your home campus academic advisor and/or study abroad office to determine course equivalencies. Grades will be transferred to your home institution in mid-August after the completion of the program. Course offerings are subject to change according to enrollment. For more information, visit Transcripts & Grades.

Program Excursions

In the 36 full days we spend in Greece, we visit more than 20 museums and more than 30 archaeological sites, where students can expect to refine their understanding of Western arts, social structures, political and religious institutions, and values.

Santorini (Independent/Optional)

Students have the option of a “Spring Break” on the island of Santorini which is known for its breathtaking sunsets and the volcanic activity that shaped the island. With its iconic whitewashed buildings and blue dome top roofs, students won’t want to miss out.

Delphi and Olympia

Students will be able to concretize their academic work when we go to Delphi, home of Apollo, one of the holiest places on earth, and Olympia, birthplace of the great games and showplace of Western values of competition and wellbeing.

The Islands

The Aegean islands introduce students to the rich varieties of Greek life, ancient and modern.  Mykonos, the honeymooners’ delight; the ghost island Delos; Naxos, island of Dionysos; Milos, where the Venus de Milo was found; friendly Sifnos; and, in an optional side trip, Santorini.

Nauplion

Nauplion, the first capital of modern Greece, is our home base in the Peloponnese, the southern peninsula of Greece.  This magnificent port city, important since the Trojan War, serves as the base of operations for our exploration of Mycenae, home of King Agamemnon; Argos, with its magnificent theater; Nemea, home of the Nemean Games; Epidauros and the sanctuary/health resort of the healing god Asclepius.

Athens

In Athens we sample the glorious monuments of the classical city, such as the Parthenon, the Temple of Hephaistos, or the Theater of Dionysos, as well as the grand projects of the Romans, such as Hadrian’s Library or the Temple of Olympian Zeus.  From Athens we make our way to Eleusis, the home of the mysteries of the Great Mother; to Corinth, where St. Paul preached; and to Perachora and the sanctuary of Hera.

What's Included

Program Cost: $5,475 + airfare

Earn up to 6 Credit Hours

Group Flight (Optional)

Airport Transfers in Athens

Accommodations

Breakfast

Groups Excursions & Transport

Security Evacuation Protection

Medical Insurance

Program Director & Faculty
on-site 24/7

To help you budget, keep in mind that you are responsible for the cost of obtaining a passport ($145), two meals per day + personal expenses (approx. $600-$1200 depending on your food tastes/spending habits/optional independent travel preferences), ISIC card (required, $25), any class readings/materials, and any fees from your college/university.

Although KIIS tries to foresee all possible expenses in formulating program fees, please note that dramatic fluctuations in foreign currency valuations and/or airline surcharges may affect the total cost of the program.

Group Flight

Estimated Cost: $1,750 – $1,850

The Greece program offers a group flight option where you can travel to/from Athens, Greece with other students and faculty. If you choose this option, KIIS will purchase a round-trip flight ticket for you. The flight cost will be added to your final program fee on April 1. The group flight will depart from Cincinnati or Louisville.

If not selecting the group flight, you are responsible to purchase your own roundtrip airfare.

The flight to Greece is overnight arriving the following morning. On the return, the flight from Greece  to the USA departs and arrives on the same day.Visit Flights and Passports & Visas for more information.

Student Voices

Take Your Education Further

Additional information

Location

,

Term

Subject

, , ,

Reviews

There are no reviews yet.

Leave a customer review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Back To Top