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Salzburg

Dates

May 26 – June 25, 2019

Cost

$4,495 + airfare
Scholarships & Financial Aid

Subjects

Conducting, Music History, Music Literature, Music Theory, Musical Theatre, Opera

Deadlines

Dec. 1, 2018: Apply Early & Save $100
Feb. 15, 2019: Regular Deadline 

Program Overview

The KIIS summer program in Salzburg, Austria offers you a unique opportunity to study, practice, and study the performing arts in this beautiful European city. Birthplace of Mozart and home to the world-famous Mozarteum, Salzburg has long been renowned as an international and historical performing arts center. Salzburg also is a city of stunning architecture. Founded in the 8th Century, Salzburg displays evidence of Roman culture, the Middle Ages (notably the Festung), and wonderfully-preserved Baroque buildings. Situated on the banks of the Salzach River, nestled near the Alps, home to three universities, and filled with hospitable people, Salzburg indeed is a magical city. The program also includes a day trip to Munich and an overnight excursion to Vienna.

Language Requirement: None. All courses are taught in English. 

Accommodations: Hostel, 3-5 people per room

OrientationMandatory orientation on Saturday, April 13 in Bowling Green, KY. See Orientation for more information.

DirectorProf. Scot Buzza, buzzas1@nku.edu

Courses

All courses are taught in English and are 3 credit hours. You may enroll in 1-2 courses. Due to the number of course offerings on the Salzburg program, courses are divided into 3 time-blocks. You cannot select 2 courses in the same time block.

Block 1

MUS 327 Music History II

Prof. Scot Buzza

We focus on the major composers and important performance trends from the Classical period through the present day. (*It covers the material from Music History II for a two-semester sequence, or History III in a three-semester sequence.)

 

 

MUS 338-4 Topics: Twilight in Vienna

Dr. Matthew Herman

Around the turn of the 20thcentury, pivotal geopolitical events were taking place in Europe that would eventually lead to the end of the Austro-Hungarian Empire.  At the same time, German and Austrian composers were stretching and breaking the conventional rules of music, which led to the erosion of the tonal system and the eventual abandonment of tonality itself.  Students will examine the history and music of this era in equal measure, with opportunities to visit locations important to both of these topics in and around Vienna.

MUS 430 Music Literature: Mozart's Operas

Dr. Yvonne Hartinger

Students will explore the development of Mozart’s operas from his early years in Salzburg to his late years in Vienna. Through score study, readings, videos, and excursions in Salzburg and Vienna, students will examine Mozart’s works in the context of his life and the culture of the place in which he was born and worked.

Block 2

MUS 310 Pedagogy for Performance Majors: Vocal Health & Techniques

Dr. Joy Burdette

This is a course designed for all serious voice users, including singers, actors, and teachers. Through readings and discussion, students will study the various components of vocal production including anatomy, posture, respiration, registration, phonation, resonance, articulation, expression, and coordination. The course will explore health issues related to the voice, and cultivate exercises, images, and metaphors for use in the studio, ensemble rehearsal, and group-voice classroom.

MUS 338-2 Topics: Instrumental & Choral Conducting

Prof. Daniel Parsley

Student musicians will develop conducting technique through analysis and score study, individual and group exercises, study of conducting drills, individual works and excerpts, individual “podium” time for conducting and rehearsing, and self-evaluation of videotaped exercises. Special emphasis will be placed on clarity in preparations, cut-offs, cues, fermate, dynamics, articulations, changes of tempo, irregular meters,  and expressive gestures.

MUS 430-2 Music Literature: Poetry, Song, and the Romantic Imagination

Dr. Michael Baker                                

A study of German romantic song through analysis, interpretation, composition, and performance of Lieder. Through close readings of poems and detailed analyses of selected songs of the period, applied composition of selected poetry, and performance of selected works, students gain a deeper understanding of the devices and delights of romantic poetry, the musical techniques used by composers of the era to draw out musico-poetic meaning, and the cultural influences that fueled the romantic imagination.

Block 3

MUS 200 Theory III

Dr. Matthew Herman                            

A study of the various chromatic materials and techniques used by composers during the Common Practice Era, including secondary functions, common-chord modulation, and chromatic pre-dominant harmonies.  Students will approach these topics through analysis and composition exercises. In addition to classroom activities, students will participate in field experiences that relate directly to prominent composers of the Classical and Romantic Era.

MUS 338-1 Topics: Form & Analysis

Dr. Michael Baker         

Form and Analysis develops aural and written skills for analyzing how structural functions delineate musical form. The course will cover the full range of formal elements, from the smallest (motives and phrases) to the largest (rondo and sonata form). Through detailed score study of assigned pieces, directed listening activities (both online and at assigned concerts/recitals offered in Salzburg and Vienna), applied model composition assignments, and in-class performance activities, students gain a greater understanding of formal principles.

MUS 338-3 / THEA 412 Topics: Musical Theatre Performance and Survey

Dr. Joy Burdette

Students embark on a study of musical theatre styles from European operetta to contemporary rock musicals, via online reading, listening, and video sources. Students will perform musical theatre solo repertoire from these various time periods. Students will develop skills and confidence in musical and operatic theatre and apply these skills in their performances with the KIIS Choir throughout Salzburg, as well as on the final concert at the completion of the program.

All KIIS course credit is awarded by Western Kentucky University. Prior to your KIIS program, please speak with your home campus academic advisor and/or study abroad office to determine course equivalencies. Grades will be transferred to your home institution in mid-August after the completion of the program. Course offerings are subject to change according to enrollment. For more information, visit Transcripts & Grades.

Program Excursions

What's Included

Program Cost: $4,495 + airfare

Earn up to 6 Credit Hours

Group Flight (Optional)

Airport Transfers in Munich

Accommodations

Daily Breakfasts & Week-day Lunches

Groups Excursions & Transport

Salzburg Bus Pass

Security Evacuation Protection

Medical Insurance

To help you budget, keep in mind that you are responsible for the cost of your textbooks & materials, passport fees ($135), weekend lunches and all dinners, personal expenses (approx. $900 minimum), independent travel ($500, optional), private lessons with Salzburg professionals (optional) and any fees from your college/university.

Although KIIS tries to foresee all possible expenses in formulating program fees, please note that dramatic fluctuations in foreign currency valuations and/or airline surcharges may affect the total cost of the program.

Group Flight

Estimated Cost: $1,650 – $1,750

The Salzburg program offers a group flight option where you can travel to/from Salzburg with other students and faculty. If you choose this option, KIIS will purchase a roundtrip flight ticket for you. The flight cost will be added to your final program fee on April 1. The group flight will depart from Cincinnati or Louisville and fly to Munich, Germany where the group will then travel together to Salzburg, Austria.

If not selecting the group flight, you are responsible to purchase your individual flight.

The flight to Munich, Germany is overnight arriving the following morning. On the return, the flight from Munich, Germany to the USA departs and arrives on the same day. Visit Flights and Passports & Visas for more information.

Student Voices

Take Your Education Further

Category:

Description

Dates

May 26 – June 25, 2019

Cost

$4,495 + airfare
Scholarships & Financial Aid

Subjects

Conducting, Music History, Music Literature, Music Theory, Musical Theatre, Opera

Deadlines

Dec. 1, 2018: Apply Early & Save $100
Feb. 15, 2019: Regular Deadline 

Program Overview

The KIIS summer program in Salzburg, Austria offers you a unique opportunity to study, practice, and study the performing arts in this beautiful European city. Birthplace of Mozart and home to the world-famous Mozarteum, Salzburg has long been renowned as an international and historical performing arts center. Salzburg also is a city of stunning architecture. Founded in the 8th Century, Salzburg displays evidence of Roman culture, the Middle Ages (notably the Festung), and wonderfully-preserved Baroque buildings. Situated on the banks of the Salzach River, nestled near the Alps, home to three universities, and filled with hospitable people, Salzburg indeed is a magical city. The program also includes a day trip to Munich and an overnight excursion to Vienna.

Language Requirement: None. All courses are taught in English. 

Accommodations: Hostel, 3-5 people per room

OrientationMandatory orientation on Saturday, April 13 in Bowling Green, KY. See Orientation for more information.

DirectorProf. Scot Buzza, buzzas1@nku.edu

Courses

All courses are taught in English and are 3 credit hours. You may enroll in 1-2 courses. Due to the number of course offerings on the Salzburg program, courses are divided into 3 time-blocks. You cannot select 2 courses in the same time block.

Block 1

MUS 327 Music History II

Prof. Scot Buzza

We focus on the major composers and important performance trends from the Classical period through the present day. (*It covers the material from Music History II for a two-semester sequence, or History III in a three-semester sequence.)

 

 

MUS 338-4 Topics: Twilight in Vienna

Dr. Matthew Herman

Around the turn of the 20thcentury, pivotal geopolitical events were taking place in Europe that would eventually lead to the end of the Austro-Hungarian Empire.  At the same time, German and Austrian composers were stretching and breaking the conventional rules of music, which led to the erosion of the tonal system and the eventual abandonment of tonality itself.  Students will examine the history and music of this era in equal measure, with opportunities to visit locations important to both of these topics in and around Vienna.

MUS 430 Music Literature: Mozart's Operas

Dr. Yvonne Hartinger

Students will explore the development of Mozart’s operas from his early years in Salzburg to his late years in Vienna. Through score study, readings, videos, and excursions in Salzburg and Vienna, students will examine Mozart’s works in the context of his life and the culture of the place in which he was born and worked.

Block 2

MUS 310 Pedagogy for Performance Majors: Vocal Health & Techniques

Dr. Joy Burdette

This is a course designed for all serious voice users, including singers, actors, and teachers. Through readings and discussion, students will study the various components of vocal production including anatomy, posture, respiration, registration, phonation, resonance, articulation, expression, and coordination. The course will explore health issues related to the voice, and cultivate exercises, images, and metaphors for use in the studio, ensemble rehearsal, and group-voice classroom.

MUS 338-2 Topics: Instrumental & Choral Conducting

Prof. Daniel Parsley

Student musicians will develop conducting technique through analysis and score study, individual and group exercises, study of conducting drills, individual works and excerpts, individual “podium” time for conducting and rehearsing, and self-evaluation of videotaped exercises. Special emphasis will be placed on clarity in preparations, cut-offs, cues, fermate, dynamics, articulations, changes of tempo, irregular meters,  and expressive gestures.

MUS 430-2 Music Literature: Poetry, Song, and the Romantic Imagination

Dr. Michael Baker                                

A study of German romantic song through analysis, interpretation, composition, and performance of Lieder. Through close readings of poems and detailed analyses of selected songs of the period, applied composition of selected poetry, and performance of selected works, students gain a deeper understanding of the devices and delights of romantic poetry, the musical techniques used by composers of the era to draw out musico-poetic meaning, and the cultural influences that fueled the romantic imagination.

Block 3

MUS 200 Theory III

Dr. Matthew Herman                            

A study of the various chromatic materials and techniques used by composers during the Common Practice Era, including secondary functions, common-chord modulation, and chromatic pre-dominant harmonies.  Students will approach these topics through analysis and composition exercises. In addition to classroom activities, students will participate in field experiences that relate directly to prominent composers of the Classical and Romantic Era.

MUS 338-1 Topics: Form & Analysis

Dr. Michael Baker         

Form and Analysis develops aural and written skills for analyzing how structural functions delineate musical form. The course will cover the full range of formal elements, from the smallest (motives and phrases) to the largest (rondo and sonata form). Through detailed score study of assigned pieces, directed listening activities (both online and at assigned concerts/recitals offered in Salzburg and Vienna), applied model composition assignments, and in-class performance activities, students gain a greater understanding of formal principles.

MUS 338-3 / THEA 412 Topics: Musical Theatre Performance and Survey

Dr. Joy Burdette

Students embark on a study of musical theatre styles from European operetta to contemporary rock musicals, via online reading, listening, and video sources. Students will perform musical theatre solo repertoire from these various time periods. Students will develop skills and confidence in musical and operatic theatre and apply these skills in their performances with the KIIS Choir throughout Salzburg, as well as on the final concert at the completion of the program.

All KIIS course credit is awarded by Western Kentucky University. Prior to your KIIS program, please speak with your home campus academic advisor and/or study abroad office to determine course equivalencies. Grades will be transferred to your home institution in mid-August after the completion of the program. Course offerings are subject to change according to enrollment. For more information, visit Transcripts & Grades.

Program Excursions

What's Included

Program Cost: $4,495 + airfare

Earn up to 6 Credit Hours

Group Flight (Optional)

Airport Transfers in Munich

Accommodations

Daily Breakfasts & Week-day Lunches

Groups Excursions & Transport

Salzburg Bus Pass

Security Evacuation Protection

Medical Insurance

To help you budget, keep in mind that you are responsible for the cost of your textbooks & materials, passport fees ($135), weekend lunches and all dinners, personal expenses (approx. $900 minimum), independent travel ($500, optional), private lessons with Salzburg professionals (optional) and any fees from your college/university.

Although KIIS tries to foresee all possible expenses in formulating program fees, please note that dramatic fluctuations in foreign currency valuations and/or airline surcharges may affect the total cost of the program.

Group Flight

Estimated Cost: $1,650 – $1,750

The Salzburg program offers a group flight option where you can travel to/from Salzburg with other students and faculty. If you choose this option, KIIS will purchase a roundtrip flight ticket for you. The flight cost will be added to your final program fee on April 1. The group flight will depart from Cincinnati or Louisville and fly to Munich, Germany where the group will then travel together to Salzburg, Austria.

If not selecting the group flight, you are responsible to purchase your individual flight.

The flight to Munich, Germany is overnight arriving the following morning. On the return, the flight from Munich, Germany to the USA departs and arrives on the same day. Visit Flights and Passports & Visas for more information.

Student Voices

Take Your Education Further

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