reddy


        OR Click for PDF Snapshot of all courses

 Courses are taught in English, unless noted.
 Courses are 3 credit hours each, unless noted.

Anthropology/Archeology

ANTH 125 Introduction to Biological Anthropology (3 hours)
This class will focus on the analysis of skeletal remains from an archaeological perspective. The class with have two units. The first unit will cover human osteology focusing on human skeletal identification for archeologists. Techniques for estimated age at death, ethnicity, and sex from human skeletal remains will be covered. Also we will review pathology as evidenced in archaeological records and interpretation of disease in a biocultural context. The second unit will include zooarcheology which is the identification, analysis and interpretation of animal remains from archeological sites. Topics include identification of subsistence patterns, different economies, animal domestication, taphonomy, environmental inferences from faunal remains and historical use of subsistence resources. Taught in Peru by Dr. Suzanne Strait.

ANTH 366 Topics: Andean Archaeology (3 hours)
This course studies the pre-Hispanic Incan civilization of the Andes. Readings, lecture material and discussion will consider the rise of the Inca as the last in a long series of many previous Andean state level societies. Visits to archaeological sites and museums will form an important part of this course. Taught in Peru by Dr. Kelli Carmean.

ANTH 366/ BIOL 475 Topics: Human Population Biology (3 hours)
For more than 10,000 years humans have occupied the Andean altiplano at altitudes exceeding 3000 meters. Human bodies perform best at sea level, but many populations habitually live at high elevations that can substantially stress the respiratory and circulatory systems of low attitude populations. This class will study the morphological and physiological adaptions in high-altitude populations have been documented including enlarged chests, increased lung capacities, relatively hypoxia-tolerant, increased pulmonary diffusion, longer period of adolescence, increased hemoglobin levels, and increased birth weight. The difference between acclimatization and adaption will be discussed. Finally, biocultural comparisons will also be made to studies on high altitudes populations in Tibet and Ethiopia. Taught in Peru by Dr. Suzanne Strait.

      Return to Top

Art/Art History
ART 130 Two Dimensional Design: A Visual Journey (3 hours)
This introductory design course is for the inquisitive and adventurous student, who will be asked to create a personal visual map of Barcelona culture using an introduction to basic design concepts and assigned design projects. These projects will require exploration of the city's museums, architecture and cultural centers. Students will be asked the question, "How can we creatively immerse ourselves, so that we document our travel experience as artists?" The goal of this course will be to familiarize students with elements and principles of art and design, as they interact with the city in a creative and productive way. Journals, simple drawing media, and an inexpensive digital camera will be required to create and document design projects. Students will design and create an online blog during the progress of the course. Taught in Barcelona by Prof. Philip Wiggs.

ART 311 Foundations of Art Education: Traveling Classroom (3 hours)
This class is designed for prospective art teachers and art students interested in developing a foundation in design elements and teaching methods that constitute an effective and creative approach to the art education classroom. This course will explore the concept of "the traveling classroom," as we use both traditional and alternative materials to create art projects and design lesson plans that embrace being immersed in the vibrant cultural city of Barcelona. An inexpensive camera, journal, pencils and pens will be required for recording images, sketches, and lesson plan ideas, as well as to document the art and architecture of Barcelona. Taught in Barcelona by Prof. Philip Wigg.

ART 491 Topics: The Art Museum: Art and Nationalism in Barcelona (3 hours)
This course uses the museums of Barcelona as its classroom. Barcelona boasts some of the most innovative museums in Europe, with a particular emphasis on modern art and culture. The course, however, will explore the broader artistic history of the region, including museums that focus on material culture. Thus we begin with the Museum of Archaeology of Cataluna exploring pre-History through Roman material culture and ending with the Museum of Contemporary Culture of Barcelona. Catalan identity is celebrated within these collections and deliberately crafted to present an independent and forward thinking city and region. Designed as a museum studies course, the class will focus on curatorial decision-making, which includes issues of exhibition design and layout, collections management, marketing, museum education, and accessibility. Taught in Barcelona by Dr. Eileen McKiernan-Gonzalez.

ART 243 Digital Media (3 hours)
Introduce the technical skills, techniques, and aesthetics to the new-media platform of Adobe. Examine, compose and post to social-media sites like Tumblr, Pinterest, and Instagram. Students will capture impressions from real life and the web, then conceptualize and reassemble these for sharing on the Internet. Students learn the principles of new media by working with advanced editing software. Taught in Berlin by Prof. Arden von Haeger.

ART 438 Advanced Graphics: Design Metropolis (3 hours)
German visual communications and design continue to be a powerful influence on the international commercial creative market. This course will take an exploration into the creative and business side of design and advertising, through visits to museums, architectural sites, design agencies, fashion and advertising studios. Expect a boot-camp style approach to graphic design, fashion, packaging, industrial, interior and dimensional design, with emphasis on professional application, form and function. Geared for creatives interested in the fields of advertising or graphic/interior/fashion/architectural design, this program culminates with a student gallery exhibit and printed portfolio book featuring logo design, brochure and packaging concepts. Each book will be specific to the individual student's career goals and branding, and will be a tangible tool in marketing themselves as professionals in their chosen field.
Taught in Berlin by Prof. Arden von Haeger .

ART 496 Topics in Studio Art: Street Scenes Berlin - Digital Photo and Zine (3 hours)
Students will use small digital cameras or their phones to shoot both still images and video to create an online e-zine of images to create a serve as a critical guide to contemporary art and artists showing in Berlin. Student will shoot, compile, interview and write small critiques of art in Berlin daily. No art background is required, but encouraged. The basics of composition and design elements will be taught and explored via the photographic images, social media and blog formats. Taught in Berlin by Prof. Doreen Maloney.

ART 105 History of Art to 1300 (3 hours) Honors credit available
Experiential comparative analysis of selected key works and monuments of cultures before 1300 that have left their imprint on Italy, using site visits and museum collections. With the arts of Imperial Rome as our unifying core we will examine Etruscan precedents and differences; Roman uses of an Egyptian Other and their ambivalent relationship to Classical Greek art; and echoes of Rome in Christian art and the medieval Italian city-states. Themes across cultures will include art as a materialization of spiritual or worldly power in funerary art, ancestors and afterlives; in shrines and images of holy powers; and in secular power relations like ruler imagery and gendered imagery. Note: any student with a 3.2 GPA or above can enroll in this course for Honors credit. Students enrolled for Honors credit will have more challenging and unconventional assignments that will require greater analytical, creative, and critical thinking skills. Taught in Italy by Dr. Alice Christ.

ART 401 Art of the Italian Renaissance (3 hours)
Using Michael Baxandall's Art and Experience in Renaissance Italy as a guide, we will practice deciphering the interests and values of patrons and viewers of paintings by famous Renaissance artists like Masaccio, Fra Angelico and Fra Filippo Lippi, Piero della Francesca and Botticelli. Although the subject matter is often religious, formal and iconographic analysis will reveal surprising messages about contemporary issues involving, for example, money and morality, relations of church and state or gender roles in society. Taught in Italy by Dr. Alice Christ.

ART 494 Seminar: Art and Christianity (3 hours)
The course investigates the symbolic value and expressive power of Christian art. In visits to museums, churches and holy sites, we consider works of art and architecture in relation to liturgy, doctrine and belief. We learn about Church history and religious practice. We also learn about artistic principles and gain an appreciation for the creative impulse in different historical periods. The place-as-text teaching approach will be used and students will develop critical thinking skills. Taught in Italy by Dr. Christopher Fulton.

ART 491 Topics: Photographic History of Paris (3 hours)
Paris has long been a love for photographers. The history of photography and Paris dates back to the very beginning of image capture with the work of Louis Daguerre and Joseph Niepce, the fathers of photography. In this class we will explore the city following the paths of legends like Bresson, Atget and Brassai. Students will also examine the work of more contemporary French artists such as Sophie Calle, Elliott Erwitt and JR, while learning about the evolution of drawing with light, in the city of light. Taught in Paris I by Prof. Lee Paynter.

ART 496 Topics: Digital Photography (3 hours)
This is a course that explores and provides the techniques and critical base for making digital images. The framework of the course will involve lecture, reading, métier assignments, and critique, all of which revolve around a hands-on approach to capturing photographic images with the use of a digital camera as a tool. Through the combination of lectures, demonstrations, assignments, and critiques, students learn to see photographically through an exploration of the basic tools, techniques, and aesthetics of digital photography, with an emphasis on creative use of camera controls, exposure, and digital imaging software. Taught in Paris I by Prof. Lee Paynter.

ART 106 History of Art since 1300 (3 hours)
A selective chronological study of the major visual arts from Gothic through modern times. Taught exclusively on sites (churches, museums, galleries, etc.), the course surveys art of the Western tradition. Emphasis is placed on understanding art within a particular historical and social context, giving students a sense of the history of ideas as well as their visual expression. Taught in Prague by Dr. Zbynek "ZB" Smetana.

ART 140 Drawing I (3 hours)
To provide an introduction to drawing. Students will learn methods of on-site visual information gathering. The visual elements of mark making, gesture, line, value (dark and lights), perspective, use of positive and negative space, composition (use of the page), and use of wet and/or dry media. An emphasis in the use of perspective in drawing (onsite as well as in a possible classroom setting) will be a focus. Taught in Prague by Prof. Dale Leys.

ART 491 Special Studies: Individual Topics in the History of Art (3 hours) Graduate credit available
An independent course in art history for advanced, self-directed undergraduate and graduate students majoring in art, art history, or architecture. Students will participate in the ART 106 instructional activities. Each student must submit and receive prior approval of their study plan. Prerequisite/Co-requisite: ART 106 or equivalent and the consent of Dr. Smetana. Taught in Prague by Dr. Zbynek "ZB" Smetana.

ART 491 Topics: Travel Journal for Artists (3 hours) Graduate credit available
To provide advanced instruction in on-site drawing working in media students can travel with, allowing for on-site information gathering. Upon returning home, future studio works would be based in part on these experiences.  Students will learn methods of on-site visual information gathering. Students keep a written and drawn journal/sketchbook and produce on-site drawings. To provide on-site advanced drawing instruction, students work in media they can travel with, including the use of the wet and/or dry media, allowing for on-site information gathering. The material collected would be used as source material for future works. Taught in Prague by Prof. Dale Leys.

      Return to Top

Biology
BIO 475 Topics: Biology and Sustainability / GEOG 328 Elements of Biogeography (3 hours)
This cross-listed course examines key environmental issues in the modern world, and will compare and contrast Danish and American approaches to meeting those challenges. Topics include energy production and use; human impacts on Earth's atmosphere; water sources, use, and disposal; solid waste; and human population and food production. Denmark is a leader in production of wind energy. It also has some solar power production and a hydrogen energy plant. We examine problems associated with extraction and use of fossil fuels and consider alternative forms of energy. We visit Danish alternative energy facilities. The use of carbon-based energy sources has produced significant alteration of Earth's atmosphere, which is causing rapid alteration of Earth's climate. Denmark is largely a low-lying island nation. Consideration of the consequences of climate change, including a rapid sea level rise will be made much more real by being in such a location. Water is a crucial resource for humans, both for our direct use and for our indirect use as a necessary resource for food production. We will examine how Copenhagen produces water for human use and how it handles its waste water. Denmark is in the process of constructing a large incinerator/energy generation plant (the Amager Bakke Incinerator, with a ski slope on its roof). We visit this site as we consider waste disposal as an issue. Finally, the growth of human population underlies all of these demands that we place on the environment. We consider patterns of population growth and prospects for producing adequate food in the future. We compare and contrast Danish and American attitudes toward population issues. Taught in Denmark by Dr. Malcolm Frisbie.

BIOL 475 / HIST 490 Topics: Foundations of Modern Science (3 hours)
This cross-listed course examines the development of modern emphasis on four broad areas of intellectual history: the including conceptualizing Earth's place in the cosmos, the origin of modern geology, the rise of evolutionary thought, and the development of a workable model of the atom. Several Danish scientists played key roles in the development of these ideas: Tycho Brahe (astronomy), Niels Stensen (better known as Steno, geology), and Niels Bohr (physics). We visit historical and educational sites associated with these scientists including the Steno Museum (history of science), the island of Hven (where Brahe built two observatories), the Round Tower (historical observatory from the period just after Brahe), Kroppedal (museum of Danish astronomy), the Niels Bohr Institute, and Carlsberg Academy. Bohr's life and work intersected with World War II, which resulted in his escape from Denmark and work with the British mission to the Manhattan Project in the USA. We will explore sites associated with the German occupation of Denmark and attend the play "Copenhagen", which depicts Bohr's meeting with Werner Heisenberg shortly before his escape from Denmark. This cross-listed course is team-taught in Denmark by Dr. Carolyn Dupont and Dr. Malcolm Frisbie.

BIOL 475/ ANTH 366 Topics: Human Population Biology (3 hours)
For more than 10,000 years humans have occupied the Andean altiplano at altitudes exceeding 3000 meters. Human bodies perform best at sea level, but many populations habitually live at high elevations that can substantially stress the respiratory and circulatory systems of low attitude populations. This class will study the morphological and physiological adaptions in high-altitude populations have been documented including enlarged chests, increased lung capacities, relatively hypoxia-tolerant, increased pulmonary diffusion, longer period of adolescence, increased hemoglobin levels, and increased birth weight. The difference between acclimatization and adaption will be discussed. Finally, biocultural comparisons will also be made to studies on high altitudes populations in Tibet and Ethiopia. Taught in Peru by Dr. Suzanne Strait.

      Return to Top

Business Administration
MGT 316 International Management (3 hours) Graduate credit available
This course will focus on the opportunities and challenges associated with the management of organizations and business strategy in the global environment. It is designed to ensure that students gain a general overview of the process and effect of internationalization in contemporary business. The course introduces students to theories, concepts and skills relevant to managing effectively in today's global environment. Ultimately, students will be challenged to integrate the knowledge they have gained from other business core subjects and apply their accumulated knowledge to a few business case studies with global themes. Taught in Argentina by Dr. Uyi Lawani.

MGT 305 Ethics and Critical Thinking: Business Ethics (3 hours) Graduate credit available
This course presents an examination of the administrator's social, ethical, and environmental responsibilities to his employees, customers, and the general public and other external factors which management must be cognizant of in modern society. Ethical decision making in an organization, or for that matter any setting, does not occur in a vacuum. As individuals and as managers, we formulate our ethics (the standards of "right" and "wrong" behavior that we set for ourselves) based upon a number of converging concepts, ideals and variables, including; family, peer, and religious influences, our past experiences, and our own unique value systems. When we make ethical decisions within the organizational context, many times there are situational factors and potential conflict of interest that further complicate the process. Taught in Argentina by Dr. Uyi Lawani.

MGT 303 International Business (3 hours)
The goal of this course is to train future U.S. business managers to understand the differences in cultures, economic systems, and business practices in the global marketplace. This course will focus on the fundamentals of international business, particularly in planning, organizing, and control aspects of the multinational enterprises. Roles of government, culture, foreign currency, taxes, political risk, and legal formalities for small and large firms entering new markets are emphasized. Comprehensive discussions and analysis of international business will be facilitated in the environment where international businesses compete. The course will also focus on a number of timely international issues and developments, such as the formation of the European Union (EU), the recent expansion of the EU, and the strategic role of Austria in the EU. Taught in Austria by Dr. Philip Seagraves.

BA 420 Topics: International Real Estate Issues (3 hours)
Students will gain a perspective of real estate markets in foreign countries, including issues of cross-border investment and development. Real estate markets in foreign countries operate differently than in the United States due to differences in political systems, economic systems and legal systems. As a result, success in international real estate requires an understanding of differences such as real estate property types, land use controls and policies, taxation, ownership structures and investment vehicles, legal systems, finance, currency issues.
Conducting business in a foreign country or conducting business with someone from a foreign country requires an understanding of differing social structures, religious and ethical systems, education, and cultural differences. We will explore these issues through a series of lectures, site visits to firms in Austria, and through independent research of an assigned country and business case study. An additional possible branch of discussion could include the impact on Europe's development as concepts such as personal property rights have developed through the changing political structures over the history of the region. Taught in Austria by Dr. Philip Seagraves.

      Return to Top

Chinese
CHIN 101 Elementary Chinese I (3 hours)
This course is designed to introduce Mandarin Chinese to students who have none or very little background in the language. Students whose Chinese has exceeded the scope of the course should not take the class, unless permitted specially by the instructor. This course introduces basic knowledge about the Chinese language and develops your skills in listening, speaking, reading and writing in Mandarin Chinese. Students will learn the history of the Chinese writing system, and pinyin, the pronunciation system. Students will also learn to write Chinese characters, basic grammar structures, and the most frequently used vocabulary and expressions in real-life situations. Upon successful completion of the course, you should be able to: (1) carry out a basic face-to-face conversation and (2) write about 200 characters and read 260. By the end of the year, you should be able to: (1) carry out a simple face-to-face conversation with ease, (2) read simple stories written in the "spoken style," and (3) write a short letter or story with all the grammar and the 600 vocabulary words learned. Taught in Chinese in China by Dr. He Jianjun.

CHIN 201 Intermediate Chinese I (3 hours)
This course is designed to introduce Mandarin Chinese to students who have none or very little background in the language. This course introduces basic knowledge about the Chinese language and develops students' skills in listening, speaking, reading and writing in Mandarin Chinese. Students will learn the pinyin pronunciation system, Chinese characters, basic grammar structures, and the most frequently used vocabulary and expressions in real-life situations. Upon successful completion of the curse, students should be able to: 1) carry out a basic face-to-face conversation and 2) write about 260 characters and read 300. Taught in Chinese in China by Dr. He Jianjun.

      Return to Top

Communication
COMM 463 Intercultural Communication (3 hours) This course is designed to create an understanding of dimensions of communication theory that apply across cultural boundaries. Emphasis is placed on both theoretical and practical awareness of communication in and between cultures. This course fulfills a core requirement for Communication Studies and Corporate and Organizational Communication majors. Taught in Italy by Dr. Ann Andaloro.

COMM 263 Fundamentals of Communication and Culture (3 hours)
This course examines how communication patterns are influenced by surrounding cultures and how culture is created and sustained through communication. It focuses on communication across cultural boundaries, and is designed to prepare students to effectively adapt and succeed in a contemporary world that is becoming more and more culturally diverse. Taught in Spain May by Dr. Greg Feeney.

      Return to Top

Education
EDU TECH: Capturing Berlin- Tech Tools with a Purpose (3 hours)
Join us for a hands-on technology production course focusing on the culture, people, and landscape of Germany as an inspiration for our lessons. Create a mobile app, produce a video, compose an e-book, and design an interactive fieldtrip. Each week we will discovery more about the country and its people through interviews and excursions so that we can incorporate those experiences into unique technology-based projects. We will cover the basics of multimedia design, coding, photo & video editing, & and much more. Capture memories and new talents with this skill-building course that will prepare you to integrate technology into your own educational setting! Taught in Berlin by Dr. Becky Sue Parton.

EDU TECH: Technology that makes a Difference: Impacting Today's Students to be Tomorrow's Innovators (3 hours)
Germany is at the forefront of many innovative technology endeavors. This course will look at those initiatives through the lens of educators by examining tools and tasks for K-12 that can be a catalyst for future careers. We will connect curriculum content with research and development occurring in the country through field trips, readings, and applied projects. Topics include: (1) Designing 3D image files for MineCraft using TinkerCad as an introduction to industry and manufacturing, (2) Creating an intelligent tutoring system related to German culture as an introduction to artificial intelligence (3) Programming using teen-friendly platforms including Scratch as an introduction to computer science and robotics. You will also develop a tailored tech unit and disseminate it by establishing a wiki, a podcast channel, and related surveys. Taught in Berlin by Dr. Becky Sue Parton.

EDU 300 Becoming an Effective Global Citizen (3 hours)
In this course, participants will have an opportunity to address a real world community/local issue or topic in collaboration with Costa Rican students and educators. Course participants will be instructed in interdisciplinary, project-based instructional methodologies and how they might apply these methodologies in developing mini-inquiry projects with their Costa Rican partners. Throughout the course, various community-based learning principles and strategies, such as pre, during and post reflection activities, will be employed. Students learn highly effective skills across personal, social, and cultural perspectives and will examine how their own choices and cultural belief systems affect others. Taught in Costa Rica by Dr. Penelope Wong.

EDU 400 Topics: Education as Empowerment for Community Action (3 hours)
In this course, participants will be paired or grouped with Costa Rican community members who are involved in community rural tourism, a kind of grassroots tourist industry which directly involves community members, where the tourism is taking place. Given this particular field, having a basic command of not just English but English for Tourism purposes would be an invaluable skill for any community member. Students will learn the basics of second language acquisition and basic instructional lesson planning for teaching individuals English as a foreign language. Taught in Costa Rica by Dr. Penelope Wong.

      Return to Top

English
ENG 339 Topics: Imagining the Spanish Civil War - Hemingway, Hughes, and other American Writers (3 hours)
Some important American writers were eyewitnesses to the Spanish Civil War (1936-1939). Inspired by the struggle against fascism, writers such as Ernest Hemingway, John Dos Passos, Martha Gellhorn, Langston Hughes, and Josephine Herbst traveled to Spain and wrote about their experiences during the war. In this course, we will explore their journalism, poetry, fiction, and personal narratives about wartime Spain. We will pay special attention to their writings about Barcelona, from poetry about the terrifying air bombings that took over 1,500 lives to journalistic accounts of the exodus of refugees from city. On our excursions through the city, we will retrace their footsteps with the aim of creating a literary map of their Barcelona writings and of their experiences in the city. In addition to learning about the history of the Spanish Civil War, students will also gain a deeper appreciation of the relationship between literature and war. Taught in Barcelona by Dr. Andy Doolen.

ENG 349 Topics: Travel Writing - Spain (3 hours)
This course explores the themes of travel in contemporary literature about Spain. How did the experience of traveling in Spain inspire writers? Why were poets, novelists, and essayists drawn to Spain over other countries? How did their immersion in Spanish culture, politics, and history transform their art and challenge their assumptions and beliefs? This course addresses these and other questions by focusing on twentieth- and twenty-first century poetry, fiction, essays, and travel writing. Some of the authors and texts that we will read include Colm Toibin, Langston Hughes, Muriel Rukeyser, Giles Tremlett, Martha Gellhorn, and George Orwell, among others. We will consider specifically how the experiences of travel in Spain provided writers with many possibilities to remake their identities, to learn from new cultural encounters, and to engage in literary experimentation. Taught in Barcelona by Dr. Andy Doolen.

ENG 290 Topics: Classical Greek Comedy (3 hours)
After discussing Comedy as defined by Aristotle's "Poetics," students compare and contrast the bawdy, satirical, chorus-based Old Comedy of 5th century BC Greece with the realistic, moralistic, character-based New Comedy of the 4th century BC. While studying Aristophanes and Menander, students become acquainted with the evolution of style and content as connected to the writers' social and political environment, as well as their influence on contemporary comedy. Such themes as education, politics, war, families, mistaken identity, and love gained/lost/re-gained are examined. Taught in Greece by Dr. Paul Ranieri.

ENG 290 Topics: Women in Ancient Greek Literature (3 hours)
From goddesses to humans, from Athena, Demeter, Hera, and Aphrodite to Penelope, Helen, Sappho, Artemisia, Lysistrata, Aspasia, Praxithea, and Medea, we will explore many dynamic female characters in ancient Greek literature and how well they reflect to us the lives of women in ancient Greek culture. What was their role in their cultures? How did they define their society for both men and other women? Through readings, discussion, writing, and visits to classical sites, we will investigate how these characters shape how we see women in both classical and contemporary society. Taught in Greece by Dr. Paul Ranieri.

ENG 396 Mythology (3 hours) or RELS 399 Study Abroad: Greek Myth in Context (3 hours) Honors credit available
This is a cross-listed course. No stories contain greater richness and depth and none have been more influential than those we call "Greek myths." In this cross-listed course students learn important ancient Greek tales while visiting sites in which many of these myths are said to have taken place—Athens, Eleusis, Delos, Delphi, Argos, and Mycenae. Meanwhile, students learn to read these tales as represented in Greek art—on vases and in sculpture that we view. Note: any student with a 3.2 GPA or above can enroll in this course for Honors credit. Students enrolled for Honors credit will have more challenging and unconventional assignments that will require greater analytical, creative, and critical thinking skills. Taught in Greece by Dr. Richard King.

ENG 290 Topics: Modern Italy (3 hours)
In this course, we will focus on the modern history of Italy, with attention to the trajectory of literature, film, and culture as they have been influenced and changed in various eras by various historical figures and events. In particular, we will think about the advent and evolution of film and film-making, along with some major literary figures from the 19th century through today. We will read some literature, but the bulk of this course will be focused on examining the sites from which various literary/artistic figures and ideas emerged and the role of these places in Italian literature. Taught in Italy by Prof. Lynda Mercer.

ENG 290 Topics: Classical Mythology & the Bible (3 hours)
This course would provide art students with the literary background to understand, identify, and appreciate the numerous allusions in painting and sculpture to mythological or biblical subjects, especially in the art that students will be viewing in Rome and Florence. Students' knowledge of ancient stories and characters is crucial in order for them to appreciate more fully representational works of art, whether medieval paintings of the annunciation and the crucifixion or Renaissance depictions of Greek pastoral scenes. I would use the Bible and Ovid's Metamorphoses as the key texts, as well as other readings particularly relevant to the experience of art in Italy. I have taught courses in "The Bible and Literature" as well as in Mythology, and would draw on that background in designing and teaching this course. Taught in Italy by Dr. Lloyd Davies.

ENG 290 Topics: Italy in the Literary Imagination (3 hours)
Non-Italian writers have always loved Italy, and many have lived in Italy and used it as the setting for their work. This would be a comparative course, with the literatures of England, Germany, and America all represented. From Germany I would choose Goethe's Roman Elegies and Mann's short stories, "Death in Venice" and "Mario and the Magician." From England I would include a selection from the Romantics, including the fourth canto of Byron's Childe Harold's Pilgrimage, which provides a wonderful sense of Italy, especially Rome. Shelley, Keats and the Brownings also lived in and wrote about Italy, so we would study them as well. Forster's A Room with a View, with its setting in Florence, would be an excellent choice for a modernist British novel (the film would be good, too), and from America I would include Henry James' The Aspern Papers, set in Venice, and Daisy Miller, which ends in Rome. I would also like to use the film "Tea with Mussolini," which is a fascinating study of the emigre community in Florence just prior to World War II. This course would expose students to a number of internationally known authors and texts and also allow them to compare their own experience of Italy with these works of imagination. Taught in Italy by Dr. Lloyd Davies.

ENG 290 Women in Japanese Literature (3 hours)
This course will cover Japanese literature, in various genres, from the Meiji period to contemporary Japan. Japanese cultural ideas, such as ninjo and giri, will be examined as they appear in the reading, all with the aim of gaining deeper insight into the culture and mindset of the Japanese. Stories set in Tokyo, Kyoto, and other locations will give the students the unique perspective of these cities, their residents, and their culture. The texts will be chosen to help generate critical thinking about the role of gender, class, and historical events in the formation of the culture. Taught in Japan by Prof. Kendra Sheehan.

ENG 339 Topics: 20th Century Czech Literature (3 hours)
The Czech Republic (especially the city, Prague) has a rich and compelling literary tradition. This course will familiarize students with some of the major writers in this tradition and its geographical, historical, and philosophical context. A guiding question will be how place influences creative/literary expression. Field trips and excursions into the city to explore sites directly tied to the authors and their texts will help students in this endeavor. We will read a couple of Jan Neruda’s short stories, Franz Kafka’s The Trial, Jaroslav Hašek’s The Good Soldier Švejk, Milan Kundera’s The Unbearable Lightness of Being, and selected poems from canonical Czech poets such as Karel Hynek Macha and Karel Capek. We will also study some of the landmark ideas of twentieth-century continental philosophy, particularly existentialism as a way to understand the literary themes we encounter. Students will write several short papers analyzing the intersection of place, time, and literature. The course will also require students to actively participate in discussion and take a final exam. We will take several self-guided walking tours to encounter the city, its art and architecture, its culture, and its history, giving us a sense of the world in which the writers we study lived. Several classes will be held where the writers wrote, ate, and drank.
Taught in Prague by Dr. Jeffrey Osborne.

ENG 349 Topics: Travel Writing & Study Abroad (3 hours)
Quite often, we tend to view a country or a city as a homogeneous place, quickly reducing it to a bite-sized concept or perspective that we can easily digest in a unifying experience. One of the values of study abroad transcends seeking the Czech Republic experience in order to discover the truly diverse and complex components that make up the country and, in particular, the city of Prague. This course, then, aims to get students to think of their time in the Czech Republic as a set of experiences, rather than one single homogenized experience. Using David Farley and Jessie Sholl’s anthology, Travelers’ Tales: Prague and the Czech Republic, as a collection of travel-writing models this course will ask students to translate their experiences into writing that aims to capture the complexity of the experience of place. Students will be required to write in several modes, choosing several of a long list of forms: poetry, the journal entry, the essay, photo-journalism, blogging, the short story, etcetera. Students may also choose to “write” narrative using other media. For instance, students might choose to compose a photo or video documentary of their experience, so long as these incorporate some writing. The course will introduce students to the genres of travel-writing and memoir; give them experience reading and writing travel-writing and memoir; and provide them ways in which to translate their travel experience into writing.
Taught in Prague by Dr. Jeffrey Osborne.

      Return to Top

Film
FILM 399 Topics: Modern China through Film (3 hours)
An introduction to the cinemas of mainland China, Hong Kong, and Taiwan, with a focus on how social, political and cultural changes of modern and contemporary China find their expressions in films. Students will learn basic skills for understanding and interpreting cinematic language and see beyond what is pleasing to the eye or entertaining: the sociopolitical circumstances under which Chinese films are made, their subtle ambiguities as well as overt messages, and their interpretations of history, the relationship between individual filmmakers' aesthetic styles and social concerns, among other things. Selected film topics include: the "golden days" of Chinese leftist cinema in the 1930s and 1940s; the imperative to create "socialist realist" art in China under Mao's leadership; the challenge to official ideology after the end of the Cultural Revolution; the attempts to capture the changing faces and new mysteries of China with a globalizing economy; contemporary Hong Kong and Taiwan films about urban life and cultural hybridity; and the representations of gender and China's cultural past in martial arts fantasies. Taught in China by Dr. Gao Qian.

      Return to Top

French
FREN 105 Introduction to French Culture (3 hours)
This class aims to familiarize students with the characteristics of French Culture and its capital, Paris.  The class will talk about values, behavioral characteristics, social and political structures representing and achievements of France and its people. Taught in English in Paris 1 by Prof. Eddy Cuisinier.

FREN 314 Introduction to French Literature (3 hours)
In this class students will read selected French short stories, poems, and other literary excerpts, in addition to more current events sources such as newspapers and magazines. These works will span the Middles ages through the present. Students will also compile their own personal portfolio of writings centered on Paris and their own perceptions of the city. Taught in French in Paris I by Prof. Allison Whitehouse.

FREN 321 French Conversation (3 hours)
This course will develop the student's ability to communicate in French on a variety of topics at the intermediate level. Class time will be devoted to the discussion of print/audio/video material studied outside of class. An emphasis will be placed on idiomatic expressions, correct pronunciation, and vocabulary pertaining to current events in France and the Francophone world. Taught in French in Paris I by Prof. Allison Whitehouse.

FREN 306 Experiencing French Abroad: French and Russian Writers(3 hours)
A reading and study of François Mauriac's The Lamb, Françoise Sagan's Bonjour tristesse, Leo Tolstoy's Master and Man, and Chekhov's The Lady With a Pet Dog. A comparison of literary works of two writers from France and two from Russia, some of whose characters pursue happiness through romantic relationships, and some through other ways of creating connection with people. Both the French and the Russian writers appear to engage in quite similar struggles between, on the one hand, more secular and individualistic, and, on the other hand, more spiritual and communal approaches to finding fulfillment, satisfaction, and wisdom in life. All readings and discussion are in French, with the goal of proficiency in the language, and of understanding and expression of the ideas raised. Taught in French in Paris II by Dr. Edward Lee.

FREN 323 French Civilization and Culture: Graphic Paris (3 hours)
The city of Paris has been visually represented in every art form for centuries: paintings, sculptures, photos, film, and graphic novels. This course will examine the visual representations of Paris in comics, or bande dessinee. From the highly respected Louvre series to literary adaptations and historical narratives, we will see how artists portray the city and the effect this has. Taught in French in Paris II by Prof. Jeorg Ellen Sauer.

FREN 323 French Civilization and Culture: The Cultural Heritage of Paris (3 hours)
This course focuses on Paris as Text.  By examining various cultural forms - artistic, historical, economic, gastronomic, etc. - students gain a better appreciation for Parisian society, past and present. The course combines readings, lectures, conferences, and (small) group excursions.  All readings and discussion are in French, with the goal of proficiency in the language, and of understanding and expression of the ideas raised. Taught in French in Paris II by Dr. Edward Lee.

FREN 426 French Literature of the Twentieth Century: French Theatre in Performance (3 hours)
The goal of this course is to explore the history of the French theater by attending performances of plays in Paris. We will see at least one production per week. Prior to the performances, we will read and discuss the texts of the scheduled play, and, following the performance, continue our discussion through analyses of production choices made by the director and actors. The plays we choose will depend on what is being shown in Paris during the five weeks of our course. We will try to see works from different genres—comedy, tragedy, experimental, etc.—and from different historical periods. We will emphasize textual analysis, as well as principles of production: staging, costumes, acting, set design, lighting, music, etc. Taught in French in Paris II by Dr. Jeff Peters.

      Return to Top

Gender & Women's Studies
PSY 299 Topics: Gender Stereotypes & Equality (3 hours)
This course explores developmental and social psychological research on gender stereotypes. Scandinavia ranks at the top in the world for gender equality. They are the benchmark for equal political and economic balance between men and women (unlike the U.S.). In that context, we will explore how, when, and why children develop gender stereotypes, the implications of gender stereotypes on relationships (with friends and romantic partners), academic outcomes, and occupations. We will also explore HOW Denmark achieves gender equality. We take excursions into the local area to explore and document how gender is used in society. We examine how gender is used in schools and interview local residents about their attitudes about gender. We explore how segregation, media, and parenting impact gender stereotypes, and how social policies and cultural attitudes can shape stereotypes. We compare and contrast the use of gender in Denmark to that of the U.S. For a grade, this course has a primary writing assignment, a series of journal entries, and a multimedia project based on the readings and excursions. Taught in Denmark by Dr. Christia Kearns.

ENG 290 Topics: Women in Ancient Greek Literature (3 hours)
From the tragic heroine to the vengeful murderess, we will explore many of the dynamic female characters in ancient Greek text. Through discussion, writing and small group exercises, we will investigate how these sharply drawn characters have shaped popular culture and have influenced feminism and our own views of women in contemporary society. Taught in Greece by Dr. Paul Ranieri.

ENG 290 Women in Japanese Literature (3 hours)
This course will cover Japanese literature, in various genres, from the Meiji period to contemporary Japan. Japanese cultural ideas, such as ninjo and giri, will be examined as they appear in the reading, all with the aim of gaining deeper insight into the culture and mindset of the Japanese. Stories set in Tokyo, Kyoto, and other locations will give the students the unique perspective of these cities, their residents, and their culture. The texts will be chosen to help generate critical thinking about the role of gender, class, and historical events in the formation of the culture. Taught in Japan by Prof. Kendra Sheehan.

GWS 470/SOCL 489 Gender in Latin America (3 hours)
This course explores the role of women in Modern Latin America. The social construction of gender is explored through an examination of women’s use of the role and label of mother as a platform for political participation and social activism. The intersection of gender with class, race and ethnicity will be explored through an examination of human rights struggles and environmental activism. Taught in Merida, Mexico by Dr. Kimberly Pitts.

      Return to Top

Geography
GEOG 328 Elements of Biogeography /BIO 475 Topics: Biology and Sustainability (3 hours)
This cross-listed course examines key environmental issues in the modern world, and will compare and contrast Danish and American approaches to meeting those challenges. Topics include energy production and use; human impacts on Earth's atmosphere; water sources, use, and disposal; solid waste; and human population and food production. Denmark is a leader in production of wind energy. It also has some solar power production and a hydrogen energy plant. We examine problems associated with extraction and use of fossil fuels and consider alternative forms of energy. We visit Danish alternative energy facilities. The use of carbon-based energy sources has produced significant alteration of Earth's atmosphere, which is causing rapid alteration of Earth's climate. Denmark is largely a low-lying island nation. Consideration of the consequences of climate change, including a rapid sea level rise will be made much more real by being in such a location. Water is a crucial resource for humans, both for our direct use and for our indirect use as a necessary resource for food production. We will examine how Copenhagen produces water for human use and how it handles its waste water. Denmark is in the process of constructing a large incinerator/energy generation plant (the Amager Bakke Incinerator, with a ski slope on its roof). We visit this site as we consider waste disposal as an issue. Finally, the growth of human population underlies all of these demands that we place on the environment. We consider patterns of population growth and prospects for producing adequate food in the future. We compare and contrast Danish and American attitudes toward population issues. Taught in Denmark by Dr. Malcolm Frisbie.

GEOG 330 Introduction to Cultural Geography (3 hours)
An overview of core concepts of cultural geography based on five major themes: regional, mobility, globalization, nature-culture, and culture landscapes.  The course will largely focus on Latin America by incorporating multiple field excursions in Peru at various sites throughout the country germane to topics to be presented in the course.
Taught in Peru by Mr. Ryan Kelly.

      Return to Top

German
GERM 306 Experiencing German Abroad: The Cultural Heritage of Munich (3 hours)
This course is designed for an in-depth exploration of the history and culture of Munich and Bavaria. Students practice their written, reading, listening and spoken German language skills while enjoying afternoon excursions into Munich and a weekend trip to Nuremberg. There are further opportunities to visit other German cities during independent travel weekends. Taught in German in Munich by Prof. Timothy Straubel.

GERM 330 German Composition and Conversation (3 hours)
Develops skill in writing and speaking standard German. Stress is on vocabulary building, use of dictionary and control of sentence structures. Skill in spoken German is aimed at enabling the students to find their way around the environment and to function in a social situation. Taught in German in Munich by Prof. Timothy Straubel.

GERM 430 Advanced German Stylistics (3 hours)
Provides intensive grammar instruction and practice in written and spoken German, enabling the student to write letters, reports, essays, and descriptions. Students investigate aspects of German structure that they notice around them. Taught in German in Munich by Dr. Rebeccah Dawson.

GERM 455 Topics: Drama and Film (3 hours)
German drama and film have consistently used the combination of text and image to influence society and culture. This course, taught in German, introduces students to the distinctive world of German drama and film through a careful selection of plays and films to be read and viewed. It will furthermore provide students with both an overview of the history of German drama since the end of the eighteenth century as well as close examination of the conflicts and issues of individual dramas and films. The film segment primarily involves attending and journaling about several screenings of films shown in the context of the Munich Film Festival, which takes place during the program. Taught in German in Munich by Dr. Rebeccah Dawson.

      Return to Top

Graduate Courses
A selection of study abroad courses (taught in English) is offered for graduate credit to students who have completed their undergraduate degree. For course descriptions, see corresponding undergraduate course in the specific subject area. If interested in additional Graduate course possibilities or offerings on KIIS programs, contact Maria Canning.

ART 491 Special Studies: Individual Topics in the History of Art (3 hours) Graduate credit available
An independent course in art history for advanced, self-directed undergraduate and graduate students majoring in art, art history, or architecture. Students will participate in the ART 106 instructional activities. Each student must submit and receive prior approval of their study plan. Prerequisite/Co-requisite: ART 106 or equivalent and the consent of Dr. Smetana. Taught in Prague by Dr. Zbynek "ZB" Smetana.

MGT 305 Ethics and Critical Thinking: Business Ethics (3 hours) Graduate credit available
This course presents an examination of the administrator's social, ethical, and environmental responsibilities to his employees, customers, and the general public and other external factors which management must be cognizant of in modern society. Ethical decision making in an organization, or for that matter any setting, does not occur in a vacuum. As individuals and as managers, we formulate our ethics (the standards of "right" and "wrong" behavior that we set for ourselves) based upon a number of converging concepts, ideals and variables, including; family, peer, and religious influences, our past experiences, and our own unique value systems. When we make ethical decisions within the organizational context, many times there are situational factors and potential conflict of interest that further complicate the process. Taught in Argentina by Dr. Uyi Lawani.

MGT 316 International Management (3 hours) Graduate credit available
This course will focus on the opportunities and challenges associated with the management of organizations and business strategy in the global environment. It is designed to ensure that students gain a general overview of the process and effect of internationalization in contemporary business. The course introduces students to theories, concepts and skills relevant to managing effectively in today's global environment. Ultimately, students will be challenged to integrate the knowledge they have gained from other business core subjects and apply their accumulated knowledge to a few business case studies with global themes. Taught in Argentina by Dr. Uyi Lawani.

HIST 490 Topics: Day to Day in Ancient Greece (3 hours) Graduate or Honors credit available
What did the ancients wear? eat? hate? love? How did they spend their days and nights? How did they survive without the car, movies, texting? How did they make their money? What did they think about the good life, death, politics, sex? Why do we care? This course explores the ordinary lives of ancient Greeks— and of the Romans, Jews, and Christians who lived near them— as we wander their towns and poke our noses into what remains of their homes, temples, stores, streets. Note: any student with a 3.2 GPA or above can enroll in this course for Honors credit. Students enrolled for Honors credit will have more challenging and unconventional assignments that will require greater analytical, creative, and critical thinking skills. Taught in Greece by Dr. Christine Shea.

HCA 347/PH 469 Topics: Contemporary Global Health (3 hours) Graduate credit available
Students will explore new health discoveries and technologies as each relates to law, ethics, religion, family, international trends, cultures and economy. This course will ask students to consider the effect of decisions and practice as they relate to local communities, state, national and international implications. Topics could include but are not limited to universal health care, genetic testing, personalized prescription medications, medical marijuana, sex selection and reproductive technology, and prescription drug development and legal distribution guidelines. Students will also propose topics based on interest and current world events at the time of the class. Taught in Paris I by Dr. Dayna Seelig.

PH 469 Health & Wellness Promotion (3 hours) Graduate and Honors credit available
A cross-sectional consideration of all dimensions of wellness promotion: physical, psychological, social, spiritual, cultural and environmental. The emphasis is on the study of the balancing of different dimensions and the dynamic pursuit of holistic human needs. Students will be asked to compare and contrast the resources and legal guidelines that support or deter individuals in both the US and in France. The course will specifically explore the WHO European Healthy Cities initiative as a model for the United States. Taught in Paris I by Dr. Dayna Seelig.

HCA 459 Global Health Service-Learning Practicum Graduate credit available
The Global Health Service-Learning (GHSL) practicum opens doors for both undergraduate and graduate students in health professions such as medicine, nursing, nutrition, social work, and health administration to apply their skills alongside their Tanzanian counterparts while serving the health needs of the community. Key populations targeted by the program include the youth, HIV/AIDS patients, orphans, and a university community. The GHSL practicum can also be taken as an internship for students in health-related majors. Taught in Tanzania by Dr. William Mkanta.

HCA 347 International Health: Comparative Health Systems Graduate credit available
The course will introduce students to the main concepts of the public health field and the critical links between global health and social and economic development. Students will get an overview of the determinants of health, and how health status is measured, and students will also review the burden of disease, risk factors, and key measures to address the burden of disease in cost-effective ways. The course will cover key concepts and frameworks that are very practical in orientation. The course will be global in coverage but with an important focus on the developing world and on the health of the poor. Taught in Tanzania by Dr. Monika Sawhney.

PH 469 Topics: Maternal & Child Health Graduate credit available
This course takes a life cycle approach to understand the health issues, needs, policies, and program implications for women and children with a global perspective. Taught in Tanzania by Dr. Monika Sawhney.

PS 460 Topics in Comparative Politics: Military Rule and Its Legacy (3 hours) Graduate credit available
This course examines the relationship between the armed forces and society, with a focus in the southern cone countries of Argentina, Brazil, and Chile. Being in Argentina presents a unique opportunity for this course as more than 30,000 people are estimated to have disappeared during "el proceso" dictatorship (1976-83). Within this context, we will ask a number of questions. First, why do militaries overthrow civilian leaders? Isn't it their job to protect? Second, what do militaries do when they are in power? Do they produce different types of policies? Third, why do militaries ultimately leave power? If they have the guns, why do they exit? Finally, what difficulties arise when civilians try to hold military leaders accountable for war crimes committed during their tenure? Taught in Argentina by Dr. Shawn Schulenberg.

NUS 317 Topics: Cultural Influences Impacting Quality Healthcare Delivery Graduate credit available
This course will cover various topics including communicating in different cultures, communicating using CUS and SBAR, the variety and diversity of spiritual care with patients, healthcare delivery options (such as traditional medicine, healers, Eastern vs. Western medical approaches to healthcare), and inpatient/outpatient healthcare provision. Taught in Tanzania by Dr. Paul Clark.

NUS 317 Topics: Global Health Care Graduate Credit available
This course examines contemporary issues in global health and the political and social factors that contribute to health globally. One focus will be on current issues, such as the health problems that result from global migration with which Europe and other nations have been struggling in the past two - three years. Taught in Tanzania by Dr. Paul Clark.

      Return to Top

Health Care Administration/Public Health
HCA 347/PH 469 Topics: Contemporary Global Health (3 hours) Graduate credit available
Students will explore new health discoveries and technologies as each relates to law, ethics, religion, family, international trends, cultures and economy. This course will ask students to consider the effect of decisions and practice as they relate to local communities, state, national and international implications. Topics could include but are not limited to universal health care, genetic testing, personalized prescription medications, medical marijuana, sex selection and reproductive technology, and prescription drug development and legal distribution guidelines. Students will also propose topics based on interest and current world events at the time of the class. Taught in Paris I by Dr. Dayna Seelig.

PH 469 Health & Wellness Promotion (3 hours) Graduate and Honors credit available
A cross-sectional consideration of all dimensions of wellness promotion: physical, psychological, social, spiritual, cultural and environmental. The emphasis is on the study of the balancing of different dimensions and the dynamic pursuit of holistic human needs. Students will be asked to compare and contrast the resources and legal guidelines that support or deter individuals in both the US and in France. The course will specifically explore the WHO European Healthy Cities initiative as a model for the United States. Taught in Paris I by Dr. Dayna Seelig.

HCA 459 Global Health Service-Learning Practicum Graduate credit available
The Global Health Service-Learning (GHSL) practicum opens doors for both undergraduate and graduate students in health professions such as medicine, nursing, nutrition, social work, and health administration to apply their skills alongside their Tanzanian counterparts while serving the health needs of the community. Key populations targeted by the program include the youth, HIV/AIDS patients, orphans, and a university community. The GHSL practicum can also be taken as an internship for students in health-related majors. Taught in Tanzania by Dr. William Mkanta.

HCA 347 International Health: Comparative Health Systems Graduate credit available
The course will introduce students to the main concepts of the public health field and the critical links between global health and social and economic development. Students will get an overview of the determinants of health, and how health status is measured, and students will also review the burden of disease, risk factors, and key measures to address the burden of disease in cost-effective ways. The course will cover key concepts and frameworks that are very practical in orientation. The course will be global in coverage but with an important focus on the developing world and on the health of the poor. Taught in Tanzania by Dr. Monika Sawhney.

PH 469 Topics: Maternal & Child Health Graduate credit available
This course takes a life cycle approach to understand the health issues, needs, policies, and program implications for women and children with a global perspective. Taught in Tanzania by Dr. Monika Sawhney.

      Return to Top

History
HIST 471 Modern China (3 hours)
This is the story of the broad sweep of Chinese history from the Sage King Yao to the foundations of the People's Republic by Chairman Mao. This course will explore the history and culture of China both chronologically and topically. Certain themes will be addressed to help us underestand this ancient and complex society. We will proceed through time unfolding the development of China's political and cultural evolution, with particular attention paid to important ideas and individuals and the roles they have played in shaping both China's historical past and its dynamic present. Taught in China by Dr. Steven White.

HIST 479 Topics: Emperors & Empresses - Best & Worst (3 hours)
This course is a survey of the most important imperial leaders during the major dynastic periods of Chinese history. Beginning with Qin Shihuangdi and his Terracotta Soldiers and concluding with the last emperor, the ill-fated Puyi. We will explore both the worthy and the worthless, as well as some of the powers behind the throne. We will proceed chronologically from the Qin Dynasty to the Han, Sui, Tang, Song, and Yuan (the Mongols). We will then conclude with the last two dynasties, the Ming and the Qing, and then will try to arrive at a ranking and consensus of who were the heroes and who were the villians in Chinese imperial history. Our course will conclude with a nod to the "Peasant Emperor" Mao Ze-dong. Taught in China by Dr. Steven White.

HIST 490 / BIOL 475 Topics: Foundations of Modern Science (3 hours)
This cross-listed course examines the development of modern emphasis on four broad areas of intellectual history: the including conceptualizing Earth's place in the cosmos, the origin of modern geology, the rise of evolutionary thought, and the development of a workable model of the atom. Several Danish scientists played key roles in the development of these ideas: Tycho Brahe (astronomy), Niels Stensen (better known as Steno, geology), and Niels Bohr (physics). We visit historical and educational sites associated with these scientists including the Steno Museum (history of science), the island of Hven (where Brahe built two observatories), the Round Tower (historical observatory from the period just after Brahe), Kroppedal (museum of Danish astronomy), the Niels Bohr Institute, and Carlsberg Academy. Bohr's life and work intersected with World War II, which resulted in his escape from Denmark and work with the British mission to the Manhattan Project in the USA. We will explore sites associated with the German occupation of Denmark and attend the play "Copenhagen", which depicts Bohr's meeting with Werner Heisenberg shortly before his escape from Denmark. This cross-listed course is team-taught in Denmark by Dr. Carolyn Dupont and Dr. Malcolm Frisbie.

HIST 490 Topics: Denmark - Viking Age to Modern State (3 hours)
Though in recent times a tiny nation, Denmark has often played a pivotal role in world affairs. This course will look at the broad sweep of Danish history, concentrating heavily on the country's notorious Viking past. In this exploration, students will savor the country's rich collection of Viking sites, including restored villages, reconstructed ships, and well-stocked museums. During the second half of the course, we will examine Denmark's transition to a medieval Christian kingdom and subsequently to a modern state. In the final sessions, the course will explore life in Denmark under Nazi occupation. Taught in Denmark by Dr. Carolyn Dupont.

HIST 490 Topics: Day to Day in Ancient Greece (3 hours) Graduate or Honors credit available
What did the ancients wear? eat? hate? love? How did they spend their days and nights? How did they survive without the car, movies, texting? How did they make their money? What did they think about the good life, death, politics, sex? Why do we care? This course explores the ordinary lives of ancient Greeks— and of the Romans, Jews, and Christians who lived near them— as we wander their towns and poke our noses into what remains of their homes, temples, stores, streets. Note: any student with a 3.2 GPA or above can enroll in this course for Honors credit. Students enrolled for Honors credit will have more challenging and unconventional assignments that will require greater analytical, creative, and critical thinking skills. Taught in Greece by Dr. Christine Shea.

HIST 322 Age of Enlightenment (3 hours)
Beginning in the 17th century and developing full in the 18th century, the Enlightenment had a dramatic impact on life in the Western world. Enlightenment thinkers questioned and challenged accepted norms and practices in a variety of ways; from art to music to religion, and government. This course examines ideas of the Enlightenment thinkers as they relate to education, nature, gender roles, economics, government, religion, and other areas of thought. We place the Enlightenment in a larger historical context by discussing the Scientific Revolution that came before the Enlightenment and the American and French Revolutions that followed. Taught in Paris I by Dr. Paul Frazier.

HIST 490 Topics: The World Wars (3 hours)
The 20th century was by far the most violent century in human history. Much of that violence had its origins in ideas and events of the 19th century. This course will examine the ideologies and geo-political events that led to World War I and World War II. In addition we will examine the diplomatic situation just prior to both wars and the major battles, leaders, and technological developments of the wars themselves. This course combines cultural, diplomatic, and military history to help students better understand the World Wars and their impact on modern history. Taught in Paris I by Dr. Paul Frazier.

      Return to Top

Honors Courses
Any student with a 3.2 GPA or above can enroll in these courses for Honors credit. Students enrolled for Honors credit will have more challenging and unconventional assignments that will require greater analytical, creative, and critical thinking skills. If interested in an Honors Augmentation on KIIS programs, contact Maria Canning.

ART 105 History of Art to 1300 (3 hours) Honors credit available
Experiential comparative analysis of selected key works and monuments of cultures before 1300 that have left their imprint on Italy, using site visits and museum collections. With the arts of Imperial Rome as our unifying core we will examine Etruscan precedents and differences; Roman uses of an Egyptian Other and their ambivalent relationship to Classical Greek art; and echoes of Rome in Christian art and the medieval Italian city-states. Themes across cultures will include art as a materialization of spiritual or worldly power in funerary art, ancestors and afterlives; in shrines and images of holy powers; and in secular power relations like ruler imagery and gendered imagery. Note: any student with a 3.2 GPA or above can enroll in this course for Honors credit. Students enrolled for Honors credit will have more challenging and unconventional assignments that will require greater analytical, creative, and critical thinking skills. Taught in Italy by Dr. Alice Christ.

ENG 396 Mythology (3 hours) or RELS 399 Study Abroad: Greek Myth in Context (3 hours) Honors credit available
This is a cross-listed course. No stories contain greater richness and depth and none have been more influential than those we call "Greek myths." In this cross-listed course students learn important ancient Greek tales while visiting sites in which many of these myths are said to have taken place—Athens, Eleusis, Delos, Delphi, Argos, and Mycenae. Meanwhile, students learn to read these tales as represented in Greek art—on vases and in sculpture that we view. Note: any student with a 3.2 GPA or above can enroll in this course for Honors credit. Students enrolled for Honors credit will have more challenging and unconventional assignments that will require greater analytical, creative, and critical thinking skills. Taught in Greece by Dr. Richard King.

HIST 490 Topics: Day to Day in Ancient Greece (3 hours) Graduate or Honors credit available
What did the ancients wear? eat? hate? love? How did they spend their days and nights? How did they survive without the car, movies, texting? How did they make their money? What did they think about the good life, death, politics, sex? Why do we care? This course explores the ordinary lives of ancient Greeks— and of the Romans, Jews, and Christians who lived near them— as we wander their towns and poke our noses into what remains of their homes, temples, stores, streets. Note: any student with a 3.2 GPA or above can enroll in this course for Honors credit. Students enrolled for Honors credit will have more challenging and unconventional assignments that will require greater analytical, creative, and critical thinking skills. Taught in Greece by Dr. Christine Shea.

MUS 277 Introduction to World Music (3 hours) Honors credit available
This course explores the ways that music is both shaped by and gives shape to the cultural settings in which it is performed through studying selected musical traditions from around the world. With particular emphasis placed on the musical traditions of Argentina and Latin America, specific case studies will be examined closely through experiencing, researching, and analyzing the music firsthand in local settings. As a class, we will develop strategies for understanding and discussing a wide range of musical traditions. Note: any student with a 3.2 GPA or above can enroll in this course for Honors credit. Students enrolled for Honors credit will have more challenging and unconventional assignments that will require greater analytical, creative, and critical thinking skills. Taught in Argentina by Dr. Sarah Crocker.

MUS 338 Topics: Music and Dance in Latin America (3 hours) Honors credit available
This course examines the diverse music and dance styles in Latin America, which have become symbols of national identity for many countries. Focusing primarily on in-depth case studies of the Argentinian tango and the Brazilian samba, students will have the opportunity to explore Argentina as an ethnomusicologist, researching traditional, popular, and classical music and dance in local settings as part of this experiential course. Further study of how these styles were influenced by large European immigrant populations and African culture, as well as the diaspora of Latin American music and dance in America will also be explored. Note: any student with a 3.2 GPA or above can enroll in this course for Honors credit. Students enrolled for Honors credit will have more challenging and unconventional assignments that will require greater analytical, creative, and critical thinking skills. Taught in Argentina by Dr. Sarah Crocker.

PH 469 Health & Wellness Promotion (3 hours) Graduate and Honors credit available
A cross-sectional consideration of all dimensions of wellness promotion: physical, psychological, social, spiritual, cultural and environmental. The emphasis is on the study of the balancing of different dimensions and the dynamic pursuit of holistic human needs. Students will be asked to compare and contrast the resources and legal guidelines that support or deter individuals in both the US and in France. The course will specifically explore the WHO European Healthy Cities initiative as a model for the United States. Taught in Paris I by Dr. Dayna Seelig.


      Return to Top

Internships & Service-Learning
The Internship & Service-Learning courses below are open to undergraduate and graduate. Additional international internships may be available. Contact the KIIS office at 270-745-4416 or kiis@wku.edu.

HCA 459 Global Health Service-Learning Practicum (3-6 hours)
The Global Health Service-Learning (GHSL) practicum opens doors for both undergraduate and graduate students in health professions such as medicine, nursing, nutrition, social work, and health administration to apply their skills alongside their Tanzanian counterparts while serving the health needs of the community. Key populations targeted by the program include the youth, HIV/AIDS patients, orphans, and a university community. The GHSL practicum can also be taken as an internship for students in health-related majors. Taught in Tanzania by Dr. William Mkanta.

      Return to Top

Italian
ITAL 105 Introduction Italian Culture: La Dolce Vita (3 hours)
What is the "real" Italy? Is there a true representation of the Italian experience? How does it differ for different people in different places? This course focuses on Italian cultural experiences, exploring daily life in a variety of spaces, as well as interrogating some of the stereotypes about Italy and Italians. We will explore major aspects of contemporary Italian life: cafe culture, markets, social life, sports and fandom, car culture, celebrity, politics, cuisine, film/celebrity, and religion, among others. Taught in English in Italy by Prof. Lynda Mercer.

      Return to Top

Japanese
JAPN 115 Introduction to Japanese Culture (3 hours)
This course will survey Japanese popular culture in contemporary Japan, with consideration to Japanese history dating back to the Edo period. Many facets of Japanese popular culture will be reviewed, including anime, film, manga, and music. Students will read interdisciplinary scholarly articles and research, and will engage in various methods for studying and writing about the relationship between the processes of globalization, everyday life, and the enjoyment of consuming pop culture products. In addition, students will apply theoretical models to their firsthand experience of Japanese popular culture and critically analyze some of the functions that products of popular culture provide from the perspectives of gender, historical context, as well as via symbolic meanings that have risen from representations and practices. Taught in English in Japan by Prof. Kendra Sheehan.

JAPN 210: Intermediate Japanese Conversation Abroad (3 hours)
A course designed to develop the vocabulary and oral communication skills of the student with a background of one year of college Japanese or equivalent. Emphasis is placed on bringing the student into contact with Japanese native speakers and various aspects of their culture. Taught in Japanese in Japan by Prof. Yoko Hatakeyama.

      Return to Top

Latin American Studies
PS 460 Topics in Comparative Politics: Military Rule and Its Legacy (3 hours) Graduate credit available
This course examines the relationship between the armed forces and society, with a focus in the southern cone countries of Argentina, Brazil, and Chile. Being in Argentina presents a unique opportunity for this course as more than 30,000 people are estimated to have disappeared during "el proceso" dictatorship (1976-83). Within this context, we will ask a number of questions. First, why do militaries overthrow civilian leaders? Isn't it their job to protect? Second, what do militaries do when they are in power? Do they produce different types of policies? Third, why do militaries ultimately leave power? If they have the guns, why do they exit? Finally, what difficulties arise when civilians try to hold military leaders accountable for war crimes committed during their tenure? Taught in Argentina by Dr. Shawn Schulenberg.

MUS 338 Topics: Music and Dance in Latin America (3 hours) Honors credit available
This course examines the diverse music and dance styles in Latin America, which have become symbols of national identity for many countries. Focusing primarily on in-depth case studies of the Argentinian tango and the Brazilian samba, students will have the opportunity to explore Argentina as an ethnomusicologist, researching traditional, popular, and classical music and dance in local settings as part of this experiential course. Further study of how these styles were influenced by large European immigrant populations and African culture, as well as the diaspora of Latin American music and dance in America will also be explored. Note: any student with a 3.2 GPA or above can enroll in this course for Honors credit. Students enrolled for Honors credit will have more challenging and unconventional assignments that will require greater analytical, creative, and critical thinking skills. Taught in Argentina by Dr. Sarah Crocker.

ICSR 301 Seminar: Immigration & Social Justice (3 hours)
Utilizing a creative and multi-media approach, this course is designed to assist students in understanding the history and current state of immigration within the United States. This course will facilitate participatory and experiential teaching and learning implemented to help students engage in "real life" experiences tied to the many social and institutional inequities faced by the immigrant communities. Students will engage with organizations, leaders, activists and the creative arts to building a tool-kit of resources, information, and opportunities designed to raise awareness and advocate for changes to immigration, educational and economic policies impacting immigrant and migrant communities. Comparative studies will connect the complexities of immigration issues to indigenous and civil rights history, for-profit prison systems, educational inequities, poverty, and transnational trade and migration. Taught in Costa Rica by Prof. Erin Howard.

LAS 200 Intro to Latin American Studies (3 hours)
This course is intended to provide an interdisciplinary introduction to the study of the culture and societies of Latin America. Students gain an understanding of the major processes that have shaped Latin America in the past and continue to affect the region today. Course themes include the pre-Columbian past, the legacy of Spanish and Portuguese rule, the period of Independence, economic and political development, urbanization, migration, relations with the United States, and contemporary Latin American cultural diversity. This course is a foundational course for students in Latin American Studies. Students registering for this interdisciplinary course may select either SPAN 200, GEOG 200, HIST 200, or PS 200. Taught in Costa Rica by Prof. Erin Howard.

GWS 470/SOCL 489 Gender in Latin America (3 hours)
This course explores the role of women in Modern Latin America. The social construction of gender is explored through an examination of women’s use of the role and label of mother as a platform for political participation and social activism. The intersection of gender with class, race and ethnicity will be explored through an examination of human rights struggles and environmental activism. Taught in Merida, Mexico by Dr. Kimberly Pitts.

      Return to Top

Leadership Studies
LEAD 475 Leadership Studies Topics: Leading in Diverse and Global Environments (3 hours)
This course will explore leading in both diverse and global environments. Students will gain an appreciation for the importance of understanding global diversity, experiences, and viewpoints. This course looks at the many issues involved in leading in these dynamic contexts by examining concepts such as race, ethnicity, sexual orientation, gender, identity, prejudice and privilege, worldviews, culture, the roles of government, legal formalities, and foreign language acquisition. Upon completion of this course, students will understand issues of intercultural leadership and communication and build their capacities and skills for leading in diverse and global contexts. Attention will also be given to dimensions of cross-cultural interactions in organizational behavior. Taught in Austria by Dr. Jeffrey Zimmerman.

      Return to Top

Management
MGT 316 International Management (3 hours) Graduate credit available
This course will focus on the opportunities and challenges associated with the management of organizations and business strategy in the global environment. It is designed to ensure that students gain a general overview of the process and effect of internationalization in contemporary business. The course introduces students to theories, concepts and skills relevant to managing effectively in today's global environment. Ultimately, students will be challenged to integrate the knowledge they have gained from other business core subjects and apply their accumulated knowledge to a few business case studies with global themes. Taught in Argentina by Dr. Uyi Lawani.

MGT 305 Ethics and Critical Thinking: Business Ethics (3 hours) Graduate credit available
This course presents an examination of the administrator's social, ethical, and environmental responsibilities to his employees, customers, and the general public and other external factors which management must be cognizant of in modern society. Ethical decision making in an organization, or for that matter any setting, does not occur in a vacuum. As individuals and as managers, we formulate our ethics (the standards of "right" and "wrong" behavior that we set for ourselves) based upon a number of converging concepts, ideals and variables, including; family, peer, and religious influences, our past experiences, and our own unique value systems. When we make ethical decisions within the organizational context, many times there are situational factors and potential conflict of interest that further complicate the process. Taught in Argentina by Dr. Uyi Lawani.

MGT 303 International Business (3 hours)
The goal of this course is to train future U.S. business managers to understand the differences in cultures, economic systems, and business practices in the global marketplace. This course will focus on the fundamentals of international business, particularly in planning, organizing, and control aspects of the multinational enterprises. Roles of government, culture, foreign currency, taxes, political risk, and legal formalities for small and large firms entering new markets are emphasized. Comprehensive discussions and analysis of international business will be facilitated in the environment where international businesses compete. The course will also focus on a number of timely international issues and developments, such as the formation of the European Union (EU), the recent expansion of the EU, and the strategic role of Austria in the EU. Taught in Austria by Dr. Philip Seagraves.

      Return to Top

Modern Languages (see Chinese, German, French, Japanese, Italian, Spanish, Swahili)

      Return to Top

Music
MUS 277 Introduction to World Music (3 hours) Honors credit available
This course explores the ways that music is both shaped by and gives shape to the cultural settings in which it is performed through studying selected musical traditions from around the world. With particular emphasis placed on the musical traditions of Argentina and Latin America, specific case studies will be examined closely through experiencing, researching, and analyzing the music firsthand in local settings. As a class, we will develop strategies for understanding and discussing a wide range of musical traditions. Note: any student with a 3.2 GPA or above can enroll in this course for Honors credit. Students enrolled for Honors credit will have more challenging and unconventional assignments that will require greater analytical, creative, and critical thinking skills. Taught in Argentina by Dr. Sarah Crocker.

MUS 338 Topics: Music and Dance in Latin America (3 hours) Honors credit available
This course examines the diverse music and dance styles in Latin America, which have become symbols of national identity for many countries. Focusing primarily on in-depth case studies of the Argentinian tango and the Brazilian samba, students will have the opportunity to explore Argentina as an ethnomusicologist, researching traditional, popular, and classical music and dance in local settings as part of this experiential course. Further study of how these styles were influenced by large European immigrant populations and African culture, as well as the diaspora of Latin American music and dance in America will also be explored. Note: any student with a 3.2 GPA or above can enroll in this course for Honors credit. Students enrolled for Honors credit will have more challenging and unconventional assignments that will require greater analytical, creative, and critical thinking skills. Taught in Argentina by Dr. Sarah Crocker.

MUS 200 Music Theory III (3 hours)
A continuation of the study of harmony and form in music, Theory III explores modulation, binary and ternary forms, modal mixture, and the Neapolitan chord through written work and examples in the literature. Concepts are further reinforced by musicianship studies in melodic and harmonic dictation, rhythmic reading, and singing. Performances of works where modal mixture and Neapolitan chords are a notable feature (e.g. Schubert's "Im Dorfe" and "Erlkonig," Mozart's K.542 Piano Trio and K.545 Piano Sonata, and Chopin's op.7 Mazurka no.2) will be sought out in Salzburg (Mozarteum, Kirchenmusik in der Stiftskirche St. Peter, and Salzburg Palace Concerts) as well as in Vienna, Munich, and other nearby cities. Taught in Salzburg by Dr. Mike D'Ambrosio.

MUS 326 History I (3 hours)
This course will focus on the historical and musical aspects of composers from the Antiquity to late Classical periods, with special emphasis on those with a strong connection to Austria. Throughout the course, students will be familiarized with the lives and works of important composers and musicians that shaped the society of early Europe. The class will focus on the survey of repertoire, as well on composer's biographical facts and historical characteristic of European society during that time. Taught in Salzburg by Prof. Bradley Kerns.

MUS 338 Directed Study: Instrumental & Choral Conducting (3 hours)
Instrumental and Choral conducting develops the conducting technique of the musician through analysis and score study, individual and group exercises, study of conduction drills, individual works and excerpts, individual "podium" time for conducting and rehearsing, and self-evaluation of videotaped exercises. The student works toward the refinement of controlled 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 patterns and their subdivisions, the polishing of basic techniques including preparations, cut-offs, cues, fermate, dynamics, articulations, changes of tempo, irregular meters and expressive gesture. Emphasis is placed on the continued development of left hand techniques for dynamics, cues and phrases. In addition, the student fosters the development of score study and preparation skills, ear training and evaluation skills and the development of rehearsal technique and organization. Taught in Salzburg by Prof. Scot Buzza.

MUS 338 Directed Study: History of Jazz (3 hours)
Students will gain and demonstrate knowledge of Jazz History in both America and Europe. Students will study the influence of this American art form on European music. Students will compare and perform stylistic differences of the following: Jazz Roots-New Orleans, Ragtime, and Dixieland (1900-1930); Big Band Swing (1930s); Bebop (1940s); Cool, Hard Bop, and Modal Jazz (1950s); Avant Garde/Free Jazz (1960-1990); Jazz Today (1990-2000+). Students will experience jazz performances in Salzburg and Paris (the Paris weekend excursion is optional). Taught in Salzburg by Prof. Bradley Kerns.

MUS 338: Directed Study: Form & Analysis (3 hours)
Form and Analysis develops aural and written skills for analyzing how structural functions delineate musical form. The courses introduce structural functions in the context of short examples and apply these to understanding classical forms: binary, ternary, sonata, rondo, variation, and imitative forms. Emphasis is placed on contextual listening and connecting intuitive perceptions with an analytical framework that develops the student's ability to hear and write effectively about musical structure. Taught in Salzburg by Dr. Mark Zanter.

MUS 338 Directed Study: Improvisation (3 hours)
In the course students will study improvisation through readings, score study, participation in group improvisation, and by attending performances that feature improvisation. The course will provide an overview of historical and modern practices; survey notational practices; study scores employing improvisation, aleatory, or indeterminacy; improvise using Butch Morris' Conduction, and Walter Thompson's Sound-painting; and attend concerts of that feature improvisation. The Salzburg site affords an array of musical offerings where students can attend concerts of historical, and modern music employing improvisation. Some concert schedules will be available in the months preceding the study abroad experience, which will facilitate advance planning. Taught in Salzburg by Dr. Mark Zanter.

MUS 338 Directed Study: Diction for Voice Majors (3 hours)
Review of the use of the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) and its application to German and Italian: the languages of Mozart's operas. Students will learn to correctly and consistently form vowel and consonant sounds when speaking and singing in German and Italian. Students will also learn to correctly and consistently transcribe German and Italian texts into IPA. Students will perform multiple times in class, in both German and Italian. Students will sing their songs and arias from memory and supply IPA transcriptions of the texts. Students will also submit listening reports that provide critical analysis of singers' German and Italian diction heard in live performances. Taught in Salzburg by Dr. Kimberly Gelbwasser.

MUS 430 Music Literature: Mozart's Final Years (3 hours)
This course consists of historical and advanced theoretical study of several glorious works from the last seven years of Mozart's life, including his last two symphonies (no. 40 and no.41 "Jupiter"), his String Quartet no. 19 ("Dissonance"), and portions of the Requiem. Free from the restraints of patronage, Mozart's genius shines through most brightly with these late works, all composed while Mozart lived in Vienna. Especially appropriate for those preparing for graduate study, this course will help students develop score study skills and reinforce almost every topic covered in the traditional music theory sequence, all while peering "under the hood" of some of the finest music ever composed. Visiting the Mozarthaus, Schonbrunn Palace Theater, and St. Stephen's Cathedral in Vienna will provide context for this portion of Mozart's life, and attending performances of Mozart's music in and around Salzburg will be fundamental to the course. Taught in Salzburg by Dr. Mike D'Ambrosio.

MUS 430 Music Literature: Mozart's Operas (3 hours)
Musical and historical analysis of Mozart's operas in the locations where they were composed and premiered. Students will explore the development of Mozart's operas from his early years in Salzburg to his late years in Vienna. Through score study, readings, videos, and excursions in Salzburg and Vienna, students will examine Mozart's works in the context of his life, and the culture of the place in which he was born and worked. Students will have opportunities to attend live performances of numerous Mozart operas both within Salzburg, at the historical Landestheater and the Mozarteum, as well as on trips to nearby Vienna, Munich, and Linz. Taught in Salzburg by Dr. Kimberly Gelbwasser.

* KIIS Salzburg Choral Ensemble (no credit)
Singers and instrumentalists will have the opportunity for public performances of choral repertoire in order to supplement material covered in the Conducting class, as well as in Orchestral and Choral Literature. In this extra-curricular ensemble appropriate works are chosen, studied, rehearsed and performed in several Austrian concert venues. Taught in Salzburg by multiple faculty members.

      Return to Top

Nursing
NUS 317 Topics: Cultural Influences Impacting Quality Healthcare Delivery Graduate credit available
This course will cover various topics including communicating in different cultures, communicating using CUS and SBAR, the variety and diversity of spiritual care with patients, healthcare delivery options (such as traditional medicine, healers, Eastern vs. Western medical approaches to healthcare), and inpatient/outpatient healthcare provision. Taught in Tanzania by Dr. Paul Clark.

NUS 317 Topics: Global Health Care Graduate Credit available
This course examines contemporary issues in global health and the political and social factors that contribute to health globally. One focus will be on current issues, such as the health problems that result from global migration with which Europe and other nations have been struggling in the past two - three years. Taught in Tanzania by Dr. Paul Clark.

      Return to Top

Political Science
PS 460 Topics in Comparative Politics: Military Rule and Its Legacy (3 hours) Graduate credit available
This course examines the relationship between the armed forces and society, with a focus in the southern cone countries of Argentina, Brazil, and Chile. Being in Argentina presents a unique opportunity for this course as more than 30,000 people are estimated to have disappeared during "el proceso" dictatorship (1976-83). Within this context, we will ask a number of questions. First, why do militaries overthrow civilian leaders? Isn't it their job to protect? Second, what do militaries do when they are in power? Do they produce different types of policies? Third, why do militaries ultimately leave power? If they have the guns, why do they exit? Finally, what difficulties arise when civilians try to hold military leaders accountable for war crimes committed during their tenure? Taught in Argentina by Dr. Shawn Schulenberg.

PS 250 International Politics (3 hours)
We will look at Spain and Europe as a case study for the analysis of key concepts in International Relations (IR), such as the global and the local, globalization and cultural identity, immigration, democracy and repression, among others. Students will explore places and people, take photographs and make videos in search for coherent visual portraits of contemporary international politics. To that effect, the course will consist of on-line readings and forum debates, classroom lectures and debates, as well as excursions in Spain.  The course is also designed to acquaint students with basic theories, terminology, motivations, inter-relationships and problems on an international scale.
Taught in Spain May by Dr. Guilherme Silva

      Return to Top

Psychology
PSY 299 Topics: Good & Evil - Psychology & Holocaust (3 hours)
The Holocaust was a great tragedy of the modern era. One question that is still asked today is "How could people commit such atrocities?" This class explores how normal people can do terrible things. We will learn about effects of authority and the forces that drive us to obey, the urge to conform, the power of out-groups and the dehumanization of the other. We will also examine the factors that affected those who risked their lives to protect their neighbors, or complete strangers, from the Nazi regime... heroism in the worst of circumstances. We will study the conditions and components of human good, with a particular focus on understanding empathy. We will finish with a better understanding of the psychology that drove this period in history. Team taught in Austria by Dr. Myra Beth Bundy and Prof. Thomas Reece.

PSY 299 Topics: Freud & Psychoanalysis (3 hours)
Psychology as an independent discipline began in the German speaking world and perhaps one of the most notorious figures in the field of psychology is Sigmund Freud. Freud's views have permeated popular culture, are often controversial, and sometimes misunderstood. This course explores Freud's life, Freud's views, the psychoanalytic approach, and even Freud as a character in fiction. We will also study some of theories developed by Freud's students as they rejected or modified aspects of Freudian psychoanalysis, ultimately leading up to what is now called psychodynamic psychology. Along with learning about psychoanalytic theory itself, we will be paying special attention to the historical and cultural context in which it developed. Taught in Austria by Dr. Myra Beth Bundy.

PSY 355 Issues in Cross-Cultural Psychology (3 hours)
How are we different and how are we the same? This is one of the big questions in psychology and it is one of the biggest questions in the area of cross-cultural psychology. Culture shapes how we see the world and how we interact with it. This course examines the impact of culture on major principles, theories, and applications of psychology, including social behavior, gender, communication, development and abnormal psychology. Through interacting with the course material, each other, and our travels throughout Austria and Europe, we will have a better understanding of ourselves and others as cultural entities. Taught in Austria by Prof. Thomas Reece.

PSY 299 Topics: Gender Stereotypes and Equality (3 hours)
This course explores developmental and social psychological research on gender stereotypes. Scandinavia ranks at the top in the world for gender equality. They are the benchmark for equal political and economic balance between men and women (unlike the U.S.). In that context, we will explore how, when, and why children develop gender stereotypes, the implications of gender stereotypes on relationships (with friends and romantic partners), academic outcomes, and occupations. We will also explore HOW Denmark achieves gender equality. We take excursions into the local area to explore and document how gender is used in society. We examine how gender is used in schools and interview local residents about their attitudes about gender. We explore how segregation, media, and parenting impact gender stereotypes, and how social policies and cultural attitudes can shape stereotypes. We compare and contrast the use of gender in Denmark to that of the U.S. For a grade, this course has a primary writing assignment, a series of journal entries, and a multimedia project based on the readings and excursions. Taught in Denmark by Dr. Christia Kearns.

PSY 299 Topics: Islamophobia - Prejudice and Tolerance in Demark (3 hours)
This course explores social psychological research on anti-Muslim stereotypes. It explores how, when, and why children develop stereotypes about ethnic and religious groups, with a focus on Muslims and Islamophobia. It explores research on immigration and how segregation impacts stereotypes. It also explores the role of media in perpetuating stereotypes. We read social psychology research articles, and examine artifacts documenting Islamophobia. We examine Denmark's immigration history, Danish attitudes toward Muslim immigrants, and explore how segregation and media impact anti-Muslim stereotypes and prejudice. For a grade, this course has a primary writing assignment, a series of journal entries, and a multimedia project based on the readings and excursions. Taught in Denmark by Dr. Christia Kearns.

      Return to Top

Public Health
HCA 347/PH 469 Topics: Contemporary Global Health (3 hours) Graduate credit available
Students will explore new health discoveries and technologies as each relates to law, ethics, religion, family, international trends, cultures and economy. This course will ask students to consider the effect of decisions and practice as they relate to local communities, state, national and international implications. Topics could include but are not limited to universal health care, genetic testing, personalized prescription medications, medical marijuana, sex selection and reproductive technology, and prescription drug development and legal distribution guidelines. Students will also propose topics based on interest and current world events at the time of the class. Taught in Paris I by Dr. Dayna Seelig.

PH 469 Health & Wellness Promotion (3 hours) Graduate and Honors credit available
A cross-sectional consideration of all dimensions of wellness promotion: physical, psychological, social, spiritual, cultural and environmental. The emphasis is on the study of the balancing of different dimensions and the dynamic pursuit of holistic human needs. Students will be asked to compare and contrast the resources and legal guidelines that support or deter individuals in both the US and in France. The course will specifically explore the WHO European Healthy Cities initiative as a model for the United States. Taught in Paris I by Dr. Dayna Seelig.

PH 469 Topics: Maternal & Child Health Graduate credit available
This course takes a life cycle approach to understand the health issues, needs, policies, and program implications for women and children with a global perspective. Taught in Tanzania by Dr. Monika Sawhney.

      Return to Top

Philosophy/Religious Studies
RELS 399 Study Abroad: Greek Myth in Context (3 hours) or ENG 396 Mythology (3 hours) Honors credit available
This is a cross-listed course. No stories contain greater richness and depth and none have been more influential than those we call "Greek myths." In this cross-listed course students learn important ancient Greek tales while visiting sites in which many of these myths are said to have taken place—Athens, Eleusis, Delos, Delphi, Argos, and Mycenae. Meanwhile, students learn to read these tales as represented in Greek art—on vases and in sculpture that we view. Note: any student with a 3.2 GPA or above can enroll in this course for Honors credit. Students enrolled for Honors credit will have more challenging and unconventional assignments that will require greater analytical, creative, and critical thinking skills. Taught in Greece by Dr. Richard King.

RELS 305 History of Christianity (3 hours)
This interdisciplinary course traces the process which led to the establishment of the Greek New Testament. We will examine where the early Greek documents were found as well as some introductory material on the language and people who contributed to its formation. We will look at religious and political concerns such as the church fathers and councils that eventually led to the forming of the New Testament canon. The travel itinerary includes historic sites of involving the origins of some New Testament documents—especially Corinth and Athens. Students will be introduced to textual criticism, Koine Greek, geography of the text families, and biographical and historical details relating to the New Testament from early texts to English translations. Students do not need to know Koine Greek. Taught in Greece by Prof. Steven Watkins.

RELS 399 Topics: Paul's Greek Influence on Early Christianity (3 hours)
This interdisciplinary course surveys Primary and Secondary sources involving St. Paul's Greek influence on early Christianity. Readings include samplings from the New Testament, such as the Corinthian Epistles, as well as secondary scholarly appraisals of the Pauline corpus. Greek culture in the Hellenistic and Roman periods will also be a focus of study. The course explores the interplay of cultures—Jewish, Roman and Greek—as Paul carried Christianity into Asia Minor and Greece. This course is interdisciplinary and will include art, architecture, sculpture, iconography and mosaics and well as archaeological evidence of the subjects at hand. Taught in Greece by Prof. Steven Watkins.

RELS 399 Study Abroad: Buddhism in Japan (3 hours)
This course offers an introduction to the ideas, imagery, institutions, and practices of Buddhism in Japan, including its relationships with Confucian, Daoist, and Shinto traditions. Through analysis of hagiographical, ritual, and scriptural texts (in English translation), examination of art and architecture, and visits to religious sites and museum collections, students will develop a basic understanding of the unity and diversity of Buddhist spirituality in Japan. Taught in Japan by Dr. Jeff Richey.

RELS 399 Study Abroad: Religion in Japanese Literature (3 hours)
This course offers an introduction to religious themes, motifs, and settings found in Japanese literature from antiquity to the present. Through the close and contextual reading of diaries, dramas, novels, poems, and short stories (in English translation), students will develop a basic understanding of the unity and diversity of Japanese spirituality. Taught in Japan by Dr. Jeff Richey.

      Return to Top

Sociology
GWS 470/SOCL 489 Gender in Latin America (3 hours)
This course explores the role of women in Modern Latin America. The social construction of gender is explored through an examination of women’s use of the role and label of mother as a platform for political participation and social activism. The intersection of gender with class, race and ethnicity will be explored through an examination of human rights struggles and environmental activism. Taught in Merida, Mexico by Dr. Kimberly Pitts.

SOCL 270 Introduction to Community, Environment and Development (3 hours)
This course examines the causes, dynamics, and consequences of socio-economic changes in the Mayan communities of Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula. It begins with a cultural-historical perspective of conquest and colonialization particularly focusing on religious syncretism. The change of community is further explored through an examination of the importance of corn in Mayan culture and the effect of NAFTA on Mexican farmers. The consequences of globalization are further considered in the Mayan fight against the use of genetically modified crops that threaten to affect honey production and destroy the livelihood of thousands of families in the community. International development and labor are explored through henequen factory and the maquiladora industry. This class takes an historical perspective in examining the modern Mayan world. Taught in Merida, Mexico by Dr. Kimberly Pitts.

      Return to Top

Spanish
SPAN 102 Elementary Spanish II (3 hours)
Conversational Spanish in the Costa Rican cultural context. Practice in basic language skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Emphasis is placed on the development of communicative proficiency. Students will complete brief interviews and written homework, group projects, and class discussions in basic Spanish. By the end of this class students should speak more fluidly, have a stronger vocabulary, and should be able to better comprehend Spanish conversation. In addition to the improvement in language skills, students will have a better understanding of the social and political situation in Costa Rica and the region. Taught in Spanish in Costa Rica by Dr. Genny Ballard.

SPAN 201 Intermediate Spanish I (3 hours)
Through the coursework, experience abroad, and cultural encounters, this course will cultivate communicative skills and cultural awareness to prepare our students to be more knowledgeable and sensitive citizens of the global community. 
This course will further develop the speaking, writing, reading and listening comprehension of the students benefiting from the immersion aspect of a study abroad. Students will review Spanish grammar, and practice written and oral expression in a task-based instruction model. Students will read a variety of texts in Spanish, many of which will be chosen to supplement what the students will be experiencing in Merida. This will promote the application of critical reading skills and will provide the basis for discussion of the cultural traditions of the country and the contributions made by them. The goal for this course is to achieve the Intermediate Low rating on the ACTFL proficiency scale. Taught in Spanish in Merida, Mexico by Dr. Iulia Sprinceana.

SPAN 202 Intermediate Spanish II (3 hours)
Through the coursework, experience abroad, and cultural encounters, this course will cultivate communicative skills and cultural awareness to prepare our students to be more knowledgeable and sensitive citizens of the global community. 
This course will further develop the speaking, writing, reading and listening comprehension of the students benefiting from the immersion aspect of a study abroad. Students will review Spanish grammar, and practice written and oral expression in a task-based instruction model. Students will read a variety of texts in Spanish, many of which will be chosen to supplement what the students will be experiencing in Merida. This will promote the application of critical reading skills and will provide the basis for discussion of the cultural traditions of the country and the contributions made by them. The goal for this course is that students achieve the Intermediate Mid rating on the ACTFL proficiency scale. Taught in Spanish in Merida, Mexico by Dr. Iulia Sprinceana.

SPAN 372 Latin American Civilization and Culture (3 hours)
This course is a survey of the historical and cultural background of Latin America and its people from the Discovery to the present. However this class will center in the indigenous influence in Latin American countries, particularly the Mayan cultural heritage in south of Mexico and Central America. Taught in Spanish in Merida, Mexico by Dr. Itzà Zavala-Garrett.

SPAN 105 Introduction to Hispanic Culture (3 hours)
This course, taught in English, is designed to provide students with a critical understanding of Spanish history and culture, and foster an appreciation for contemporary Spain's issues and idiosyncrasies. The course will focus on contemporary Spain: its nationalisms, economy, society and popular culture. Our approach will be based on authentic texts sites we will visit places to support some of our findings in class, and we will expand from the textbook through other forms of media (art, excursions, etc.), group presentations and class discussion. Taught in English in Spain May by Prof. Ninfa Floyd.

SPAN 306 Experiencing Spanish Abroad: Spanish Pronunciation (3 hours)
A course designed to develop language learners' abilities relating to the theory and practice of phonetics and pronunciation. Examination of phonetic system, variation, specific difficulties and inter-language/linguistic comparison. Taught in Spanish in Spain I by Dr. Regina Roebuck.

SPAN 370 Spanish Conversation (3 hours)
This conversation class, for students with at least two years of college-level Spanish or the equivalent is designed to develop greater fluency, vocabulary knowledge, and refine grammatical proficiency to master more complex communication skills (including narrating and describing with a variety of verb tenses, providing detailed explanations, expressing and supporting opinions). The course also helps students increase their awareness about different cultural characteristics of the Spanish-speaking world. Taught in Spanish in Spain I by Prof. Angela Katz and Dr. Nelson Lopez.

SPAN 371 Spanish Composition (3 hours)
A course designed to review and strengthen students' understanding and use of majors concepts of Spanish grammar as studied in context, as well as to develop students ability to write, including organization and structure, coherence, sentence structure, word choice, accentuation, etc. Taught in Spanish in Spain I by Prof. Angela Katz.

SPAN 374 Literature and Culture of Spain (3 hours)
This course will introduce students to significant works of narrative, drama, and poetry by Spanish authors from the Middle Ages to the present. Students will apply the appropriate vocabulary and concepts to analyze the literary texts within the historical and cultural contexts in which they were produced. In addition, students will further develop their oral and written Spanish, as well as their skills in reading and critical thinking. Taught in Spanish in Spain I by Dr. Nelson Lopez.

SPAN 373 Spanish Civilization and Culture (3 hours)
Survey of historical and cultural background of Spain and its people from the Roman colonization to the present. The topics are organized around a series of themes including religion, history, politics, regionalism, demography, art and architecture. The course addresses the complex historical, political and cultural identities of Spain in order to understand the country in the twenty-first century. Taught in Spanish in Spain II by Dr. Melissa Stewart.

SPAN 455 Topics: Issues in Spanish Media & Film (3 hours)
In this course, we will analyze the representations of the Spanish culture and people in the media and film to have a better understanding of its society. We will touch on different aspects of the history, politics, economy and ideologies that have shaped this region; as well as social issues such as identity, family, love, and citizenship responsibility that are being portrayed in the media. The course is meant to further develop the cultural understanding as well as the language skills. Classes will be based on the media illustrations, occasional lectures and multiple discussions. Assignments will include, but are not limited to, quizzes and exams, oral presentations and final paper. Taught in Spanish in Spain II by Dr. Sonia Lenk.

SPAN 455 Topics: The Train in Spanish Literature and Society (3 hours)
Trains have always occupied an important place in Spain's imaginary. As a key element in the industrial revolution, the train was the symbol of national progress in 19th-early 20th century literature. As a mode of transportation, it became a metaphor for change, signaling both individual and societal transformation. While travelling embodies learning, travelling by train - a perfect combination of slow and fast movement, individual and shared experience - feeds the literary imagination, allowing for self-exploration through the contact with diverse people and new environments. In this class, we will discover the symbolism and representation of trains in literary works by some of the best known Spanish authors from the 19th to the 21st centuries (such as Emilia Pardo Bazan, Antonio Machado, Buero Vallejo, Camilo Jose Cela, Ana Maria Matute...). Taught in Spanish in Spain II by Dr. Carmen Arranz Ordas.

SPAN 470: Advanced Spanish (3 hours)
The main purpose of this course is to develop greater fluency, lexical expansion, grammatical accuracy, and better pronunciation of Spanish by reading authentic texts, exploring the local community, interviewing host family members, and sharing both written and oral reports of these experiences with the class. Emphasis will be placed on vocabulary building, polishing of grammar while working to master more complex oral communication tasks (such as narrating and describing using aspects of time, giving elaborate explanation, and stating and supporting opinions concretely), and achieving more target-like pronunciation.Taught in Spanish in Spain II by Dr. Carmen Arranz Ordas & Dr. Sonia Lenk.


      Return to Top

Swahili
SWAH 101: Elementary Swahili (3 hours)
An introduction to the Swahili language and Kiswahili-speaking culture for students with little or no previous language study. Kiswahili (Swahili) is the national language of Tanzania; however, Kiswahili is not just a language, it is a national culture and continues to play an important role in shaping the culture, economy, people, and politics of Tanzania. A basic knowledge of Swahili is also meant to provide students with a better contextual understanding of the Tanzania program's other courses. Taught in Tanzania by a Local Instructor.

      Return to Top


KIIS--Western Kentucky University / 1906 College Heights Blvd #11030 / Bowling Green, KY 42101-1030 / Tel. 270-745-4416 / Fax. 270-745-4413 / kiis@wku.edu / www.kiis.org