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 Courses are taught in English, unless noted.
 Courses are 3 credit hours each, unless noted.

African American Studies

AFAM 480/HON 300: Topics: Black Paris (3 hours)
In this course, students study the history and experiences of the African diaspora in Paris from 1716 to the present. Students begin by familiarizing themselves with historical debates surrounding the condition of black slaves on French soil following the Edict of October 1716. Using Tracy Denean Sharpley-Witing's book entitled Black Venus: Sexual Savages, Primal Fears, and Primitive Narratives in French, students will further explore representations of black women in 19th century France as well as how projected French caricatures of black womanhood have been contested by various black female writers and artists. As part of the 20th century segment, students will examine the cultural and intellectual interactions among African-American, Afro-Caribbean and African artists, activists and writers in Paris. Brent Hayes book in particular, The Practice of Diaspora: literature Translation, and the rise of Black Internationalism, introduces students to the international alliances that African American writers formed in Paris as they sought refuge from racism in the United States. Other works such as Bernard Dadie's An African in Paris, Dominic Thomas' Black France: Colonialism, Immigration, and Transnational Culture as well as Alain Mabanckou's Black Bazar (among others) are used by students to analyze the politics of African immigration to France. Students are also encouraged to participate in a "Black Paris Tour" of the city where they will visit various locations that were made popular by African American writers, musicians and political exiles. Taught in Paris I by Dr. Mich Nyawalo.

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Agriculture / Agribusiness

AGEC 475-1/ECON 410: Topics: International Agribusiness Economics (3 hours) Graduate credit available
Principles of economics applied to agricultural sector at international level. The course covers global market structures for agricultural inputs and products, a review of major importers and exporters in agribusiness sector. The course includes governmental agribusiness policies, international trade organizations, and treaties, with emphasis on agribusiness issues. The course includes examination of domestic and international policies that affect world prices of food products. To enhance the course content, we closely examine Chilean case studies, environments and resources. Taught in Chile by Dr. Dominique Gumirakiza .

AGEC 475-2: International Agribusiness Marketing (3 hours) Graduate credit available
Analysis of worldwide agricultural markets, marketing practices, functions, and strategies employed by agribusiness product and service firms. Market research, market segmentation and agrimarketing mix development are included in this course. Among the topics reviewed. Students develop an international agribusiness marketing plan. To enhance the course content, we closely examine Chilean case studies, environments and resources. Taught in Chile by Dr. Dominique Gumirakiza .


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Anthropology/Archeology

ANTH 366: Topics: Archaeology of Roman Spain (3 hours)
This course explores the archaeology of ancient Rome's Iberian provinces, one of the empire's wealthiest regions. Quite literally, we will discover Roman Barcino (Barcelona) by going underground into the city's basement foundations. The course includes site and museum visits, as well as a day trip to the spectacular seaside capital of Rome's stronghold in Spain, ancient Tarragona. Taught in Barcelona by Dr. Kelli Carmean.

ANTH 366: Topics: Art and Archaeology of Ancient Greece (3 hours)
This course provides students with a survey of the major monuments and artifacts of the ancient Greek world, from the Bronze Age through the Hellenistic periods. We consider the function and significance of the monuments from both the perspective of the original Greek audience and of Western tourists who have embraced them as foundations for their own culture. The course also includes discussion of the history, terminology, and methods of classical archaeology as practiced in Greece today. Taught in Greece by Prof. Kathleen Quinn.

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Art/Art History

ART 243: Digital Media - Design Austria (3 hours)
Designing in an international creative classroom, surrounded by artistic and natural beauty, influenced by visual arts, applied design and natural beauty - this is the foundation of the amazing course! In the beautiful city of Bregenz, Austria, students will explore and experience the creative culture, venues and influence of local businesses and creative professionals, to concept and produce a variety of projects in graphics and visual arts. Visits to Kunsthaus and Vorarlberg Museums, Stefan Sagmeister Studios, the Bregenz Festival, and local creative agencies, will provide a very unique perspective and content for this international design class. And as a result, this is a perfect venue and course for students wanted to explore contemporary design concepts such as graphic design, typography, illustration, composition and advertising. Each student can expect to be inspired, challenged and provided with a fresh, deepened viewpoint of their own art, and will gain a deeper understanding of graphic design and a collection of work reflecting new skills and knowledge gained during their own Design Austria experience. Taught in Austria by Prof. Arden Von Haeger.

ART 340: Drawing III (3 hours)
To assist individuals with the continued development of their work in drawing, students will learn methods on on-site visual information gathering. Students keep a written and drawn journal/sketchbook and produce on-site drawings. To provide on-site advanced drawing instruction, students work in media they can travel with, including the use of wet and/or dry media. The material collected will be used as source material for future works. Taught in Italy by Prof. Randy Simmons.

ART 438: Advanced Graphics - Zine Branding (3 hours)
Recognized as one of the most beautiful and creative Austrian cities, Bergenz will be our classroom for this extraordinary exploration of visual and applied arts, and design. In this advanced design/illustration course, students will concept and create artistic Zines, (which are small format, works of original art, book design) utilizing graphic design, photography and illustration techniques and mediums. Capturing the magnificent Bregenz Fesival, the contemporary art of Kunsthaus Museum, the international design and branding of Stefan Sagmeister, and the beauty of Austria and nearby cities and countries, these unique hand-made books; personal collections of art, culture and experience, will become artistic masterpieces of design and art! Taught in Austria by Prof. Arden Von Haeger.

ART 491: Topics: Cultural Tourism (3 hours)
Tourism is a significant industry throughout the world. It has the power to transform communities, economies, and environments. In this course, students focus on cultural tourism, which examines the art, architecture, lifestyle, festivals, rituals and creative tourism. Utilizing case studies and field observations, students will consider how tourism and tourist practices can augment or diminish one's understanding of another's culture. Additionally, students examine the role of tourism in cultural preservation and, in some case, degradation. Taught in Paris I by Dr. Rachel Shane.

ART 491: Topics: Issues in Museum Management (3 hours)
The role of the museum in society is to conserve art and artifacts and make them available for the public through exhibitions. The first museum was believed to be in existence in 530 BC, yet modern museums still face unique challenges surrounding their purpose. This course considers museum issues including conservation and preservation; patrimony; repatriation; and deaccessioning. Through readings, research, class discussions, and museum excursions, students examine contemporary issues in museum management. Taught in Paris I by Dr. Rachel Shane.

ART 494 Seminar: Art and Christianity (3 hours)
The course considers the symbolical value and expressive power of Christian art. Our attention centers on Florence, Siena, Assisi and Rome in coordination with the program itinerary. In lectures and discussions and by visiting museums and other religious sites we seek to understand works of art and architecture in relation to liturgy, doctrine and belief. We learn about Church history and the evolution of religious practice. We also learn about artistic principles and gain a deeper appreciation for the creative impulse within historical periods. The Place-as-Text model will be utilized and students will develop critical thinking skills. Taught in Italy by Dr. Christopher Fulton.

ART 496: Topics: Documenting Change - Cuba in Transition (3 hours)
Investigate Havana with is amazing architecture, streets, squares, cars, landscape, people, museums, along with its culture of outdoor cafes, performances, and complex cultural and political history. Image and word come together in this course to document and represent a country in transition as the relationship between Cuba and the United States shifts. How do Cubans see their past, present, and future? Exploring the artistic output of Cubans over the last 60 years will provide insight to shifts in their relationship to social and political realities and a critical response to the local environment. Creating a website, blog, or portfolio of images that transcend a cursory snapshot, students will investigate the critical application of design and journalistic principles and place them into a historic context.
Team taught in Cuba by Dr. Eileen McKiernan-Gonzalez and Prof. Doreen Maloney.

ART 496: Topics: Digital Photography (3 hours)
Students will visit places of interest in the city and countryside. They will learn how to use their digital SLR camera and imaging software, preferably Adobe Photoshop, to enhance their photographic images and videos. Students enrolled in this course need to bring a laptop equipped with imaging software (details will be provided at the April KIIS Student Orientation). Taught in Italy by Prof. Randy Simmons.

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Asian Religions & Culture

ARC 401 Introduction to Chinese Civilization (3 hours)
This course is a preliminary introduction to Chinese civilization, beginning with the archaeological record and extending to the nineteen century. Considering the broad period and rich tradition we will cover, approximately three thousand years of Chinese culture, this course will focus on a few themes and a few approaches instead of providing a comprehensive survey of the history of Chinese civilization. The purpose of this course is to provide a basic understanding of the development of Chinese tradition and the complicity of its culture by looking in depth the following questions: what forces came together to produce Chinese civilization and how did they contribute to the formation of the notion of "Chineseness" over time? What were the roles of intellectual or philosophical thinkers in the development of Chinese cultural tradition? How can literature reveal details of the way people lived, the values they believed and the ideas they followed? Taught in China by Dr. Jianjun He.

ARC 401: Topics: Introduction to Anime and Manga (3 hours)
The popularity of Japanese animation (anime) and manga is increasing worldwide. This course introduces students to these contemporary forms by considering anime and manga as literary genres, medium, art, culture, and industry. We will review the history of manga and its animated from AD 1000 to the present, focusing on the period from post-WWII to the present. Both new and experienced students will explore series and topics in depth, studying the manga and anime forms and comparing them against other artistic works. Taught in Japan by Dr. Zelideth Rivas.

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Biology

BIOL 475-1: Topics: Applied Field Experiences / GEOG 452: Applied Field Experiences (3 hours) Graduate credit available
This course introduces the student to the art and science of keeping scientific field notes. First we will explore the classic book "The Voyage of the Beagle" that was based on Darwin's field notes. Secondly, we will couple this with recent writings on field journal techniques. Using these readings as models, we will examine the diversity of ecosystems and landscapes of Ecuador as an historic explorer and modern naturalist. The diversity of fauna, flora and environments in Ecuador is ideal for serving as an excellent living laboratory to discuss field method and field data recording. Taught in Ecuador by Dr. Suzanne Strait and Dr. John White.

BIOL 475-2: Field Biology: Tropical Biodiversity and Conservation (3 hours) Graduate credit available
This course introduces the student to the extraordinary variety of plants, animals, and ecosystems of tropical regions. Students observe and study the wide range of habitats in the natural regions of Ecuador (a recognized center of mega diversity). Students will have the opportunity to gain in-depth understanding of the biodiversity and conservation issues confronting societies in tropical regions by readings and first-hand observations of the natural resources and the local communities. We will utilize the natural laboratory of Ecuador to explore diverse tropical ecosystems including Andean highlands, tropical intermontaine valleys and tropical rainforests. Emphasis is on understanding biodiversity issues in the tropics and on conservation strategies needed to protect these dwindling resources. Taught in Ecuador by Dr. Suzanne Strait.

BIOL 485: Field Biology: Galapagos (1 credit hour) Graduate credit available
As we visit the famous volcanic islands situated 600 miles off Ecuador's coast in the Pacific Ocean, we will study their geologic origin and history, and explore their role in the development of evolutionary thought. We will visit several of their unique ecosystems including dry lowlands and the moister volcanic highlands, and snorkel in the rich surrounding waters. We will talk with Galapagos residents to gain a fuller understanding of the history of human occupation of the islands and the challenges ahead for preserving this fascinating archipelago. This 1-credit-hour course is open only to students who select the optional Galapagos program extension. Taught in Ecuador by Dr. Suzanne Strait.

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Business

ECON 380: International Economics (3 hours)
This course introduces the theory of international trade and monetary relations with an emphasis on the determinants of the direction, volume, terms, and gains from international trades. This course discusses the movement of goods, services, labors, and capital between countries, various economic factors that shape patterns of trade, scale of economy and monopolistic competition, trade tariffs and quotas, as well as international trade agreements. It also covers foreign exchange markets, factors that determine the foreign exchange rates, the balance of payments for national and trade accounts, and the coordination of monetary and fiscal policies in a global economy. Taught in Austria by Dr. Kevin Zhao.

AGEC 475-1/ECON 410: Topics: International Agribusiness Economics (3 hours) Graduate credit available
Principles of economics applied to agricultural sector at international level. The course covers global market structures for agricultural inputs and products, a review of major importers and exporters in agribusiness sector. The course includes governmental agribusiness policies, international trade organizations, and treaties, with emphasis on agribusiness issues. The course includes examination of domestic and international policies that affect world prices of food products. To enhance the course content, we closely examine Chilean case studies, environments and resources. Taught in Chile by Dr. Dominique Gumirakiza .

MGT 303: International Business (3 hours)
The goal of this course is to train future U.S. business managers to understand the differences in cultures, economic systems, and business practices in the global marketplace. Students gain an understanding of the international language of business and will be better prepared to discuss the worldwide aspects of each business function. Comprehensive discussions and analysis of international business will be facilitated in the environment where international businesses compete. The course also focuses on a number of timely international issues and developments, such as formation of European Union (EU), the recent expansion of EU, and the strategic role of Austria in EU. Taught in Austria a by Dr. Kevin Zhao.

MGT 305: Ethics and Critical Thinking: Business Ethics (3 hours) Graduate credit available
This course presents an examination of the administrator's social, ethical, and environmental responsibilities to his employees, customers, and the general public and other external factors which management must be cognizant of in modern society. Ethical decision making in an organization, or for that matter any setting, does not occur in a vacuum. As individuals and as managers, we formulate our ethics (the standards of "right" and "wrong" behavior that we set for ourselves) based upon a number of converging concepts, ideals and variables. These include: family, peer, and religious influences, our past experiences, and our own unique value systems. When we make ethical decisions within the organizational context, many times there are situational factors and potential conflict of interest that further complicate the process. The case method is used in this course. Students get asked the sort of questions a senior executive might ask in a staff meeting. Such questions would typically require serious preparation, effective communication, and critical thinking. We will make regular use of Chilean excursions and resources to enhance our class discussions. Taught in Chile by Dr. Uyi Lawani .

MGT 316: International Management (3 hours) Graduate credit available
This course focuses on the challenges and opportunities associated with organizational management and business strategy in the global environment. Using Chile as context, students will gain a specific overview of the process and effect of internationalization in contemporary business. Students will be introduced to theories, concepts and skills relevant to managing effectively in today's global environment. The course challenges students to integrate knowledge they have gained from other business core courses and apply their accumulated knowledge to business case studies. Students will engage in research and analytical problem solving related to managing in the international environment and will frequently be called upon to brief their findings to the class. We will make regular use of Chilean excursions and resources to enhance our class discussions. Taught in Chile by Dr. Uyi Lawani .

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Chinese

CHIN 101 Elementary Chinese I (3 hours)
This course is designed to introduce Mandarin Chinese to students who have none or very little background in the language. Students whose Chinese has exceeded the scope of the course should not take the class, unless permitted specially by the instructor. This course introduces basic knowledge about the Chinese language and develops your skills in listening, speaking, reading and writing in Mandarin Chinese. Students will learn the history of the Chinese writing system, and pinyin, the pronunciation system. Students will also learn to write Chinese characters, basic grammar structures, and the most frequently used vocabulary and expressions in real-life situations. Upon successful completion of the course, you should be able to: (1) carry out a basic face-to-face conversation and (2) write about 200 characters and read 260. By the end of the year, you should be able to: (1) carry out a simple face-to-face conversation with ease, (2) read simple stories written in the "spoken style," and (3) write a short letter or story with all the grammar and the 600 vocabulary words learned. Taught in Chinese in China by Dr. He Jianjun.

CHIN 201 Intermediate Chinese I (3 hours)
This course is designed to introduce Mandarin Chinese to students who have none or very little background in the language. This course introduces basic knowledge about the Chinese language and develops students' skills in listening, speaking, reading and writing in Mandarin Chinese. Students will learn the pinyin pronunciation system, Chinese characters, basic grammar structures, and the most frequently used vocabulary and expressions in real-life situations. Upon successful completion of the curse, students should be able to: 1) carry out a basic face-to-face conversation and 2) write about 260 characters and read 300. Taught in Chinese in China by Dr. He Jianjun.

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Communication

COMM 263: Fundamentals of Communication & Culture (3 hours)
This course examines how communication patterns are influenced by surrounding cultures and how culture is created and sustained through communication. It focuses on communication across cultural boundaries, and is designed to prepare students to effectively adapt and succeed in a contemporary world that is becoming more and more culturally diverse. Taught in Spain May by Dr. Gail Henson.

COMM 400: Topics: Digital Storytelling (3 hours)
This class explores the interactivity and narrative of digital media through the creation of audio and video projects. We will examine digital media as a tool for seeing, exploring, expressing and social critique. By analyzing digital media, we will look at the various forms of dynamic storytelling in relationship to memory and time. Issues that will be discussed include subjectivity, sequences and transitions, rhythm and repetition, interactivity and the role of the observer. Projects will incorporate locations in Barcelona and intercultural identity. Taught in Barcelona by Dr. Ann Andaloro.

COMM 463: Intercultural Communication (3 hours)
This course is designed to create an understanding of dimensions of communication theory that apply across cultural boundaries. Emphasis is placed on both theoretical and practical awareness of communication in and between cultures. This course fulfills a core requirement for Communication Studies and Corporate and Organizational Communication majors. Taught in Barcelona by Dr. Ann Andaloro.

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Criminology

SOCL 489/CRIM 489: Study Abroad: Gender and Crime in Latin America (3 hours)
This course will examine the intersection of gender roles and criminal behavior and victimization throughout the nation-state of Mexico. This will include a discussion of the drug cartels as well as corruption within the criminal justice system. The course also will examine the history of the crimes against the indigenous peoples of Mexico by the colonial powers. Taught in Mexico by Dr. Rebecca Katz.

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Education

EDU 400-1: Topics: Teaching Integrated Curriculum and Assessment for Early Childhood (3 hours)
The course is designed for students in the process of preparing to teaching young children in early childhood settings. This course fosters the development of skills and techniques in curriculum and assessment for teaching with young children. Play, child-centered practices, and observation form the foundation of learning and socialization, which invites children themselves to become partners in the learning process. When possible, students in this course will observe and implement integrated lessons in Danish sites. Taught in Denmark by Dr. Tryphina Robinson.

EDU 400-2: Topics: Family & Community Involvement in Early Childhood Programs (3 hours)
Both Brofenbrenner's Ecological Theory and the Reggio-Emilia approach to learning focus on child development within the context of caring relationships with families, classmates, teachers, school environments, communities and societies. The emphasis of this course is on the importance of communication, teaming, and the assimilation of knowledge related to family/community partnerships. Within the course, students will explore issues dealing with diversity, planning, implementing, and evaluating programs for all learners. Students will also personally observe the multiple facets of communication and strong partnerships in action by visiting Danish sites. Taught in Denmark by Dr. Tryphina Robinson.

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English

ENG 290/HON 300: Topics: Italy in Fiction and Film (3 hours)
This interdisciplinary and comparative course explores and analyses the role and representation of Italy, its places and its people, in novels and films, by native Italians as well as expatriate and foreign writers and directors. Fiction and film offer different but interrelated ways of representing and constructing the significance of Italian culture and examining the cultural significance of place and time, as they take readers and viewers through historical dramas, social transformations, religious aspirations, political crises, and romantic atmospheres, all while presenting narratives of compelling personal and universal import. Taught in Italy by Dr. William Liddell and Prof. KellyAnn Liddell.

ENG 339: Topics: Warrior Poet in Japanese Literature (3 hours)
This course will focus on two parallel traditions-one associated with the warrior, the other with the poet in Japanese literature. We will briefly consider Heian period models, and then move to the 20th and 21st centuries. We will study a number of texts from each tradition before treating the central figure, Mishima Yukio, whose oeuvre represents the union of the warrior and poet aesthetics. Finally, we will consider trends in contemporary Japanese fiction as exemplified by authors such as Murakami Haruki. Taught in Japan by Dr. Sandra Hughes.

ENG 349: Topics: Berlin in Mind - Travel Writing & Blogging (3 hours)
The purpose of the course is to help students find their voices as writers through the medium of travel writing. Participants will examine and reflect on established travel writing focusing on Germany and Berlin and create a blog or journal documenting their travel experiences. Taught in Berlin by Dr. Sylvia Henneberg.

ENG 396: Mythology/RELS 399: Study Abroad: Greek Myth in Context (3 hours)
This is a cross-listed course. No stories contain greater richness and depth and none have been more influential than those we call "Greek myths." In this cross-listed course students learn important ancient Greek tales while visiting sites in which many of these myths are said to have taken place--Athens, Eleusis, Delos, Delphi, Argos, and Mycenae. Meanwhile, students learn to read these tales as represented in Greek art--on vases and in sculpture that we view. Taught in Greece by Dr. Richard King.

ENG 399: Topics: Ancient Greek Rhetoric - Argument and Persuasion in Classical Texts (3 hours)
In this course, we'll study rhetoric--or the systematic study of persuasion--in its Grecian birthplace. As we travel throughout Greece, we'll shadow ancient Greek rhetoricians like Aristotle, Isocrates, and Gorgias, and consider how rhetoric acts as a cultural commentary, as an ethics, as a history, and as a counterpart to political philosophy. We'll also pay particular attention to how ancient and modern Greek culture shapes and enriches rhetoric's long lineage, as well as how ancient Grecian rhetoric still influences the way we think, communicate, and ultimately relate to one another today. Taught in Greece by Dr. Jeff Rice.

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Fashion Merchandising

IDFM 426: Fashion Design Market Trends (3 hours)
This course provides a survey of trend forecasting for fashion and related industries. Through lectures, discussions, and experiential activities, students will become acquainted with the guiding frameworks that are employed to understand and predict fashion change and will examine the integral role that social, cultural, and contextual indicators play in the forecasting process. Equipped with this knowledge, students will put their learning to practice through the completion of assignments that will require the identification, analysis, and interpretation, of existing and emerging fashion trends. The site location (i.e., Italy) for this course provides a unique opportunity for experiential learning due to its recognition as a global fashion center and further, offers an environment in which students can become first-hand observers of the artistic, historical, and cultural influences that shape the development of fashion trends. Upon course completion, students will demonstrate a heightened awareness of the many factors that inspire design trends and influence fashion change. Taught in Italy by Dr. RayeCarol Cavender.

IDFM 432: Visual Merchandising and Promotion (3 hours)
This course provides students with knowledge of the strategic purpose of retail atmospherics and an understanding of how visual merchandising serves as an effective sales strategy through appeals to consumers' affiliations, emotions and intellects. The site location (i.e., Italy) for this course provides a unique opportunity for experiential learning due to its recognition as a global fashion center, and further, it offers an environment in which students can become first-hand observers of the retail atmospherics employed by Italy's small businesses and larger companies, representing a variety of product categories and market levels. Students will put their learning to practice through the completion of assignments geared toward critical analysis of the visual merchandising strategies (e.g., signage, packaging, store atmospherics, etc.) of business with operations in the local area. Upon course completion, students will demonstrate an ability to be critical observers of creative merchandising concepts, an essential skill for future marketers, designers, production planners, visual merchandisers, and managers within fashion and related industries. Taught in Italy by Dr. RayeCarol Cavender.

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Film Studies

FILM 399 Topics: Modern China through Film (3 hours)
An introduction to the cinemas of mainland China, Hong Kong, and Taiwan, with a focus on how social, political and cultural changes of modern and contemporary China find their expressions in films. Students learn basic skills for understanding and interpreting cinematic language and see beyond what is pleasing to the eye or entertaining: the sociopolitical circumstances under which Chinese films are made, their subtle ambiguities as well as overt messages, and their interpretations of history, the relationship between individual filmmakers' aesthetic styles and social concerns, among other things. Selected film topics include: the "golden days" of Chinese leftist cinema in the 1930s and 1940s; the imperative to create "socialist realist" art in China under Mao's leadership; the challenge to official ideology after the end of the Cultural Revolution; the attempts to capture the changing faces and new mysteries of China with a globalizing economy; contemporary Hong Kong and Taiwan films about urban life and cultural hybridity; and the representations of gender and China's cultural past in martial arts fantasies. Taught in China by Dr. Gao Qian.

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French

FREN 211: French Culture Abroad (3 hours)
Course designed to develop an appreciation for different aspects of France and its people and culture, for a student with one year of college French or equivalent. Students develop a deeper understanding of the history, values, identity, and social and political structures of France and its people. Special emphasis is placed on the city of Paris. Taught in French in Paris I by Prof. Eddy Cuisinier.

FREN 306: Experiencing French Abroad: Graphic Paris (3 hours)
The city of Paris has been visually represented in every art form for centuries: paintings, sculptures, photos, film, and graphic novels. This course will examine the visual representations of Paris in comics, or bande dessinee. From the highly respected Louvre series to literary adaptations and historical narratives, we will see how artists portray the city and the effect this has. Taught in French in Paris II by Prof. Sarah Landolt.

FREN 314: Introduction to French Literature (3 hours)
In this course, we cover excerpts of literature from the late Middle Ages through the 20th century that are focused on the city of Paris. These excerpts include passages from novels as well as poems and short stories. We investigate more contemporary writing as well. Students will compile all of their own writings about literature and their own perceptions of Paris into a working portfolio. Some authors of note for the course include Montaigne, Maupassant, Hugo, Zola, Balzac, Baudelaire, Apollinaire, and de Beauvoir. Taught in French in Paris II by Prof. Jeorg Ellen Sauer.

FREN 323: French Civilization & Culture (3 hours)
This course focuses on Paris as Text. By examining various cultural forms - artistic, historical, economic, gastronomic, etc. - students gain a better appreciation for Parisian society, past and present. The course combines readings, lectures, conferences, and (small) group excursions. All readings and discussion are in French, with the goal of proficiency in the language, and of understanding and expression of the ideas raised. Taught in French in Paris II by Prof. Sarah Landolt.

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Geography/Geology

GEOG 226: Dangerous Planet (3 hours)
Introduction to how normal Earth processes concentrate their energies to create devastating impacts to humans and the built environment, with an emphasis on the Earth's "Ring of Fire". This class investigates the causes of and risks involved along an active plate boundary in Ecuador, where the collision of the Pacific and South American plates result in numerous devastating earthquakes (such as the magnitude 7.8 earthquake that struck the nation on April 16, 2016) and volcanoes. We visit several active volcanoes, including Quilotoa, Cotopaxi, and the Galapagos islands (as an optional and additional one-week, one-credit hour class, GEOL 475.) Taught in Ecuador by Dr. John White.

GEOG 328: Elements of Biogeography (3 hours)
In this course, we examine interrelationships among climatic factors, vegetational biomes, and soil-forming processes, as well as human alteration of the biogeographical environment. Students a) identify and differentiate between the various different biomes within the Andes of Ecuador; b) articulate how the process of altitudinal zonation determines soil type, geomorphology, microclimate and fauna at various elevations throughout the Andes of Ecuador; c) extrapolate the climatologic, geomorphologic and biological divisions of the Andes to other ecosystems far removed from the site in which the course field studies are to be conducted; and d) identify and articulate major evolutionary and ecological patterns and processes that influence of the spatial and temporal distribution of organisms and communities. Taught in Ecuador by Prof. Ryan Kelly.

BIOL 475-1: Topics: Applied Field Experiences / GEOG 452: Applied Field Experiences (3 hours) Graduate credit available
This course introduces the student to the art and science of keeping scientific field notes. First we will explore the classic book "The Voyage of the Beagle" that was based on Darwin's field notes. Secondly, we will couple this with recent writings on field journal techniques. Using these readings as models, we will examine the diversity of ecosystems and landscapes of Ecuador as an historic explorer and modern naturalist. The diversity of fauna, flora and environments in Ecuador is ideal for serving as an excellent living laboratory to discuss field method and field data recording. Taught in Ecuador by Dr. Suzanne Strait and Dr. John White.

GEOL 475: Topics: Galapagos (1 credit hour)
As we visit the famous volcanic islands situated 600 miles off Ecuador's coast in the Pacific Ocean, we will study their geologic origin and history, and explore their role in the development of evolutionary thought. We visit several of their unique ecosystems including dry lowlands and the moister volcanic highlands, and snorkel in the rich surrounding waters. We talk with Galapagos residents to gain a fuller understanding of the history of human occupation of the islands and the challenges ahead for preserving this fascinating archipelago. This 1-credit-hour course is open only to students who select the optional Galapagos program extension. Taught in Ecuador by Dr. John White.

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German

GERM 102: Elementary German II (3 hours)
Extension of German I that moves toward increased linguistic and social awareness of German-speaking cultures. Students will use the past tense, demonstrate basic understanding of aspects of the German-speaking world, and be able to give information on course topics. Special emphasis is placed on having students interact with their cultural surroundings in Bregenz, Austria. Taught in German in Austria by Prof. Laurie LeCompte.

GERM 105: Introduction to German Culture (3 hours)
German 105 is a survey of the culture of German-speaking Europe with emphasis on values, behavioral characteristics, social, political, and physical structures, history, and achievements of German-speaking peoples. The course considers Austria to be its textbook; readings, lectures, and excursions will center on German culture as it expresses itself throughout the region. This class is taught in English and must be taken in conjunction with another class on the study abroad program. Taught in Austria by Prof. Jordan Gabbard.

GERM 306: Experiencing German Abroad: The Cultural History of Munich (3 hours)
We will begin with a history of the city, answering the question of why the city was founded when and where it was. Then we will go on to talk about the significance of the city as the seat of power in Bavaria through WWI. We will then cover the period during and between the two world wars and the role Munich played during those times. Our class will conclude with material related to the evolution of the city and its cultural offerings since WWII. And our classroom will be the city, its museums and its rich architectural heritage! As a culmination to the class, we will visit the Munchner Stadtmuseum (Munich City Museum) which traces the history of the city from its beginnings to the present. Taught in German in Munich by Prof. Nancy Jentsch.

GERM 333: Germanic Civilization and Culture: German Juvenile Literature (3 hours)
German history and culture come alive through the works of writers who have sought to instruct and encourage young people over the ages. This course will begin with an overview of the history of German juvenile literature, showing connections between the works and the times in which they were written. Historical texts will include not only the tales of the Grimm Brothers, but also the controversial Struwwelpeter, with its graphic innovations and its political allusions. The course will continue with more recent texts, many of which have a connection to Munich and surroundings, and which provide a unique look at cultural and social aspects of German life today. Taught in German in Munich by Prof. Nancy Jentsch.

GERM 455: Topics: Drama, Film and Popular Culture (3 hours)
This course, taught in German, will explore German culture through multiple outlets in the cultural scene of Munich. Reading dramas and subsequently viewing them on the Munich stage, attending screenings of the Munich Film Festival and exploring the world of art, television and music, students will gain an in-depth understanding of the development of contemporary German society and culture, while at the same time practicing and furthering their spoken and written German at an advanced level. Taught in German. Taught in German in Munich by Dr. Bess Contreras.

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Graduate Courses
A selection of study abroad courses (taught in English) are offered for graduate credit to students who have completed their undergraduate degree. For course descriptions, see corresponding undergraduate course in the specific subject area. If interested in additional Graduate course possibilities or offerings on KIIS programs, contact Maria Canning.

AGEC 475-1/ECON 410: Topics: International Agribusiness Economics (3 hours) Graduate credit available
Principles of economics applied to agricultural sector at international level. The course covers global market structures for agricultural inputs and products, a review of major importers and exporters in agribusiness sector. The course includes governmental agribusiness policies, international trade organizations, and treaties, with emphasis on agribusiness issues. The course includes examination of domestic and international policies that affect world prices of food products. To enhance the course content, we closely examine Chilean case studies, environments and resources. Taught in Chile by Dr. Dominique Gumirakiza .

AGEC 475-2: International Agribusiness Marketing (3 hours) Graduate credit available
Analysis of worldwide agricultural markets, marketing practices, functions, and strategies employed by agribusiness product and service firms. Market research, market segmentation and agrimarketing mix development are included in this course. Among the topics reviewed. Students develop an international agribusiness marketing plan. To enhance the course content, we closely examine Chilean case studies, environments and resources. Taught in Chile by Dr. Dominique Gumirakiza .

BIOL 475-1: Topics: Applied Field Experiences / GEOG 452: Applied Field Experiences (3 hours) Graduate credit available
This course introduces the student to the art and science of keeping scientific field notes. First we will explore the classic book "The Voyage of the Beagle" that was based on Darwin's field notes. Secondly, we will couple this with recent writings on field journal techniques. Using these readings as models, we will examine the diversity of ecosystems and landscapes of Ecuador as an historic explorer and modern naturalist. The diversity of fauna, flora and environments in Ecuador is ideal for serving as an excellent living laboratory to discuss field method and field data recording. Taught in Ecuador by Dr. Suzanne Strait and Dr. John White.

BIOL 475-2: Field Biology: Tropical Biodiversity and Conservation (3 hours) Graduate credit available
This course introduces the student to the extraordinary variety of plants, animals, and ecosystems of tropical regions. Students observe and study the wide range of habitats in the natural regions of Ecuador (a recognized center of mega diversity). Students will have the opportunity to gain in-depth understanding of the biodiversity and conservation issues confronting societies in tropical regions by readings and first-hand observations of the natural resources and the local communities. We will utilize the natural laboratory of Ecuador to explore diverse tropical ecosystems including Andean highlands, tropical intermontaine valleys and tropical rainforests. Emphasis is on understanding biodiversity issues in the tropics and on conservation strategies needed to protect these dwindling resources. Taught in Ecuador by Dr. Suzanne Strait.

BIOL 485: Field Biology: Galapagos (1 credit hour) Graduate credit available
As we visit the famous volcanic islands situated 600 miles off Ecuador's coast in the Pacific Ocean, we will study their geologic origin and history, and explore their role in the development of evolutionary thought. We will visit several of their unique ecosystems including dry lowlands and the moister volcanic highlands, and snorkel in the rich surrounding waters. We will talk with Galapagos residents to gain a fuller understanding of the history of human occupation of the islands and the challenges ahead for preserving this fascinating archipelago. This 1-credit-hour course is open only to students who select the optional Galapagos program extension. Taught in Ecuador by Dr. Suzanne Strait.

GEOG 226: Dangerous Planet (3 hours) Graduate credit available
Introduction to how normal Earth processes concentrate their energies to create devastating impacts to humans and the built environment, with an emphasis on the Earth's "Ring of Fire". This class investigates the causes of and risks involved along an active plate boundary in Ecuador, where the collision of the Pacific and South American plates result in numerous devastating earthquakes (such as the magnitude 7.8 earthquake that struck the nation on April 16, 2016) and volcanoes. We visit several active volcanoes, including Quilotoa, Cotopaxi, and the Galapagos islands (as an optional and additional one-week, one-credit hour class, GEOL 475.) Taught in Ecuador by Dr. John White.

GEOL 475: Topics: Galapagos (1 credit hour) Graduate credit available
As we visit the famous volcanic islands situated 600 miles off Ecuador's coast in the Pacific Ocean, we will study their geologic origin and history, and explore their role in the development of evolutionary thought. We visit several of their unique ecosystems including dry lowlands and the moister volcanic highlands, and snorkel in the rich surrounding waters. We talk with Galapagos residents to gain a fuller understanding of the history of human occupation of the islands and the challenges ahead for preserving this fascinating archipelago. This 1-credit-hour course is open only to students who select the optional Galapagos program extension. Taught in Ecuador by Dr. John White.

HCA 459/ 459G Global Health Service-Learning Practicum (3-6 hours) Graduate credit available
The Global Health Service-Learning (GHSL) practicum opens doors for both undergraduate and graduate students in health professions such as medicine, nursing, nutrition, social work, and health administration to apply their skills alongside their Tanzanian counterparts while serving the health needs of the community. Key populations targeted by the program include the youth, HIV/AIDS patients, orphans, and a university community. The GHSL practicum can also be taken as an internship for students in health-related majors. Taught in Tanzania by Dr. William Mkanta and Dr. Priya Dasgupta.

HIST 490-1 Topics: Battleground of Empires (3 hours) Graduate credit / Honors credit available
This course focuses mainly on the peoples, histories and cultures of Slavic Europe with special emphasis on the Soviet and German occupations. The class combines traditional class activities with excursions to relevant places of interest in Eastern Europe and the surrounding countryside. Students are asked to critically examine their encounters with Slavic society. Includes an opportunity to present a paper at an international student conference (must consult with the professor prior to departure). Taught in Slavic Europe by Dr. Adrian Mandzy.

HIST 490-2 Topics: War and Memory in Eastern Europe (3 hours) Graduate credit / Honors credit available
This course explores how societies in Eastern Europe memorialize twentieth century wars. A society's war memorials affect future military mobilization, define national and civic identity, and provide solace to the families of the fallen. This course will examine issues of war, death, and memorialization in Eastern Europe generally, and in Warsaw and Auschwitz in particular. We will survey transformations in various memorial sites over time, and engage with these sites and their legacies in person. The political transformations from the Austro-Hungarian Empire to the Soviet Union to current Eastern European states will be explored through the various layers of war memorials. Taught in Slavic Europe by Dr. Karen Petrone.

MGT 305: Ethics and Critical Thinking: Business Ethics (3 hours) Graduate credit available
This course presents an examination of the administrator's social, ethical, and environmental responsibilities to his employees, customers, and the general public and other external factors which management must be cognizant of in modern society. Ethical decision making in an organization, or for that matter any setting, does not occur in a vacuum. As individuals and as managers, we formulate our ethics (the standards of "right" and "wrong" behavior that we set for ourselves) based upon a number of converging concepts, ideals and variables. These include: family, peer, and religious influences, our past experiences, and our own unique value systems. When we make ethical decisions within the organizational context, many times there are situational factors and potential conflict of interest that further complicate the process. The case method is used in this course. Students get asked the sort of questions a senior executive might ask in a staff meeting. Such questions would typically require serious preparation, effective communication, and critical thinking. We will make regular use of Chilean excursions and resources to enhance our class discussions. Taught in Chile by Dr. Uyi Lawani.

MGT 316: International Management (3 hours) Graduate credit available
This course focuses on the challenges and opportunities associated with organizational management and business strategy in the global environment. Using Chile as context, students will gain a specific overview of the process and effect of internationalization in contemporary business. Students will be introduced to theories, concepts and skills relevant to managing effectively in today's global environment. The course challenges students to integrate knowledge they have gained from other business core courses and apply their accumulated knowledge to business case studies. Students will engage in research and analytical problem solving related to managing in the international environment and will frequently be called upon to brief their findings to the class. We will make regular use of Chilean excursions and resources to enhance our class discussions. Taught in Chile by Dr. Uyi Lawani.

PH 469/530 Topics: Occupational Health and Safety (3 hours) Graduate credit available
This course will address the design and conduct of intervention studies, with an emphasis on those that aim to reduce occupational and environmental risk factors for injury, illness or disability. Primary and secondary prevention will both be addressed. Intervention research may involve attempts to bring about change at either the individual level or within groups, organizations, or societies. Possible outcomes are similarly varied: change in exposure, health endpoint, employer compliance with legal requirements, cost of workers' compensation claims, etc. The choices of level and of outcome variable should be consistent with our prior beliefs about the nature of the problem and the mechanism by which it exists and could be fixed. The course will use a mix of lectures, directed readings, classroom exercises, and critical discussion (oral and written) of relevant studies. Selected scientific articles will be evaluated with respect to study design and methodologic issues. We will also consider how to evaluate scientific findings in terms of their implications for policy-setting. For the course project, each student will select an occupational or environmental health problem and identify and justify an appropriate intervention approach. Taught in Tanzania by Dr. Priya Dasgupta.

PS 366: Government and Politics in East Asia (3 hours) Graduate credit available
This course will examine international relations in East Asian countries, including China (and Taiwan), South and North Korea, and Japan. The main focus of this course will be on current security and economic issues in this region since World War II, although we will also briefly discuss the historical background necessary to understand current events. Taught in China by Dr. Darrin Wilson.

PS 460: Topics: Politics and Chinese Society (3 hours) Graduate credit available
China is one of the most complex, yet unified societies in the world. Their culture spans thousands of years and is considered one of the oldest. Their land is so vast and their people are so diverse that it contains multiple languages, different foods, and varying economies based on region. During this class, students will have the opportunity to immerse themselves into the Chinese society through an exploration of its people, culture, and government. Students will explore the major cities of China such as Beijing and Shanghai. Chinese experts and government officials will offer students a unique perspective of governance and society. Taught in China by Dr. Darrin Wilson.

PS 460 Topics: Military Rule and Human Rights in Chile (3 hours) Graduate credit available
This course examines the relationship between the armed forces and society, with a focus on the Pinochet Dictatorship (1973-90) and the subsequent struggle for human rights. Within this context, we investigate a number of questions. First, why do militaries overthrow civilian leaders when it is supposed to be their job to defend them? Second, what do militaries do when they are in power and how do their policies different from civilian leaders? Third, if military haves the guns, why do they ultimately leave power? Finally, what difficulties arise when civilians try to hold military leaders accountable for war crimes committed during their tenure, and how does this generally affect human rights discourse? Taught in Chile by Dr. Shawn Schulenberg.

SWRK 490-1/695-1: International Social Service & Community Service Learning (3 hours)   Graduate credit available
Responsible global citizenship through the perspective of inter-professional helping practices will be explored in this course. Community service projects will be developed that are interdisciplinary and provide opportunities for student engagement with nursing, public health and native Tanzanians. A survey of the cultural, social, political, and health history of the country of Tanzania will serve as a foundation for students to exchange information, apply basic social work principles, and practice skills. Students will engage in service learning opportunities while immerging into the culture of Tanzania. Taught in Tanzania by Dr. Saundra Starks.

SWRK 490-2/695-2: Cultural Influences in Spirituality and Healing Approaches (3 hours)   Graduate credit available
The role of spirituality and non-traditional healing will serve as a foundation in this course. Diversity in spiritual and religious practices for healing and sustenance will be examined by the use of several perspectives that include systems, expressive modalities, strengths, and feminist theories. Students will engage in discussions and opportunities to further explore implications for the use of non-traditional healing methods while emerging themselves into the culture of East Africa. Taught in Tanzania by Dr. Saundra Starks.

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Health Care Administration / Public Health

PH 469-1: Topics: Human Health and Wellness (3 hours)
An introduction to the concept of personal health and wellness and the relationship to a positive lifestyle. The seven dimensions of wellness are explored to promote a balanced 'wheel' and students are asked to develop a personal growth plan. A variety of topics concerning health and wellness are introduced, including, but not limited to, stress management, mental health and illness, sleep, physical fitness, nutrition, weight management, chronic diseases, substance use and abuse, violence, unintentional injury, sexually transmitted infections, healthy relationships, environmental health, and other relevant topics. Taught in Costa Rica by Dr. Melinda Ickes.

PH 469-2: Topics: Health and Society in a Global Context (3 hours)
This course examines how social, behavioral, environmental and political factors influence public health in community, national, and global contexts. The global distribution of disease and mortality, the underlying determinants of health disparities and inequalities, the international development and role of policies, and the complex impacts and outcomes of public health interventions will be explored. This course also introduces students to key concepts in health policy formation, implementation and evaluation in a global context. Students are asked to participate in a hands-on advocacy project throughout the course. Taught in Costa Rica by Dr. Melinda Ickes.

HCA 459/ 459G Global Health Service-Learning Practicum (3-6 hours) Graduate credit available
The Global Health Service-Learning (GHSL) practicum opens doors for both undergraduate and graduate students in health professions such as medicine, nursing, nutrition, social work, and health administration to apply their skills alongside their Tanzanian counterparts while serving the health needs of the community. Key populations targeted by the program include the youth, HIV/AIDS patients, orphans, and a university community. The GHSL practicum can also be taken as an internship for students in health-related majors. Taught in Tanzania by Dr. William Mkanta and Dr. Priya Dasgupta.

PH 469/530 Topics: Occupational Health and Safety (3 hours) Graduate credit available
This course will address the design and conduct of intervention studies, with an emphasis on those that aim to reduce occupational and environmental risk factors for injury, illness or disability. Primary and secondary prevention will both be addressed. Intervention research may involve attempts to bring about change at either the individual level or within groups, organizations, or societies. Possible outcomes are similarly varied: change in exposure, health endpoint, employer compliance with legal requirements, cost of workers' compensation claims, etc. The choices of level and of outcome variable should be consistent with our prior beliefs about the nature of the problem and the mechanism by which it exists and could be fixed. The course will use a mix of lectures, directed readings, classroom exercises, and critical discussion (oral and written) of relevant studies. Selected scientific articles will be evaluated with respect to study design and methodologic issues. We will also consider how to evaluate scientific findings in terms of their implications for policy-setting. For the course project, each student will select an occupational or environmental health problem and identify and justify an appropriate intervention approach. Taught in Tanzania by Dr. Priya Dasgupta.

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History

HIST 422: French Revolution (3 hours)
This course provides students with a detailed look at the French Revolution-its causes, goals, course, and outcomes-focusing in particular on events in Paris, the epicenter of the Revolution. The city serves as our classroom and together we visit such iconic sites as the Place de la Bastille, the Conciergerie, the Place de la Concorde, the Louvre and other places of revolutionary relevance. To grasp the Revolution's various causes, students begin by reading the Ancien Regime and the ways that government, politics, economy, and society functioned under the French monarchy. Then we examine the accomplishments, culture, and course of the Revolution as it grew progressively more radical, culminating in the Reign of Terror in 1794. Finally, we examine the later years of the Revolution under the Directory, ending our study with Napoleon's seizing of power in 1799. Taught in Paris I by Dr. Francois Le Roy.

HIST 490: Topics: The Collapse of Weimar and the Rise of Hitler (3 hours)
Students in this month-long course will study the collapse of the Weimar Republic, and the rise of Hitler and the Nazis, in Berlin itself, the city where much of the relevant history took place. The course addresses cultural, economic and political forces which can cause the constitutional order of an industrialized western democracy to collapse. This includes attention to flaws in the technical legal design of a constitution susceptible to exploitation by those intending to undermine the democratic order. Students personally visit sites in and around Berlin where critical events in German interwar history occurred. Taught in Berlin by Prof. Eric Alden.

HIST 491: Topics: The Cold War and the Fall of the Berlin Wall (3 hours)
Students in this month-long course will study the postwar military confrontation in Europe between NATO and the Soviet Union, up through the opening of the Berlin Wall on Nov. 9, 1989. The instructor in this course personally lived and studied in West Berlin from 1988 to 1991, and with his father was literally in the middle of Checkpoint Charlie at the moment it opened and the first East Germans started pouring through into the West, spending the rest of the night on top of the Wall at the Brandenburg Gate pulling East Germans up and over the top. Students visit sites in and around Berlin where the major historical events of this period took place, including Checkpoint Charlie, the Brandenburg Gate, the Cold War spy bridge (die Glienicker Brucke) and many others. The instructor will walk students through the events of the night of Nov. 9, 1989 from direct personal experience, in the actual locations where those events occurred. Taught in Berlin by Prof. Eric Alden.

HIST 490 Topics: Denmark - Viking Age to Modern State (3 hours)
Though in recent times a tiny nation, Denmark has often played a pivotal role in world affairs. This course will look at the broad sweep of Danish history, concentrating heavily on the country's notorious Viking past. In this exploration, students will savor the country's rich collection of Viking sites, including restored villages, reconstructed ships, and well-stocked museums. During the second half of the course, we will examine Denmark's transition to a medieval Christian kingdom and subsequently to a modern state. In the final sessions, the course will explore life in Denmark under Nazi occupation. Taught in Denmark by Dr. Carolyn Dupont.

HIST 490: Topics: Day to Day in Ancient Greece (3 hours)
What did the ancients wear? eat? hate? love? How did they spend their days and nights? How did they survive without the car, movies, texting? How did they make their money? What did they think about the good life, death, politics, sex? Why do we care? This course explores the ordinary lives of ancient Greeks- and of the Romans, Jews, and Christians who lived near them- as we wander their towns and poke our noses into what remains of their homes, temples, stores, streets. Taught in Greece by Dr. Chris Shea.

HIST 490: Topics: The History of Roman Greece (3 hours)
This course introduces students to the ways in which classical Greece was transformed by the Roman conquest of the Eastern Mediterranean. We examine literary, historical, and archaeological sources to address issues of social, political, religious, and economic change brought about by the imperialism of Rome. Careful consideration is paid to the absorption and modification of (subjugated) Greek cultural institutions and traditions by the (victorious) Romans to suit Roman tastes and needs. Taught in Greece by Prof. Kathleen Quinn.

HIST 490-1 Topics: Battleground of Empires (3 hours) Graduate credit / Honors credit available
This course focuses mainly on the peoples, histories and cultures of Slavic Europe with special emphasis on the Soviet and German occupations. The class combines traditional class activities with excursions to relevant places of interest in Eastern Europe and the surrounding countryside. Students are asked to critically examine their encounters with Slavic society. Includes an opportunity to present a paper at an international student conference (must consult with the professor prior to departure). Taught in Slavic Europe by Dr. Adrian Mandzy.

HIST 490-2 Topics: War and Memory in Eastern Europe (3 hours) Graduate credit / Honors credit available
This course explores how societies in Eastern Europe memorialize twentieth century wars. A society's war memorials affect future military mobilization, define national and civic identity, and provide solace to the families of the fallen. This course will examine issues of war, death, and memorialization in Eastern Europe generally, and in Warsaw and Auschwitz in particular. We will survey transformations in various memorial sites over time, and engage with these sites and their legacies in person. The political transformations from the Austro-Hungarian Empire to the Soviet Union to current Eastern European states will be explored through the various layers of war memorials. Taught in Slavic Europe by Dr. Karen Petrone.

HIST 491 Topics: World War II and the Holocaust in Eastern Europe(3 hours) Honors credit available
Eastern Europe was the fulcrum of the Second World War: the site of its most decisive conflict, the war between Nazi Germany and the Soviet Union; the primary area in which the killings of the Holocaust were implemented; and the scene of bitter struggles among Ukrainians, Poles, Russians and others that comprised a "war within the war". This course focuses on the relationship between war and genocide, concentrating on the experiences of war in the Slavic regions of Eastern Europe. Topics include the military history of the Nazi-Soviet War, home fronts, life under German occupation, genocide & ethnic cleansing, resistance & collaboration, and ethnic conflicts among Slavic Europeans and others. Taught in Slavic Europe by Dr. Kenneth Slepyan.

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Honors Courses
Any student with a 3.2 GPA or above can enroll in these courses for Honors credit. Students enrolled for Honors credit will have more challenging and unconventional assignments that will require greater analytical, creative, and critical thinking skills. If interested in an Honors Augmentation on KIIS programs, contact Maria Canning.

AFAM 480/HON 300: Topics: Black Paris (3 hours)
In this course, students study the history and experiences of the African diaspora in Paris from 1716 to the present. Students begin by familiarizing themselves with historical debates surrounding the condition of black slaves on French soil following the Edict of October 1716. Using Tracy Denean Sharpley-Witing's book entitled Black Venus: Sexual Savages, Primal Fears, and Primitive Narratives in French, students will further explore representations of black women in 19th century France as well as how projected French caricatures of black womanhood have been contested by various black female writers and artists. As part of the 20th century segment, students will examine the cultural and intellectual interactions among African-American, Afro-Caribbean and African artists, activists and writers in Paris. Brent Hayes book in particular, The Practice of Diaspora: literature Translation, and the rise of Black Internationalism, introduces students to the international alliances that African American writers formed in Paris as they sought refuge from racism in the United States. Other works such as Bernard Dadie's An African in Paris, Dominic Thomas' Black France: Colonialism, Immigration, and Transnational Culture as well as Alain Mabanckou's Black Bazar (among others) are used by students to analyze the politics of African immigration to France. Students are also encouraged to participate in a "Black Paris Tour" of the city where they will visit various locations that were made popular by African American writers, musicians and political exiles. Taught in Paris I by Dr. Mich Nyawalo.

POP 399/HON 300: Topics: French Hip-Hop and National Identity (3 hours)
This course explores contemporary debates surrounding French national identity, immigration and second-class citizenship through the prism of hip-hop music. The course begins by providing a general history surrounding the birth and development of the French Hip-Hop industry. Students subsequently examine the ways in which French hip-hop artists have engaged with issues such as the politics of the veil in French high schools, the rise of the National Front, the riots in the banlieue as well as the politics of immigration, among other topics. Students are encouraged to visit various cultural scenes in Paris where hip-hop culture proliferates. Taught in Paris I by Dr. Mich Nyawalo.

ENG 290/HON 300: Topics: Italy in Fiction and Film (3 hours)
This interdisciplinary and comparative course explores and analyses the role and representation of Italy, its places and its people, in novels and films, by native Italians as well as expatriate and foreign writers and directors. Fiction and film offer different but interrelated ways of representing and constructing the significance of Italian culture and examining the cultural significance of place and time, as they take readers and viewers through historical dramas, social transformations, religious aspirations, political crises, and romantic atmospheres, all while presenting narratives of compelling personal and universal import. Taught in Italy by Dr. William Liddell and Prof. KellyAnn Liddell.

HIST 490-1 Topics: Battleground of Empires (3 hours) Graduate credit / Honors credit available
This course focuses mainly on the peoples, histories and cultures of Slavic Europe with special emphasis on the Soviet and German occupations. The class combines traditional class activities with excursions to relevant places of interest in Eastern Europe and the surrounding countryside. Students are asked to critically examine their encounters with Slavic society. Includes an opportunity to present a paper at an international student conference (must consult with the professor prior to departure). Taught in Slavic Europe by Dr. Adrian Mandzy.

HIST 490-2 Topics: War and Memory in Eastern Europe (3 hours) Graduate credit / Honors credit available
This course explores how societies in Eastern Europe memorialize twentieth century wars. A society's war memorials affect future military mobilization, define national and civic identity, and provide solace to the families of the fallen. This course will examine issues of war, death, and memorialization in Eastern Europe generally, and in Warsaw and Auschwitz in particular. We will survey transformations in various memorial sites over time, and engage with these sites and their legacies in person. The political transformations from the Austro-Hungarian Empire to the Soviet Union to current Eastern European states will be explored through the various layers of war memorials. Taught in Slavic Europe by Dr. Karen Petrone.

HIST 491 Topics: World War II and the Holocaust in Eastern Europe(3 hours) Honors credit available
Eastern Europe was the fulcrum of the Second World War: the site of its most decisive conflict, the war between Nazi Germany and the Soviet Union; the primary area in which the killings of the Holocaust were implemented; and the scene of bitter struggles among Ukrainians, Poles, Russians and others that comprised a "war within the war". This course focuses on the relationship between war and genocide, concentrating on the experiences of war in the Slavic regions of Eastern Europe. Topics include the military history of the Nazi-Soviet War, home fronts, life under German occupation, genocide & ethnic cleansing, resistance & collaboration, and ethnic conflicts among Slavic Europeans and others. Taught in Slavic Europe by Dr. Kenneth Slepyan.

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Internships & Service-Learning
The Internship & Service-Learning courses below are open to undergraduate and graduate. Additional international internships may be available. Contact the KIIS office at 270-745-4416 or kiis@wku.edu.

HCA 459/ 459G Global Health Service-Learning Practicum (3-6 hours) Graduate credit available
The Global Health Service-Learning (GHSL) practicum opens doors for both undergraduate and graduate students in health professions such as medicine, nursing, nutrition, social work, and health administration to apply their skills alongside their Tanzanian counterparts while serving the health needs of the community. Key populations targeted by the program include the youth, HIV/AIDS patients, orphans, and a university community. The GHSL practicum can also be taken as an internship for students in health-related majors. Taught in Tanzania by Dr. William Mkanta and Dr. Priya Dasgupta.

Internship Opportunities are available for both undergraduate and graduate students in health professions such as medicine, nursing, nutrition, social work, and health administration. Interested students should contact KIIS Tanzania Program Director Dr. William Mkanta to begin making preparations for a Tanzania internship experience.

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Italian

ITAL 105: Introduction to Italian Culture (3 hours)
What is the "real" Italy? Is there a true representation of the Italian experience? How does it differ for different people in different places? This course focuses on Italian cultural experiences, exploring daily life in a variety of spaces, as well as interrogating some of the stereotypes about Italy and Italians. We will explore major aspects of contemporary Italian life: cafe culture, markets, social life, sports and fandom, car culture, celebrity, politics, cuisine, film/celebrity, and religion, among others. Taught in Italy by Dr. William Liddell and Prof. KellyAnn Liddell.

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Japanese

JAPN 115: Introduction to Japanese Culture (3 hours)
This course is a survey of contemporary Japanese character and society. A historical perspective, attitudes, achievements, institutions and lifestyles of the Japanese people are explored. Conducted in English. The purpose of this course is to develop a deep understanding of a specific cultural group, to liberate oneself from a limited perspective on life based on the knowledge of the other culture and to heighten awareness and sensitivity to cultural diversity in general. Taught in Japan by Dr. Sandra Hughes.

JAPN 210: Intermediate Japanese Conversation Abroad (3 hours)
Course designed to develop the vocabulary and communication skills of a student with one year of college Japanese or equivalent, with emphasis on contact with Japanese native speakers. Taught in Japanese in Japan by Dr. Zelideth Rivas.

JAPN 310: Advanced Japanese Conversation Abroad (3 hours)
To enhance the vocabulary and oral communication skills of the student with a background of two year of college Japanese or equivalent. The course involves intensive speaking and writing, and emphasis will be placed on bringing the student into contact with the Japanese people and various aspects of their culture. Taught in Japanese in Japan by Prof. Yoko Hatakeyama.

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Journalism

ART 496/JOUR 481: Topics: Documenting Change - Cuba in Transition (3 hours)
Investigate Havana with is amazing architecture, streets, squares, cars, landscape, people, museums, along with its culture of outdoor cafes, performances, and complex cultural and political history. Image and word come together in this course to document and represent a country in transition as the relationship between Cuba and the United States shifts. How do Cubans see their past, present, and future? Exploring the artistic output of Cubans over the last 60 years will provide insight to shifts in their relationship to social and political realities and a critical response to the local environment. Creating a website, blog, or portfolio of images that transcend a cursory snapshot, students will investigate the critical application of design and journalistic principles and place them into a historic context.
Team taught in Cuba by Dr. Eileen McKiernan-Gonzalez and Prof. Doreen Maloney.

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Latin American Studies

LAS 200: Introduction to Latin American Studies (3 hours)
This course is intended to provide an interdisciplinary introduction to the study of the culture and societies of Latin America. Students gain an understanding of the major processes that have shaped Latin America in the past and continue to affect the region today. Course themes include the pre-Columbian past, the legacy of Spanish and Portuguese rule, the period of Independence, economic and political development, urbanization, migration, relations with the United States, and contemporary Latin American cultural diversity. This course is a foundational course for students in Latin American Studies. Students registering for this interdisciplinary course may select either SPAN 200, GEOG 200, HIST 200, or PS 200. Taught in Costa Rica by Dr. Willie Costley.

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Legal Studies

PLS 400-1: Comparative European Legal Systems (3 hours)
This course compares and contrasts the legal systems and processes of Europe and the United States. The comparative nature of this course encourages students to consider the pros and cons of the different systems, particularly in relation to the administration of criminal justice. Due to the advantageous geographic location of Bregenz, Austria, this course includes site visits to legal and political institutions in international settings. Taught in Austria by Prof. Kelly Collinsworth.

PLS 400-2: Popular Culture and Law (3 hours)
This course examines depictions of law, lawyers and the legal system in popular culture to better understand public attitude toward the role of law and lawyers within society. We look at the accuracy of portrayals of the legal system in popular culture and the ways those portrayals affect popular views of the legal profession. We further examine differences in the reflection of the legal profession in popular culture in European countries and the United States. Taught in Austria by Prof. Kelly Collinsworth.

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Modern Languages (see Chinese, German, French, Japanese, Italian, Spanish)

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Music

MUS 120: Music Appreciation (3 hours)
A survey of music from early to modern times, focused through musical events in northern Europe. The course aims to widen the musical horizons of the general college student and to make them a more discriminating listener, hearing modern music in a new way. Music of all styles will be studied, but special focus will be given to famous composers like Bach, Brahms, and Buxtehude, who lived and worked within hours of Copenhagen. A good portion of class time will be spent at historic performance venues, cathedrals, and music festivals. Taught in Denmark by Dr. Jason Vest.

MUS 338/POP 399: Topics: European Popular Music (3 hours)
An examination of European popular music from the 1950's to the modern day. The course will orient the student to different styles of music in Europe, including pop, hip-hop, rap, rock, Maghreb, and other ethnically influenced genres. Students will also analyze the cultural issues and events that inspired popular artists to produce their music and the music that played a part in social changes. Particular attention will be given to the music of Europe's growing immigrant culture, especially the hip-hop and Sufi of Muslim youth. The course will include numerous excursions to concerts and events in the area. Taught in Denmark by Dr. Jason Vest.

MUS 200 Music Theory III (3 hours)
The course addresses: modulation; chromatic harmony and harmonic practice of the 19th century into the 20th century; introduction to non-tonal practice, serialism, extended tertian harmonies; analytical methods, and requisite aural skills. Emphasis is placed on dictation and analysis, and techniques for contextual analysis of challenging passages taken from the repertoire. Taught in Salzburg by Dr. Matthew Herman.

MUS 201 Music Theory IV (3 Hours)
Continuation of melodic and harmonic dictation, rhythmic reading, and sight singing, composition of a sonatina in eighteenth century style for piano, enharmonic modulation, extended and altered dominant chords, late nineteenth century techniques, techniques of the twentieth century, post-tonal techniques. Taught in Salzburg by Dr. Michael Baker.

MUS 327 History II (3 hours)
This course focuses on the major composers and important performance trends from the Classical period through the present day The student cultivates an awareness of the social, historical and philosophical ideas that influences those musical styles, and studies the repertoire of these periods through readings, lectures, discussions, analysis and score study. Taught in Salzburg by Prof Scot Buzza.

MUS 338-1: Directed Study: Death in Music (3 hours) Graduate credit available
This course focuses on musical literature surveying artistic depictions of death through musical compositions. Both vocal/choral and instrumental music from medieval through contemporary music will be discussed and analyzed to identify the musical attributes used to define various aspects of death. Compositions with opposing connotations will be compared and contrasted. Taught in Salzburg by Dr. Jennifer Adam.

MUS 338-2: Directed Study: Instrumental & Choral Conducting (3 hours) Graduate credit available
Instrumental and Choral conducting develops the conducting technique of the musician through analysis and score study, individual and group exercises, study of conduction drills, individual works and excerpts, individual "podium" time for conducting and rehearsing, and self-evaluation of videotaped exercises. The student works toward the refinement of controlled 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 patterns and their subdivisions, the polishing of basic techniques including preparations, cut-offs, cues, fermate, dynamics, articulations, changes of tempo, irregular meters and expressive gesture. Emphasis is placed on the continued development of left hand techniques for dynamics, cues and phrases. In addition, the student fosters the development of score study and preparation skills, ear training and evaluation skills and the development of rehearsal technique and organization. Taught in Salzburg by Dr. Jennifer Adam.

MUS 338-3: Directed Study: Form & Analysis (3 hours)
Form and Analysis develops aural and written skills for analyzing how structural functions delineate musical form. The courses introduce structural functions in the context of short examples and apply these to understanding classical forms: binary, ternary, sonata, rondo, variation, imitative forms and their application in 19th and 20th century music. Emphasis is placed on contextual listening and connecting intuitive perceptions with an analytical framework that develops the student's ability to hear and write effectively about musical structure. Taught in Salzburg by Dr. Michael Baker.

MUS 338-4: Directed Study: Twilight in Vienna (3 Hours) Graduate credit available
Around the turn of the 20th century, pivotal geopolitical events were taking place in Europe that would eventually lead to the end of the Austro-Hungarian Empire. At the same time, German and Austrian composers were stretching and breaking the conventional rules of music, which led to the erosion of the tonal system and the eventual abandonment of tonality itself. Students will examine the history and music of this era in equal measure, with opportunities to visit locations important to both of these topics in and around Vienna. Taught in Salzburg by Dr. Matthew Herman.

MUS 414 Choral Materials (3 hours)
A practical survey for the school and church musician of choral music from the fifteenth- through the twentieth-centuries. Course emphasis will be on the evolution of secular and sacred choral forms and performance practices, which would be accessible for most choral programs. Taught in Salzburg by Prof Scot Buzza.

MUS 430 Music Literature: Mozart's Operas (3 hours) Graduate credit available
Musical and historical analysis of Mozart's operas in the locations where they were composed and premiered. Students will explore the development of Mozart's operas from his early years in Salzburg to his late years in Vienna. Through score study, readings, videos, and excursions in Salzburg and Vienna, students will examine Mozart's works in the context of his life, and the culture of the place in which he was born and worked. Students will have opportunities to attend live performances of numerous Mozart operas both within Salzburg, at the historical Landestheater and the Mozarteum, as well as on trips to nearby Vienna, Munich, and Linz. Taught in Salzburg by performer / pedagogue Dr. Yvonne Douthat Hartinger of the Mozarteum Carl Orff Institut.

* KIIS Salzburg Choral Ensemble (no credit)
Singers and instrumentalists will have the opportunity for public performances of choral repertoire in order to supplement material covered in the Conducting class, as well as in Orchestral and Choral Literature. In this extra-curricular ensemble appropriate works are chosen, studied, rehearsed and performed in several Austrian concert venues. Taught in Salzburg by multiple faculty members.

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Philosophy

PHIL 496: Seminar: National Identity, Immigration, and Contemporary Germany (3 hours)
In 2015, Chancellor Angela Merkel opened the borders of Germany to allow unrestricted immigration from Africa, Asia, the Balkans, and the Middle East. Current estimates are that 800,000 to one million refugees entered Germany in 2015 alone. An event of this magnitude raises complex questions regarding national and cultural identity, especially in light of Germany's troubled past. It also raises ethical, political, and philosophical questions, such as the responsibility of wealthy nations to refugees, and the tension between pluralism and assimilation in a liberal democracy, which are questions our own country is facing. This course examines the issues through readings, discussion, and on-site visits to neighborhoods and institutions in Berlin that seek to address these questions. Taught in Berlin by Dr. Nicholas Meriwether.

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Photography

ART 496: Topics: Digital Photography (3 hours)
Students will visit places of interest in the city and countryside. They will learn how to use their digital SLR camera and imaging software, preferably Adobe Photoshop, to enhance their photographic images and videos. Students enrolled in this course need to bring a laptop equipped with imaging software (details will be provided at the April KIIS Student Orientation). Taught in Italy by Prof. Randy Simmons.

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Political Science

PS 366: Government and Politics in East Asia (3 hours) Graduate credit available
This course will examine international relations in East Asian countries, including China (and Taiwan), South and North Korea, and Japan. The main focus of this course will be on current security and economic issues in this region since World War II, although we will also briefly discuss the historical background necessary to understand current events. Taught in China by Dr. Darrin Wilson.

PS 460: Topics: Politics and Chinese Society (3 hours) Graduate credit available
China is one of the most complex, yet unified societies in the world. Their culture spans thousands of years and is considered one of the oldest. Their land is so vast and their people are so diverse that it contains multiple languages, different foods, and varying economies based on region. During this class, students will have the opportunity to immerse themselves into the Chinese society through an exploration of its people, culture, and government. Students will explore the major cities of China such as Beijing and Shanghai. Chinese experts and government officials will offer students a unique perspective of governance and society. Taught in China by Dr. Darrin Wilson.

PS 460 Topics: Military Rule and Human Rights in Chile (3 hours) Graduate credit available
This course examines the relationship between the armed forces and society, with a focus on the Pinochet Dictatorship (1973-90) and the subsequent struggle for human rights. Within this context, we investigate a number of questions. First, why do militaries overthrow civilian leaders when it is supposed to be their job to defend them? Second, what do militaries do when they are in power and how do their policies different from civilian leaders? Third, if military haves the guns, why do they ultimately leave power? Finally, what difficulties arise when civilians try to hold military leaders accountable for war crimes committed during their tenure, and how does this generally affect human rights discourse? Taught in Chile by Dr. Shawn Schulenberg.

PS 460-1: Topics: Ethnicity, Nationalism and Politics in Spain (3 hours)
This course uses Barcelona and Spain as a case study of ethnicity and nationalism. Barcelona, the capital of Catalonia, is known for its separatist movement. Students start the course by looking at the sources of nationalism in Spain. We then turn to understanding the perpetuation of the nationalistic beliefs through culture and sports, examine normative issues with a visit to the Catalonia parliament and government buildings, and finish by considering separation as a solution for a nation. Taught in Barcelona by Dr. Drew Seib.

PS 460-2: Topics: Politics of Contemporary Europe (3 hours)
This course examines politics and policy in Europe, using Spain as the backdrop. The course begins with an examination of the institutions at play in Europe, at the international, national, and regional levels. The course then turns to examining the development of political parties and modern political identities in Europe. Next, the course examine several major issues at play in Europe, including issues dealing with immigration, religion, culture, and economics with visits to places such as El Raval and La Plaza Monumental, a former bullfighting ring. Taught in Barcelona by Dr. Drew Seib.

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Polpular Culture

MUS 338/POP 399: Topics: European Popular Music (3 hours)
An examination of European popular music from the 1950's to the modern day. The course will orient the student to different styles of music in Europe, including pop, hip-hop, rap, rock, Maghreb, and other ethnically influenced genres. Students will also analyze the cultural issues and events that inspired popular artists to produce their music and the music that played a part in social changes. Particular attention will be given to the music of Europe's growing immigrant culture, especially the hip-hop and Sufi of Muslim youth. The course will include numerous excursions to concerts and events in the area. Taught in Denmark by Dr. Jason Vest.

POP 399/HON 300: Topics: French Hip-Hop and National Identity (3 hours)
This course explores contemporary debates surrounding French national identity, immigration and second-class citizenship through the prism of hip-hop music. The course begins by providing a general history surrounding the birth and development of the French Hip-Hop industry. Students subsequently examine the ways in which French hip-hop artists have engaged with issues such as the politics of the veil in French high schools, the rise of the National Front, the riots in the banlieue as well as the politics of immigration, among other topics. Students are encouraged to visit various cultural scenes in Paris where hip-hop culture proliferates. Taught in Paris I by Dr. Mich Nyawalo.

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Psychology

PSY 199: Introduction to Developmental Psychology (3 hours)
This course introduces students to human development theory and application throughout the lifespan. We will have a particularly strong cultural foundation for this study of development. In the historic core of the World Heritage city of Segovia, Spain, we will be uniquely situated to observe and interact with residents of all ages, especially during residents' nightly evening walks. We will combine observations and experiences with readings from a little reader and from Spain-specific journal readings for each stage in the lifespan. Class will include all of the basic knowledge required for a lifespan development class with added unforgettable cultural perspectives. Taught in Spain May by Dr. MyraBeth Bundy.

PSY 299-1: Psychology of Art (3 hours)
This course is a slightly revised version of the course I taught in 2015. The revisions are based on my previous KIIS experience and the feedback I received from my students. The course explores selected topics in the psychology of art within the context of mid-19th to mid-20th century French painting. Psychopathology and art will be examined primarily through the study of Van Gogh and Maurice Utrillo. Creativity and the artistic personality will be examined primarily through the work of Picasso, Toulouse-Lautrec, Valadon, and Modigliani. Additional topics include how the brain processes and interprets art, art of the mentally ill, and the role of art in psychotherapy. Taught in Paris I by Dr. Robert Brubaker.

PSY 299-2: Nonverbal Behavior (3 hours)
Students learn to look at humans in terms of what they do, rather than what they say, and become aware of distinctively human characteristics such as artifact creation, art, and architecture. Students are introduced to the variety of technological and artifactual creations by humans through visits to museums in Paris, including the Musee Cluny and Musee du quai Branly. Our primate heritage will also be discussed following a visit to the Zoo de Vincennes. Attention is drawn to the varieties of human experience through, for example, observations and explorations of people at cafes and parks, interactions between people and their pets, and examination of grave stones and grave goods left at Paris cemeteries. Students will observe interpersonal behaviors at the Jardin du Luxembourg, in the Metro, and at marketplaces, and study architecture as communication at various sites including La Defense, Sainte Chapelle, and the Pere-Lachaise Cemetery. Students will compare their own behavior with that of Parisian people and other American students. Taught in Paris I by Dr. Robert Brubaker.

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Public Health

PH 469-1: Topics: Human Health and Wellness (3 hours)
An introduction to the concept of personal health and wellness and the relationship to a positive lifestyle. The seven dimensions of wellness are explored to promote a balanced 'wheel' and students are asked to develop a personal growth plan. A variety of topics concerning health and wellness are introduced, including, but not limited to, stress management, mental health and illness, sleep, physical fitness, nutrition, weight management, chronic diseases, substance use and abuse, violence, unintentional injury, sexually transmitted infections, healthy relationships, environmental health, and other relevant topics. Taught in Costa Rica by Dr. Melinda Ickes.

PH 469-2: Topics: Health and Society in a Global Context (3 hours)
This course examines how social, behavioral, environmental and political factors influence public health in community, national, and global contexts. The global distribution of disease and mortality, the underlying determinants of health disparities and inequalities, the international development and role of policies, and the complex impacts and outcomes of public health interventions will be explored. This course also introduces students to key concepts in health policy formation, implementation and evaluation in a global context. Students are asked to participate in a hands-on advocacy project throughout the course. Taught in Costa Rica by Dr. Melinda Ickes.

HCA 459/ 459G Global Health Service-Learning Practicum (3-6 hours) Graduate credit available
The Global Health Service-Learning (GHSL) practicum opens doors for both undergraduate and graduate students in health professions such as medicine, nursing, nutrition, social work, and health administration to apply their skills alongside their Tanzanian counterparts while serving the health needs of the community. Key populations targeted by the program include the youth, HIV/AIDS patients, orphans, and a university community. The GHSL practicum can also be taken as an internship for students in health-related majors. Taught in Tanzania by Dr. William Mkanta and Dr. Priya Dasgupta.

PH 469/530 Topics: Occupational Health and Safety (3 hours) Graduate credit available
This course will address the design and conduct of intervention studies, with an emphasis on those that aim to reduce occupational and environmental risk factors for injury, illness or disability. Primary and secondary prevention will both be addressed. Intervention research may involve attempts to bring about change at either the individual level or within groups, organizations, or societies. Possible outcomes are similarly varied: change in exposure, health endpoint, employer compliance with legal requirements, cost of workers' compensation claims, etc. The choices of level and of outcome variable should be consistent with our prior beliefs about the nature of the problem and the mechanism by which it exists and could be fixed. The course will use a mix of lectures, directed readings, classroom exercises, and critical discussion (oral and written) of relevant studies. Selected scientific articles will be evaluated with respect to study design and methodologic issues. We will also consider how to evaluate scientific findings in terms of their implications for policy-setting. For the course project, each student will select an occupational or environmental health problem and identify and justify an appropriate intervention approach. Taught in Tanzania by Dr. Priya Dasgupta.

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Religious Studies

RELS 399: Topics: Martin Luther and the German Reformation (3 hours)
In 1517, in the small city of Wittenberg not far from Berlin, theology professor Martin Luther nailed 95 theses protesting certain church practices to the chapel door of All Saint's Church, launching a movement that would change Europe forever. 500 years later, in 2017, Germany will commemorate the anniversary of the Protestant Reformation. In addition to visiting key historical sites in Wittenberg and the surrounding region, this course explores the complex theological, political, and social factors that led to this momentous event, the effects of which continue to reverberate throughout Germany, Europe, and the world. Taught in Berlin by Dr. Nicholas Meriwether.

ENG 396: Mythology/RELS 399: Study Abroad: Greek Myth in Context (3 hours)
This is a cross-listed course. No stories contain greater richness and depth and none have been more influential than those we call "Greek myths." In this cross-listed course students learn important ancient Greek tales while visiting sites in which many of these myths are said to have taken place--Athens, Eleusis, Delos, Delphi, Argos, and Mycenae. Meanwhile, students learn to read these tales as represented in Greek art--on vases and in sculpture that we view. Taught in Greece by Dr. Richard King.

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Social Work

SWRK 490-1/695-1: International Social Service & Community Service Learning (3 hours)   Graduate credit available
Responsible global citizenship through the perspective of inter-professional helping practices will be explored in this course. Community service projects will be developed that are interdisciplinary and provide opportunities for student engagement with nursing, public health and native Tanzanians. A survey of the cultural, social, political, and health history of the country of Tanzania will serve as a foundation for students to exchange information, apply basic social work principles, and practice skills. Students will engage in service learning opportunities while immerging into the culture of Tanzania. Taught in Tanzania by Dr. Saundra Starks.

SWRK 490-2/695-2: Cultural Influences in Spirituality and Healing Approaches (3 hours)   Graduate credit available
The role of spirituality and non-traditional healing will serve as a foundation in this course. Diversity in spiritual and religious practices for healing and sustenance will be examined by the use of several perspectives that include systems, expressive modalities, strengths, and feminist theories. Students will engage in discussions and opportunities to further explore implications for the use of non-traditional healing methods while emerging themselves into the culture of East Africa. Taught in Tanzania by Dr. Saundra Starks.

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Sociology

SOCL 322: Religion in Society (3 hours)
We will explore the breadth and depth of early Pagan beliefs as well as the growth of the Church in the state of Yucatan and it's value to the people. This will include visiting religious spaces and places as well as visiting with local religious authorities. Taught in Mexico by Dr. Rebecca Katz.

SOCL 489/CRIM 489: Study Abroad: Gender and Crime in Latin America (3 hours)
This course will examine the intersection of gender roles and criminal behavior and victimization throughout the nation-state of Mexico. This will include a discussion of the drug cartels as well as corruption within the criminal justice system. The course also will examine the history of the crimes against the indigenous peoples of Mexico by the colonial powers. Taught in Mexico by Dr. Rebecca Katz.

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Spanish

SPAN 102: Elementary Spanish II (3 hours)
Conversational Spanish in the Costa Rican cultural context. Practice in basic language skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Emphasis is placed on the development of communicative proficiency. Students will complete brief interviews and written homework, group projects, and class discussions in basic Spanish. By the end of this class students should speak more fluidly, have a stronger vocabulary, and should be able to better comprehend Spanish conversation. In addition to the improvement in language skills, students will have a better understanding of the social and political situation in Costa Rica and the region. Taught in Spanish in Costa Rica by Dr. Genny Ballard.

SPAN 105: Introduction to Hispanic Culture (3 hours)
This course, taught in English, is designed to provide students with a critical understanding of Spanish history and culture, and foster an appreciation for contemporary Spain's issues and idiosyncrasies. The course will focus on contemporary Spain: its nationalisms, economy, society and popular culture. Our approach will be based on authentic texts sites we will visit places to support some of our findings in class, and we will expand from the textbook through other forms of media (art, excursions, etc.), group presentations and class discussion. Taught in Spain May by Prof. Ninfa Floyd.

SPAN 200: Introduction to Latin American Studies (3 hours)
This course is intended to provide an interdisciplinary introduction to the study of the culture and societies of Latin America. Students gain an understanding of the major processes that have shaped Latin America in the past and continue to affect the region today. Course themes include the pre-Columbian past, the legacy of Spanish and Portuguese rule, the period of Independence, economic and political development, urbanization, migration, relations with the United States, and contemporary Latin American cultural diversity. This course is a foundational course for students in Latin American Studies. Students registering for this interdisciplinary course may select either LAS 200, GEOG 200, HIST 200, or PS 200. Taught in Costa Rica by Dr. Willie Costley.

SPAN 201: Intermediate Spanish I (3 hours)
Through the coursework, experience abroad, and cultural encounters, this course will cultivate communicative skills and cultural awareness to prepare our students to be more knowledgeable and sensitive citizens of the global community. This course will further develop the speaking, writing, reading and listening comprehension of the students benefiting from the immersion aspect of a study abroad. Students will review Spanish grammar, and practice written and oral expression in a task-based instruction model. Students will read a variety of texts in Spanish, many of which will be chosen to supplement what the students will be experiencing in Merida. This will promote the application of critical reading skills and will provide the basis for discussion of the cultural traditions of the country and the contributions made by them. Taught in Spanish in Mexico by Dr. Miguel Rincon.

SPAN 202: Intermediate Spanish II (3 hours)
Through the coursework, experience abroad, and cultural encounters, this course will cultivate communicative skills and cultural awareness to prepare our students to be more knowledgeable and sensitive citizens of the global community. This course will further develop the speaking, writing, reading and listening comprehension of the students benefiting from the immersion aspect of a study abroad. Students will review Spanish grammar, and practice written and oral expression in a task-based instruction model. Students will read a variety of texts in Spanish, many of which will be chosen to supplement what the students will be experiencing in Merida. This will promote the application of critical reading skills and will provide the basis for discussion of the cultural traditions of the country and the contributions made by them. Taught in Spanish in Mexico by Dr. Miguel Rincon.

SPAN 306-1: Experiencing Spanish Abroad: Spanish Pronunciation (3 hours)
A course designed to develop language learners' abilities relating to the theory and practice of phonetics and pronunciation. Examination of phonetic system, variation, specific difficulties and inter-language/linguistic comparison. Taught in Spanish in Spain I by Dr. Lisa Kuriscak.

SPAN 306-2: Experiencing Spanish Abroad: Spanish Cinema (3 hours)
This course introduces students to cinema studies and how this medium is used to depict social issues including AIDS, domestic violence, Down syndrome, unemployment, and immigration. Through the analysis of film techniques, students will improve upon their written and oral skills, as well as expand their critical thinking skills about film. They will also gain enhanced knowledge of these cultural concerns both within Spain and beyond. Taught in Spanish in Spain I by Dr. Kajsa Larson.

SPAN 370: Spanish Conversation (3 hours)
This conversation class, for students with at least two years of college-level Spanish or the equivalent is designed to develop greater fluency, vocabulary knowledge, and refine grammatical proficiency to master more complex communication skills (including narrating and describing with a variety of verb tenses, providing detailed explanations, expressing and supporting opinions). The course also helps students increase their awareness about different cultural characteristics of the Spanish-speaking world. Taught in Spanish in Spain I by Dr. Lisa Kuriscak and Dr. Kajsa Larson.

SPAN 374: Literature and Culture of Spain (3 hours)
This course will introduce students to significant works of narrative, drama, and poetry by Spanish authors from the Middle Ages to the present. Students will apply the appropriate vocabulary and concepts to analyze the literary texts within the historical and cultural contexts in which they were produced. In addition, students will further develop their oral and written Spanish, as well as their skills in reading and critical thinking. Taught in Spanish in Spain I by Dr. Nelson Lopez.

SPAN 372 Latin American Civilization and Culture (3 hours)
This course is a survey of the historical and cultural background of Latin America and its people from the Discovery to the present. However this class will center in the indigenous influence in Latin American countries, particularly the Mayan cultural heritage in south of Mexico and Central America. Taught in Spanish in Mexico by Dr. Itzà Zavala-Garrett.

SPAN 373: Spanish Civilization and Culture (3 hours)
Survey of historical and cultural background of Spain and its people from the Roman colonization to the present. The topics are organized around a series of themes including religion, history, politics, regionalism, demography, art and architecture. The course addresses the complex historical, political and cultural identities of Spain in order to understand the country in the twenty-first century. Taught in Spanish in Spain II by Dr. Melissa Stewart.

SPAN 455 Topics: Independent Explorations in Education, Health and the Environment (3 hours)
KIIS Costa Rica offers independent studies in ESL, Education, and Public Health. Through this form of experiential learning, students integrate knowledge and theory with practical application in a professional setting abroad. This independent study course is a partnership guided by the student, a faculty mentor, and an on-site supervisor in Costa Rica. In Costa Rica, students can choose between independent studies in local elementary schools, teaching ESL to college-aged students, public health internships, sustainability and environmental studies, or agricultural internships related to coffee or sugar production as well as monitoring human impact on plants and animals. Reflection and reciprocity are essential components in community-based learning. This course incorporates both oral and written reflection. Students will share reflections both with the professor as well as in group discussions. They will have the opportunity to share their collective and unique experiences, as well as challenges, and concerns. In online journals, students will respond to carefully framed questions that allow for a critical examination of their experiences. All independent study students will submit a written culminating report and give a public presentation to the KIIS Costa Rica group and community members about their overall experience. This course requires proficiency in Spanish. Taught in Costa Rica by Dr. Genny Ballard.

SPAN 455-1: Topics: Trauma of the Spanish Civil War: Representations in Narrative (3 hours)
In this course students will study the Spanish Civil War through some films and novels that represent the most significant historical occurrence of contemporary Spain. The Spanish Civil War was not only the threshold of the fascist dictatorship in Spain, but also an international battlefield that served Hitler as an experiment for the Second World War. The course will focus on the representation of this historical event, the first international fight against fascism, through novels written in the present. Special attention will be given to the transformation of cultural and political frameworks that accompanied the transition to democracy in 1975, the effect of historical trauma for younger generations, and the heated debates generated around the movement to recover historical memory during the first decade of the 21st century. Taught in Spanish in Spain II by Dr. Carmen Moreno-Nuno.

SPAN 455-2: Topics: Phonetics (3 hours)
Pronunciation is one of the first features noticed by the native speakers in the speech of non-native speakers. In this class, students will study the sound patterns of Spanish and work on improving their own pronunciation. Through analysis, imitation, and practice, students will be able to identify major differences and similarities between the sound systems of North American English and Spanish. An important component of the course is speech analysis exercises in which students will go out into the community and transcribe and analyze short speech recordings of their host family and local community members. Students will also make and analyze pre- and post-term recordings of their own speech. Finally, as students interact with the local community, they will learn salient pronunciation features characteristic of the Peninsular Spanish as compared to other varieties of Spanish in Latin America. Taught in Spanish in Spain II by Dr. Chin-Sook Pak.

SPAN 470: Advanced Spanish (3 hours)
The main purpose of this course is to develop greater fluency, lexical expansion, grammatical accuracy, and better pronunciation of Spanish by reading authentic texts, exploring the local community, interviewing host family members, and sharing both written and oral reports of these experiences with the class. Emphasis will be placed on vocabulary building, polishing of grammar while working to master more complex oral communication tasks (such as narrating and describing using aspects of time, giving elaborate explanation, and stating and supporting opinions concretely), and achieving more target-like pronunciation. Taught in Spanish in Spain II by Dr. Chin-Sook Pak and Dr. Moises Rodriguez Castillo.

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KIIS--Western Kentucky University / 1906 College Heights Blvd #11030 / Bowling Green, KY 42101-1030 / Tel. 270-745-4416 / Fax. 270-745-4413 / kiis@wku.edu / www.kiis.org
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