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 Courses are taught in English, unless noted.
 Courses are 3 credit hours each, unless noted.

Anthropology/Archeology
ANTH 366-1 Topics: Archaeological Methods (3 hours)
This course introduces students to the concepts, goals, methods, and theories of the discipline of archaeology, with a focus on archaeological thinking skills. In addition to in-class (and out of class) data-based writing exercises, students will read The Life and Death of a Druid Prince, which analyses Lindow Man, a Celtic bog body from England. Students will also read Stealing History: Tomb Raiders, Smugglers, and the Looting of the Ancient World. This course will serve as a complement to the course on Viking Archaeology. Taught in Denmark by Dr. Kelli Carmean.

ANTH 366-2 Topics: Viking Archaeology (3 hours)
This course studies the Viking past through both archaeology and the sagas. Lectures will trace Viking development beginning with their expansion (as defined by the attack on Lindisfarne in 793), through the rise of early Christianity, until about 1100. The Far Traveler: Voyages of a Viking Woman as well as The Historical Atlas of the Vikings will be our textbooks. Visits to archaeological sites and museums, and subsequent writing responses by students, will form an important part of this course. Taught in Denmark by Dr. Kelli Carmean.

ANTH 366 Topics: Art and Archaeology of Ancient Greece (3 hours)
A survey of the major artifacts, monuments, and sites of the ancient Greek world, from the Bronze Age through the Hellenistic period, including influences on their development and study of cultural practices associated with them. Also includes discussion of the history, terminology, and methods of classical archaeology in Greece today. Taught in Greece by Prof. Kathleen Quinn.

ANTH 366 Topics: Physical Anthropology of East Africa (3 hours)
Physical anthropology is the study of human biology within an evolutionary framework, which means understanding both humans and non-human primates. In this class we will focus on human evolution in East Africa. Specifically, starting from the radiation of apes in the East African Miocene and then following the evolution of the Australopiths and eventually Homo. Included will be a trip to Olduvai Gorge one of the most important paleoanthropology sites in the world. Secondly, will we survey the ecology and behavior of the 24 species of primates indigenous to Tanzania. Tanzania is home to 27 species of primates (including many galagos, monkeys, and the common chimpanzee)-a third of which are found nowhere else on Earth. We will learn about the diversity of primates within an evolutionary framework and also have the unique opportunity to observe monkeys in their natural habitats. Taught in Tanzania by Dr. Suzanne Strait.

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Art/Art History
ART 140 Drawing I: Through Direct Observation (3 hours)
Using numerous locations throughout the city of Barcelona, this class will take on fundamental concerns of drawing through a free-hand and directly observed approach; such concerns include material control, volumetric form, light and shade, spatial depth, gesture, and negative and positive space. By approaching drawing as engagement with an observed place, this course aims to guide students not only towards a stronger understanding of the goals of fundamental drawing, but also of experiencing travel as an observer and not as a tourist or consumer. Taught in Barcelona by Prof. Kevin Gardner.

ART 340 Drawing III: Portraying Barcelona (3 hours)
This advanced level drawing course postulates that cities, like people, have individual characteristics, and that a place is best understood in relationship to the people who occupy it. Cities are designed for people and this course will undertake the drawing and painting of both through a variety of media, both graphic and aqueous. Similar to a travel journal, each student will keep an artist's book that will be the final product of this course, developed through numerous observational drawings and paintings, as well as reflections on readings and experiences, to form a personal portrait of Barcelona. Taught in Barcelona by Prof. Kevin Gardner.

ART 494 Topics: Gothic and Neo-Gothic Art and Architecture in Barcelona (3 hours)
The 13th to 15th centuries saw an extraordinary flourishing in artistic practices in Barcelona, and particularly in architecture along with the city and region's rise as a major Mediterranean power. Using the city of Barcelona, its medieval quarter and its museum collections, this class will study the development of Gothic art in the region. We will study both religious and secular structures and consider the development of the city from a small port city, to the royal capital. The last portion of the class will consider the rise of Neo-Gothic architecture in the 19th century as Catalan nationalism rose and emphasized this gothic era of independence and power. Artists such as Antoni Gaudi and Lluis Domenech i Muntaner will be considered along with the industrial expansion of the city. Taught in Barcelona by Dr. Eileen McKiernan-Gonzalez.

ART 430 Graphic Design: Berlin Style (3 hours)
German visual communications and design continue to be a powerful influence on the international commercial creative market. Students will be immersed in Berlin's distinctive creativity and business side of design and advertising, through visits to museums, architectural sites, design agencies, fashion and advertising studios. Expect a boot-camp style approach to graphic design, fashion, packaging, industrial, interior and dimensional design, with emphasis on professional application, form and function. Geared for creatives interested in the fields of advertising or graphic/interior/fashion/ architectural design, this program culminates with a student gallery exhibit and printed portfolio book featuring logo design, brochure and packaging concepts. Each book will be specific to the individual student's career goals and branding, and will be a tangible tool in marketing themselves as professionals in their chosen field. Taught in Berlin by Prof. Arden von Haeger.

ART 438 Advanced Graphics: Design Metropolis (3 hours)
Fine art, illustration and graphic design creatives will experience the dense sophistication of Berlin through her extraordinary art and design, with an emphasis on historic and current relevance to today's professional visual arts. Students will submerge in the traditional and experimental atmosphere of the German capital where visual arts, advertising and design thrives. From the International Design Center IDZ to the Kunst-Werke, Institute of Contemporary Art, Berlin has established itself as a hub of modern visual arts, attracting creative minds from all over the globe with its fascinating flair and vibrant atmosphere. And as a result, it is the perfect venue for students to explore traditional fine art forms of drawing, painting and anatomy; along with contemporary design concepts such as graphic design, typography, composition and advertising; illustrators will note European trends in telling the story; all experienced through real life application. Each student can expect to be inspired, challenged and provided with a fresh, deepened viewpoint of their own art, and will bring back a portfolio of work reflecting new skills and knowledge gained during their own Design Metropolis experience in Germany. Taught in Berlin by Prof. Arden von Haeger.

ART 496 Topics: Street Scenes Berlin: Digital Photo and Zine (3 hours) Graduate credit available
Students will use small digital cameras or their phones to shoot both still images and video to create an online e-zine of images to create a serve as a critical guide to contemporary art and artists showing in Berlin. Student will shoot, compile, interview and write small critiques of art in Berlin daily. No art background is required, but encouraged. The basics of composition and design elements will be taught and explored via the photographic images, social media and blog formats. Taught in Berlin by Dr. Doreen Maloney.

ART 491 Special Studies: The Art and Architecture of Florence and Rome (3 hours)
This course focuses on the masterpieces of painting, sculpture and architecture that may be seen and experienced in the streets, churches, and museums in these centers of artistic innovation and genius. Students will stand in awe before the column of Trajan and the remains of the Forum Romanum and beneath the domes of the Duomo and St. Peters. They will explore the haunts of Michelangelo, Raphael, Caravaggio, Bernini and ponder the frescoes of the Vatican Stanze, the Sistine Chapel, Santa Maria Novella and Il Jesu. This city-as-museum class will center on the artistic history of Italy, spotlighting the most famous ancient, medieval, Renaissance and Baroque works of Florence and Rome. Taught in Italy Winter by Prof. Jim Murley.

ART 243 Digital Media: Digital Time Capsule (3 hours)
Explore Italy while creating with the new-media platform of Adobe and posting to social-media sites like Pinterest, Instagram and Tumblr. Students will capture impressions from real life and the web, and will reassemble these for sharing on the internet. Students learn the principles of new media by working with advanced editing software. Taught in Italy by Prof. Lennon Michalski.

ART 340 Drawing III: Onsite Travel Journal (3 hours)
Students will work in media they can easily travel with, allowing for on-site information gathering. Emphasis is placed on the visual elements of mark making, gesture, line, value (darks and lights), perspective, positive and negative space, composition (use of the page), and on wet and dry media. Taught in Italy by Prof. Dale Leys.

ART 494 Seminar: Art of Italy (3 hours)
An exploration of great works of art from ancient to modern times. By visiting museums and cultural sites, we learn about the major periods of Italian art, the achievements of individual artists, aspects of social life that impacted art-making, and artistic styles and techniques. Taught in Italy by Dr. Chris Fulton.

ART 496 Topics: Digital Photography (3 hours)
Students will visit places of interest in the city and countryside. They will learn how to use their own digital SLR cameras and imaging software, preferably Adobe Photoshop, to enhance their photographic images and videos. Students enrolled in this course will need to bring a laptop equipped with imaging software. In the autumn of 2015, students will present their work in an art exhibition. Team taught in Italy by Prof. Lennon Michalski and Prof. Randy Simmons.

ART 491(H): Maya Mexico, Past & Present (3 hours) or HON 300 or GEOG 475 (H)
Open to Honors and non-Honors students with a 3.2 GPA and above, this inter-disciplinary, team-taught Winter program introduces students to the splendor of Mayan civilization and the present-day challenges facing the people of Mayan descent who reside in Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula and beyond. Students gain an appreciation of the agricultural, political, and cultural achievements of the historic Maya and grapple with such contemporary issues as regional and national identity, tourism and development, and social and environmental change. We employ a Place-as-Text approach, which encourages students, often in small groups, to take an active role in the direction of their learning. Taught in English on the Maya Mexico Winter by Dr. John Dizgun, Dr. Chris Fulton and Dr. Laura Hunt.

ART 491 Special Studies: Images in Arts Marketing (3 hours)
Advertising surrounds us. It is an integral part of our modern, media-based society. From a business and organizational perspective, it is also a critical aspect of the Marketing Mix (product, place, price and promotion). This course specifically focuses on the promotional aspects of marketing. In this course, students will be asked to shift their focus from a recipient of advertising messages to a creator and evaluator of communications strategies. Specifically focusing on the marketing messages of arts, entertainment and cultural activities, this course will examine key elements of promotion including target marketing, consumer preferences and biases, product branding, promotion strategies and cultural considerations. Taught in Paris I by Dr. Rachel Shane.

ART 491 Special Studies: Creativity and Innovation (3 hours)
This course combines theory and experiential activities in order to explore the main concepts of creativity and innovation. It will examine creativity from various levels of analysis including a review of creative process inquiry, examination of the world's most creative thinkers, and using ourselves as subjects. Additionally, the course will explore how creativity manifests as innovation through an investigation of entrepreneurial endeavors and organizational activities. Students will learn various tools to promote creativity within themselves and others, processes to increase innovation, how to contribute to a creative team, how to manage creativity, and how to establish a culture of creativity within an organization. Taught in Paris I by Dr. Rachel Shane.

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Biology
BIOL 280/ENV 280 Introduction to Environmental Science (3 hours)
This course presents an introduction to environmental science through an issue-based curriculum tying together content from the biological, ecological, and social sciences. Through local trips and student-centered activities, this interdisciplinary course will analyze the questions and resolutions revolving around four issues: 1) the processes and implications of forest fragmentation, 2) the challenges of measuring biodiversity; 3) the ways in which zoonotic human disease arise from land use change in the tropics, and 4) how ideas about what defines wilderness shape conservation practices. Taught in Costa Rica by Dr. Tony Stallins.

BIOL 475 Topics/GEOG 455 Global Environmental Change (3 hours)
In this cross-listed course, we document four global issues in Costa Rica. Because of ample opportunities to come into contact with unique fauna, the first of these issues centers on the wildlife trade. We then examine the ongoing transformations of the Costa Rican coffee industry, including the sampling of locally-grown beans. By engaging with local beekeepers, our third issue will revolve around how recent honey bee declines have played out in Costa Rica relative to North America. Finally, we will examine policy issues related to the management and conservation of fisheries through excursions to the coastal regions. Taught in Costa Rica by Dr. Tony Stallins.

BIOL 316 Evolution: Theory and Process (3 hours) Graduate credit available
Evolution is the foundational idea which unites all sub-disciplines of biology. It is also the central principle in biology which ties that science to the other sciences including astronomy, chemistry, geology, and physics. This course traces the historical development of evolutionary thought and explores modern evolutionary theory. We will capitalize on the richness of tropical ecosystems by integrating the historical and modern observations and inferences made by others with our own observations in rain forest, cloud forest, inter-Andean Valley, tropical montane ecosystems and the Galapagos Islands, giving students the experience to witness a unique ecosystem that played a pivotal historical role in the development of evolutionary ideas. Taught in Ecuador by Dr. David Hayes.

BIOL 475 Topics: Tropical Biodiversity and Conservation (3 hours) Graduate credit available
This course will provide an overview of the basic concepts of population, community, and ecosystem ecology in the context of the tropics. Lectures will focus on both ecological theory and application, and could include topics such as population growth, island biogeography, gradients of diversity, species interactions, nutrient cycling, and invasive species biology. An important component of this course will involve student-designed field research projects. Taught in Ecuador by Dr. Sarah Emery.

BIOL 475 Topics/GEOG 328 Elements of Biogeography (3 hours) Graduate credit available
In this cross-listed course, we examine interrelationships among climatic factors, vegetational biomes, and soil-forming processes, as well as human alteration of the biogeographical environment. This cross-listed course is co-taught in Ecuador by Dr. David Hayes and Prof. Ryan Kelly.

BIOL 485 Field Biology: Tropical Plant Ecology and Identification (3 hours) Graduate credit available
Ecuador is considered a "megadiverse hotspot" for plants. In this course, we will learn the basics of plant identification and focus on key traits, ecology, and economic roles of important plant families in the tropics and world-wide. A large portion of this class will involve using keys to identify plants from a variety of ecosystems within Ecuador including dry forest, rain forest, cloud forest, alpine tundra, and coastal habitats. Skills gained in this course can be applied to plant identification in any ecosystem. Taught in Ecuador by Dr. Sarah Emery.

BIOL 485 Field Biology: Galapagos (1 credit hour) Graduate credit available
As we visit the famous volcanic islands situated 600 miles off Ecuador's coast in the Pacific Ocean, we will study their geologic origin and history, and explore their role in the development of evolutionary thought. We will visit several of their unique ecosystems including dry lowlands and the moister volcanic highlands, and snorkel in the rich surrounding waters. We will talk with Galapagos residents to gain a fuller understanding of the history of human occupation of the islands and the challenges ahead for preserving this fascinating archipelago. This course, open only to students who select the optional Galapagos program extension, is co-taught in Ecuador by Dr. Sarah Emery and Dr. David Hayes.

BIOL 485 Field Biology: Tanzanian Natural History, Conservation, and Ecotourism (3 hours)
Tanzania is thought to be the most biodiverse country in all of mainland Africa with its 1,108 species of birds, 364 mammals, 650 species of reptiles and amphibians, and 829 species of freshwater fish. While we will be unable to learn about all these animals, we will survey the species we will most likely see while on safari in Ngorongoro Conservation Area and Zanizbar. We will also study those species most critically endangered, such as the Black Rhinoceros and the continent's rarest forest antelope, Ader's Duiker. Focus will also be on new important species such as the kipunji, the first new monkey genus discovered in Africa in more than 80 years. Conservation challenges for the area include poverty, education, human and wildlife health concerns, population growth, governance issues, and modest technical and financial resources. We will also discuss how ecotourism has impacted the peoples in the areas we will be traveling and for the country in general. Taught in Tanzania by Dr. Suzanne Strait.

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Business Administration
BA 592 Topics in Business (3 hours) Graduate level only
The course / internship will be administered in collaborative and applied learning environments where students will be teamed up with their Tanzanian counterparts in roundtable and site visits to learn, compare and share experiences in health care and business sectors. The Ministry of Health (MOH) and Social Welfare will be the collaborating agency for MHA students, while the Tanzania Chamber of Commerce Industry and Agriculture (TCCIA) will provide the learning experience for MBA students. With a focus on health and business administration, the Executives in Zanzibar Winter program will offer internship opportunities that meet specific professional interests of MHA, MPA, and MBA students. The program will support the students by making the necessary arrangements for relevant administrative internship experiences in agencies that will assist the students in applying their knowledge and skills in an environment consistent with their fields of study. These internships have been designed to accumulate at least 37.5 contact hours in the two weeks of the program in Zanzibar. Taught in Executives in Zanzibar (Winter) by Dr. William Mkanta.

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Chinese
CHIN 101 Elementary Chinese I (3 hours)
Conversational Mandarin with basic grammar and basic functional vocabulary of the Chinese language. Includes aspects of contemporary Chinese culture. Taught in China by Dr. Qian Gao.

CHIN 105 Introduction to Chinese Cultures (3 hours)
This course is a preliminary introduction to Chinese civilization, beginning with the archaeological record and extending to the nineteen century. Considering the broad period and rich tradition we will cover, approximately three thousand years of Chinese culture, this course will focus on a few themes and a few approaches instead of providing a comprehensive survey of the history of Chinese civilization. The purpose of this course is to provide a basic understanding of the development of Chinese tradition and the complicity of its culture by looking in depth the following questions: what forces came together to produce Chinese civilization and how did they contribute to the formation of the notion of "Chineseness" over time? What were the roles of intellectual or philosophical thinkers in the development of Chinese cultural tradition? How can literature reveal details of the way people lived, the values they believed and the ideas they followed? This course must be taken in conjunction with one of the other China course offerings. Taught in China by Dr. He Jianjun.

CHIN 201 Intermediate Chinese I (3 hours)
Expansion of communication skills in increasingly complex and varied situations. Emphasis on conversational speaking, presentational writing and speaking, and understanding culturally specific texts and media. Taught in China by Dr. He Jianjun.

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Communication
COMM 263 Fundamentals of Communication and Culture (3 hours)
This course provides an overview of communication patterns as influenced by surrounding culture, and how culture is created and sustained through communication. It will focus on communication across cultural boundaries in the context of the Spanish program site. Taught in Spain May by Prof. Vicki Wilson.

COMM 330: Leadership Communication (3 hours)
This course is designed to create an understanding of the role that communication plays in various leadership contexts and situations. Business and tourist locations in Austria will be used as case studies to enhance practical awareness of leadership qualities and communication in and between cultures. Emphasis is placed on the development of qualities of good leadership that are essential for career and organizational success. The course will focus on developing a collaborative leadership style to enhance team commitment and individual performance. The course will also focus on deepening self-awareness of leadership qualities. Taught in Austria by Dr. Ann Andaloro.

COMM 463 Intercultural Communication (3 hours)
This course is designed to create an understanding of dimensions of communication theory that apply across cultural boundaries. Emphasis is placed on both theoretical and practical awareness of communication in and between cultures. This course fulfills a core requirement for Communication Studies and Corporate and Organizational Communication majors. Taught in Austria by Dr. Ann Andaloro.

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Economics
ECON 434 Economics of Healthcare (3 hours)
Healthcare cost and quality are center of attention in the U.S. This course is to get insights on more efficient healthcare system and healthcare providers operations by comparison across U.S. and European countries. The course will be organized in two sections: healthcare financing systems (macro policy) and healthcare providers' management (micro operation). Topics covered include access and quality of care, cost containment, and financing structures, etc. Taught in Austria by Dr. Bo Shi.

ECON 380 International Economics (3 hours)
This course will introduce the theory of international trade and monetary relations with an emphasis on the determinants of the direction, volume, terms, and gains from international trade. The course will discuss the movement of goods, services, labor, and the capital between countries, various economic factors that shape patterns of trade, scale economy and monopolistic competition, trade tariffs and quotas, as well as international trade agreements. We will also cover foreign exchange markets, factors that determine the foreign exchange rates, the balance of payments for national and trade accounts, and the coordination of monetary and fiscal policies in a global economy. Taught in Austria by Dr. Kevin Zhao.

ECON 410 Topics: Issues in the Global Economy (3 hours) Graduate credit available
This course is intended to provide students with an introduction to theory and policy of international trade and finance, so they can better understand international economic relations. The impact of globalization on the socio-economic and political development in Latin American countries will be explored. Current economic issues in Chile such as economic development, poverty, inequality, regional economic integration, inflation, and unemployment will be emphasized. We will take advantage of our location to incorporate Chilean peoples and places into our course work. Taught in Chile by Dr. Rod Erfani.

ECON 410 Topics: World Economic Systems (3 hours) Graduate credit available
This course compares and analyzes the major economic systems of the world in theory and practice. Economic issues in Latin America will be emphasized. Macroeconomic issues such as development policies including import-substituting industrialization policies and market-oriented reforms will be analyzed. Microeconomic issues such as poverty, inequality, education, and corruption will be examined. We will take advantage of our location to incorporate Chilean peoples and places into our course work. Taught in Chile by Dr. Rod Erfani.

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English
ENG 290 Study Abroad: Italian Stories (3 hours)
In this course we read a number of colorful short stories by famous Italian authors from Boccaccio to Pirandello. We relate the recounted experiences of fictional characters to the real life we observe in present-day Italy. Taught in English, in Italy by Dr. Melody Carriere.

ENG 349 Topics: The Road to Athens - Travel Writing and the Greece Experience (3 hours)
This course explores the travel writing genre and how it represents Greece as a historical and cultural tourist destination. Students will study how diverse travel writing guides and texts (think Anthony Bourdain, Samantha Brown, and the Let's Go series) thematically represent the country, and will use those texts to help develop their own travel guides on Greece. Taught in Greece by Dr. Jeffrey Rice.

ENG 396/RELS 399 Mythology: Greek Myth in Context (3 hours) Honors credit available
No stories contain greater richness and depth and none have been more influential than those we call "Greek myths". In this class students learn important ancient Greek tales while visiting sites in which many of these myths are said to have taken place—Athens, Eleusis, Delos, Delphi, Argos, and Mycenae. Meanwhile, students learn to read these tales as represented in Greek art—on vases and in sculpture that we view. Note: any student with a 3.2 GPA or above can enroll in this course for Honors credit. Students enrolled for Honors credit will have more challenging and unconventional assignments that will require greater analytical, creative, and critical thinking skills. Taught in Greece by Dr. Richard King.

ENG 399 Topics: Ancient Greek Rhetoric - Past and Future (3 hours)
This course studies rhetoric-or the art of persuasive discourse-in its Grecian birthplace. Students will read texts from ancient Greek rhetoricians like Aristotle, Isocrates, and Gorgias, and consider how rhetoric influenced ancient Greek culture, religion, philosophy, and politics. Students will also study how ancient Greek rhetoric influences the way we think, communicate, and ultimately relate to one another today. Taught in Greece by Dr. Jeffrey Rice.

ENG 203 Creative Writing (3 hours)
This course is an introduction to the writing of poetry, fiction, creative nonfiction through the lens of travel writing. In this course we focus on learning the techniques of travel writing, which we will then apply to specific experiences and settings in this city. Through an examination of techniques of description, narration, and mood, we attempt to command one's experiences, as a process of clarifying one's experience in Istanbul. Taught in Istanbul by Dr. Alan Gravano.

ENG 339 Topics: Istanbul in Contemporary Literature (3 hours)
A study of representative contemporary literature focusing on writers who have been attracted to Istanbul. We will focus on literature set in or influenced by Istanbul with readings that include but are not limited to essays, travelogues, poems, novellas, novels, and short stories by Herman Melville, Mark Twain, Ernest Hemingway, John Dos Passos, Paul Bowles, James Baldwin, and Orhan Pamuk. Taught in Istanbul by Dr. Alan Gravano.

ENG Study Abroad: The Inferno: From Dante to Dan Brown (3 hours)
Begin in Florence where Dante was born and fell in love with the mysterious Beatrice. Accompany Dante on his tour of the Inferno, guided by none other than Virgil. Follow Dan Brownss Robert Langdon (fictional Harvard Professor of Symbology) in his quest to save the world from an apocalyptic modern "Inferno". Visit locations related to Dante's life and Brown's novel: the Uffizi, the Boboli Gardens, the Ponte Vecchio, and others. Experience New Year's Eve in Florence and New Year's Day in Rome. See Rome's fountains, the Coliseum, St. Peter's, the Vatican Museum and much more. Taught in Italy Winter by Prof. Bernard Lewis.

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Environmental Science
ENV 280/BIOL 280 Introduction to Environmental Science (3 hours)
This course presents an introduction to environmental science through an issue-based curriculum tying together content from the biological, ecological, and social sciences. Through local trips and student-centered activities, this interdisciplinary course will analyze the questions and resolutions revolving around four issues: 1) the processes and implications of forest fragmentation, 2) the challenges of measuring biodiversity; 3) the ways in which zoonotic human disease arise from land use change in the tropics, and 4) how ideas about what defines wilderness shape conservation practices. Taught in Costa Rica by Dr. Tony Stallins.

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Film
FILM 399 Topics: Modern China through Film (3 hours)
An introduction to the cinemas of mainland China, Hong Kong, and Taiwan, with a focus on how social, political and cultural changes of modern and contemporary China find their expressions in films. Students will learn basic skills for understanding and interpreting cinematic language and see beyond what is pleasing to the eye or entertaining: the sociopolitical circumstances under which Chinese films are made, their subtle ambiguities as well as overt messages, and their interpretations of history, the relationship between individual filmmakers' aesthetic styles and social concerns, among other things. Selected film topics include: the "golden days" of Chinese leftist cinema in the 1930s and 1940s; the imperative to create "socialist realist" art in China under Mao's leadership; the challenge to official ideology after the end of the Cultural Revolution; the attempts to capture the changing faces and new mysteries of China with a globalizing economy; contemporary Hong Kong and Taiwan films about urban life and cultural hybridity; and the representations of gender and China's cultural past in martial arts fantasies. Taught in China by Dr. Qian Gao.

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Finance
FIN 436 International Financial Management (3 hours)
Being able to manage firms with international scope is very important in the integrated global financial market. This course aims at introducing fundamental international financial management skills and having students apply under various circumstances. Topics covered include environment of international financial management, foreign exchange risk management, foreign investment analysis, and financing foreign operations. Taught in Austria by Dr. Bo Shi.

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French
FREN 210 Intermediate French Conversation Abroad (3 hours)
Students will concentrate on improving their French conversation skills, while developing competency with more complicated grammatical structures and expanding their knowledge of French culture and history. This course will make use of a variety of authentic materials, and will also require students to practice their language skills in and gather information from Paris and its surroundings. Prerequisite: one year of college French or equivalent. Taught in Paris I by Prof. Eddy Cuisinier.

FREN 306 Experiencing French Abroad: City of Light - Paris in Cinema (3 hours)
Paris has always fascinated people around the world. Through this class, students will be able to have a better understanding of and be more sensitive to the way the French and the Americans perceive Paris in different ways while trying to find their place in this multicultural metropolis. Specific movies made by French and American directors will be shown and excursions will allow first-hand experiences. Taught in Paris I by Prof. Eddy Cuisinier.

FREN 306 Experiencing French Abroad: Literary Perspectives on Occupied France (3 hours)
Between 1940 and 1944, there were, in effect, two Frances: the northern half of the country occupied by the Nazis, and the southern "Free" Vichy France which collaborated with the Germans. Reality, however, is never that clear-cut. This class will focus on gaining an understanding of this interesting and controversial period in French history through readings, film, visits to key sites in Paris, and class discussions. Taught in Paris II by Dr. Wendy Yoder.

FREN 323 French Civilization and Culture: Graphic Paris (3 hours)
The city of Paris has been visually represented in every art form for centuries: paintings, sculptures, photos, film, and graphic novels. This course will examine the visual representations of Paris in comics, or bande dessinee. From the highly respected Louvre series to literary adaptations and historical narratives, we will see how artists portray the city and the effect this has. Taught in Paris II by Prof. Jeorg Sauer.

FREN 420 Advanced French Composition and Stylistics (3 hours)
Discover Paris by reading what French writers over the centuries have had to say about the city. Develop an appreciation of how the author makes each place come to life through the choice of language and stylistics. Expand your ability to write in French through an awareness of the similarities and differences that exist between it and English. Visit the sites with the class - then apply your understanding of the techniques, grammar, and vocabulary studied to describe the sites in French using your own words, creating a style of your own. Taught in Paris II by Dr. Wendy Yoder.

FREN 426 French Literature of the Twentieth Century: French Theatre in Performance (3 hours)
The goal of this course is to explore the history of the French theater by attending performances of plays in Paris. We will see at least one production per week. Prior to the performances, we will read and discuss the texts of the scheduled play, and, following the performance, continue our discussion through analyses of production choices made by the director and actors. The plays we choose will depend on what is being shown in Paris during the five weeks of our course. We will try to see works from different genres-comedy, tragedy, experimental, etc.-and from different historical periods. We will emphasize textual analysis, as well as principles of production: staging, costumes, acting, set design, lighting, music, etc. Taught in Paris II by Dr. Jeff Peters.

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Gender & Women's Studies
GWS 470 Topics/THEA 375 Topics: Vixens and Virgins in Classical Greek Theatre (3 hours)
From the tragic heroine to the vengeful murderess, we will explore many of the dynamic female characters in ancient Greek text. Through discussion, writing and small group exercises, we will investigate how these sharply drawn characters have shaped popular culture and have influenced feminism and our own views of women in contemporary society. Taught in Greece by Dr. Deborah Martin.

GWS 470 Topics: Gendering Myth (3 hours)
As we experience Italy, we will be on the lookout for examples of myth in the cultural landscape (paintings, sculptures, public spaces). We will use this evidence to discuss how myths reflect cultural attitudes about femininity and masculinity, while also exploring what it means to be a man or a woman in the 21st century. Taught in Italy by Prof. Jennifer White.

GWS 470 Topics/SOCL 489 Sociology Study Abroad: Gender in Latin America (3 hours)
The social construction of gender is explored through an analysis of the role of women in Mexico's political history. A survey of historical and modern figures is done through an examination of art, music, poetry, film, novels and scholarly articles focusing on women's active participation in politics with consideration to whether they have moved beyond the bad woman-good mother archetypes. Taught in Merida, Mexico by Dr. Kimberly Pitts.

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GEOG 328 Elements of Biogeography/BIOL 475 Topics(3 hours)
In this cross-listed course, we examine interrelationships among climatic factors, vegetational biomes, and soil-forming processes, as well as human alteration of the biogeographical environment. This cross-listed course is co-taught in Ecuador by Prof. Ryan Kelly and Dr. David Hayes.

Geography/Environmental Studies
GEOG 455 Global Environmental Change / BIOL 485 Field Biology (3 hours)
Through field-based study, we document four global issues in Costa Rica. Because of ample opportunities to come into contact with unique fauna, the first of these issues centers on the wildlife trade. We then examine the ongoing transformations of the Costa Rican coffee industry, including the sampling of locally-grown beans. By engaging with local beekeepers, our third issue will revolve around how recent honey bee declines have played out in Costa Rica relative to North America. Finally, we will examine policy issues related to the management and conservation of fisheries through excursions to the coastal regions. Taught in Costa Rica by Dr. Tony Stallins.

GEOG 475 Topics: Chile, Globalization, and the Geopolitics of Place (3 hours) Graduate credit available
A survey of Chile's geography, resources, and geopolitics in the broader context of the Southern Cone and South America generally, with a focus on the 20th and 21st centuries. Using the "Place as Text" model, we examine physical, cultural, and imagined landscapes to understand modern Chile and its view of itself in the global system. Though sampling various locational characteristics and contextualizing Chile in terms of its social, economic, and geopolitical goals and aspirations, students will gain a detailed understanding of Ser Chileno ("Being Chilean"), and what this means for sociopolitical development, national identity, and global change. We will take advantage of our location to incorporate Chilean peoples and places into our course work. Taught in Chile by Dr. David Keeling and Dr. John Dizgun.

GEOG 475(H) or ART 491(H) or HON 300: Maya Mexico, Past & Present (3 hours)
Open to Honors and non-Honors students with a 3.2 GPA and above, this inter-disciplinary, team-taught Winter program introduces students to the splendor of Mayan civilization and the present-day challenges facing the people of Mayan descent who reside in Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula and beyond. Students gain an appreciation of the agricultural, political, and cultural achievements of the historic Maya and grapple with such contemporary issues as regional and national identity, tourism and development, and social and environmental change. We employ a Place-as-Text approach, which encourages students, often in small groups, to take an active role in the direction of their learning. Taught in English on the Maya Mexico Winter by Dr. John Dizgun, Dr. Chris Fulton and Dr. Laura Hunt.

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German
GERM 105 Introduction to Germanic Culture (3 hours)
German 105 is a survey of the culture of Germany, with emphasis on values, behavioral characteristics, social, political, and physical structures, history, and achievements of German speaking peoples. The course considers Berlin to be its textbook; readings, lectures, and excursions will center on German culture as it expresses itself through and in the German capital. Only taught abroad. This class is taught in English and must be taken with another class during the program. Taught in Berlin by Dr. Sylvia Henneberg.

GERM 100 German Language and Culture Onsite: Basic Conversation (3 hours)
Students will rapidly develop their ability to comprehend and communicate in German through the acquisition of basic grammatical structures and vocabulary useful in a variety of real-life situations. This course will focus on all four core linguistic competencies: speaking, listening reading and writing. Furthermore, students will make use of the city of Bregenz in completing a number of immersive, cultural assignments in pursuit of a deeper understanding of German/Austrian culture and language. This course must be taken in conjunction with one of the other Austria course offerings. No previous knowledge of German is expected or required. Taught in Austria by Prof. Jordan Gabbard.

German 210 Intermediate German Conversation Abroad (3 hours)
Students will concentrate on improving their German conversation skills, while developing competency with more complicated grammatical structures and expanding their knowledge of German/Austrian culture and history. This course will make use of a variety of authentic materials, and will also require students to practice their language skills in and gather information from Bregenz and its surroundings. Prerequisite: one year of college German or equivalent. Taught in Austria by Prof. Laurie LeCompte.

GERM 306 Experiencing German Abroad: The Cultural Heritage of Munich (3 hours)
This course is designed for an in-depth exploration of the history and culture of Munich and Bavaria. Students practice their written, reading, listening and spoken German language skills while enjoying afternoon excursions into Munich and a weekend trip to Nuremberg. There are further opportunities to visit other German cities during independent travel weekends. Taught in Munich by Dr. Thom Heine.

GERM 330 German Composition and Conversation (3 hours)
Develops skill in writing and speaking standard German. Stress is on vocabulary building, use of dictionary and control of sentence structures. Skill in spoken German is aimed at enabling the students to find their way around the environment and to function in a social situation. Taught in Munich by Dr. Laura Wilson.

GERM 430 Advanced German Stylistics (3 hours)
Provides intensive grammar instruction and practice in written and spoken German, enabling the student to write letters, reports, essays, and descriptions. Students investigate aspects of German structure that they notice around them. Taught in Munich by Dr. Laura Wilson.

GERM 455 Topics: Drama and Film (3 hours)
By reading, role-playing, and attending dramas playing on Munich stages, this course provides students with a survey of German drama since the end of the eighteenth century as well as a close examination of the conflicts and issues of individual dramas. The film segment primarily involves attending and journaling about several screenings of films shown in the context of the Munich Film Festival, which takes place during the program. Taught in Munich by Dr. Thom Heine.

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Graduate Courses
A selection of study abroad courses (taught in English) is offered for graduate credit to students who have completed their undergraduate degree. For course descriptions, see corresponding undergraduate course in the specific subject area. If interested in additional Graduate course possibilities or offerings on KIIS programs, contact Dr. John Dizgun.

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Health Care Administration/Public Health
HCA 347 International Health: Comparative Health Systems (3 hours) Graduate credit available
This course examines both global health issues and health systems from a comparative perspective. This course will begin by discussing global health themes, including: international health organizations, right to health, access to medicines, significant international health issues, women's health, children's health, and the environment and health. We will define "health systems" and explore what they do and how they have evolved. We will focus on understanding the configuration of health systems, examining different frameworks for healthcare delivery, financing, coverage, and allocation of resources. Students will also learn about select health care systems around the globe and review the structure and functioning of their health systems. Country-level debates on issues such as access to care and funding will be explored as well as how a country's history has influenced the development of its health system. Taught in Tanzania by Dr. Monika Sawhney.

HCA 459 Global Health Service-Learning Practicum (3-6 hours) Graduate credit available
The Global Health Service-Learning (GHSL) practicum opens doors for both undergraduate and graduate students in health professions such as medicine, nursing, nutrition, social work, and health administration to apply their skills alongside their Tanzanian counterparts while serving the health needs of the community. Key populations targeted by the program include the youth, HIV/AIDS patients, orphans, and a university community. The GHSL practicum can also be taken as an internship for students in health-related majors. Taught in Tanzania by Dr. William Mkanta.

PH 469 Critical Issues: Maternal and Child Health (3 hours) Graduate credit available
The course will introduce students to the main concepts of the public health field and the critical links between global health and social and economic development. Students will get an overview of the determinants of health, and how health status is measured, and students will also review the burden of disease, risk factors, and key measures to address the burden of disease in cost-effective ways. The course will cover key concepts and frameworks that are very practical in orientation. The course will be global in coverage but with an important focus on the developing world and on the health of the poor. Taught in Tanzania by Dr. Monika Sawhney.

HCA 572 Topics in Health Services (3 hours) Graduate level only
The course / internship will be administered in collaborative and applied learning environments where students will be teamed up with their Tanzanian counterparts in roundtable and site visits to learn, compare and share experiences in health care and business sectors. The Ministry of Health (MOH) and Social Welfare will be the collaborating agency for MHA students, while the Tanzania Chamber of Commerce Industry and Agriculture (TCCIA) will provide the learning experience for MBA students. With a focus on health and business administration, the Executives in Zanzibar Winter program will offer internship opportunities that meet specific professional interests of MHA, MPA, and MBA students. The program will support the students by making the necessary arrangements for relevant administrative internship experiences in agencies that will assist the students in applying their knowledge and skills in an environment consistent with their fields of study. These internships have been designed to accumulate at least 37.5 contact hours in the two weeks of the program in Zanzibar. Taught in Executives in Zanzibar (Winter) by Dr. William Mkanta.

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History
HIST 490 Topics: Jews, Christian, and Muslims in Spain (3 hours)
Some people have described medieval Iberia as a land of tolerance and convivencia-a kind of mutual living-togetherness. Others have imagined it as a society organized for war and crusade. This course will use resources at hand in Barcelona (such as a walking tour of the Jewish neighborhood and the medieval synagogue), plus documents from the time period, to explore how all three religious groups lived in such close proximity for so many centuries. The class will particularly focus on Barcelona and the surrounding kingdom-the medieval Crown of Aragon. We'll also discuss how this history continues to inspire and influence, and we'll investigate the experiences of minority populations in Spain today. Taught in Barcelona by Dr. Gretchen Starr-LeBeau.

HIST 490 Topics: Dictatorship, Democracy, Independence? Barcelona's Culture and History (3 hours)
Barcelona is a vibrant city with a rich tradition of cultural, artistic, and culinary excellence. It has also suffered devastating conflict, and even today remains deeply divided on some central issues of its identity. This class explores Barcelona's legacy-from its place at the forefront of the modernist movement, to its subordinate status during the years of the Franco dictatorship, to the rapid changes in language, culture, and politics after the transition to democracy in the 1970s and 1980s. We'll also discuss the aftermath of the projected referendum on Catalan independence from Spain, which the regional government intends to hold in November 2014 despite federal opposition. Walking tours through the city will give students the opportunity to identify the multi-layered history and culture of the city visible today. Taught in Barcelona by Dr. Gretchen Starr-LeBeau.

HIST 426 Hitler and Nazi Germany (3 hours)
This course traces the origins and impact of National Socialism in Germany. We will investigate Adolf Hitler's early life, his political ideology, and the Nazis' rise to power. Particular emphasis will be placed on the Hitler's attempts to create a "new" Germany and the horrific consequences of his bid to dominate Europe. Taught in Berlin by Dr. Tim Welliver.

HIST 490 Topics: Germany, Europe, and the Cold War (3 hours)
Berlin stood at the center of Cold War tensions, from the 1948 blockade to the 1989 fall of the Berlin Wall. We will explore the Cold War from its origins in Allied wartime tensions through the collapse of Communism, including the contrasting experiences of East and West, the problems with reunification, and the conflict's human toll. Taught in Berlin by Dr. Tim Welliver.

HIST 490 Topics: Modern Europe and the Danish Microcosm (3 hours)
This course will explore modern European history from the sixteenth-century Scientific Revolution through the Twentieth Century, using Denmark as both focal point and lens. This small, outlying kingdom has sometimes contributed significantly to Europe's major religious, cultural, social, and political developments, and at other times has been forced to react to events and wider trends originating elsewhere. Unlike traditional European history courses that emphasize France, England, and the Holy Roman Empire as the centers of action, the course will emphasize how history looks different when told from varied perspectives. Taught in Denmark by Dr. Carolyn Dupont.

HIST 490 Topics: Day to Day in Ancient Greece (3 hours) Graduate or Honors credit available
What did the ancients wear? eat? hate? love? How did they spend their days and nights? How did they survive without the car, movies, texting? How did they make their money? What did they think about the good life, death, politics, sex? Why do we care? This course explores the ordinary lives of ancient Greeks- and of the Romans, Jews, and Christians who lived near them- as we wander their towns and poke our noses into what remains of their homes, temples, stores, streets. Taught in Greece by Dr. Chris Shea.

HIST 490 Topics: The History of Roman Greece (3 hours)
An inquiry into the ways in which classical Greece was transformed by the Roman conquest of the Eastern Mediterranean through an examination of literary, historical, and archaeological sources that address issues of social, political, religious, and economic change. Also considers the nature of imperialism and the absorption and modification of subjugated Greek traditions by victorious Romans. Taught in Greece by Prof. Kathleen Quinn.

HIST 479 Topics: The Ottoman Empire - A Social, Political, and Religious History (3 hours)
Engages (by way of readings, discussion and excursions) the history (and religions) of the Ottoman Empire from its inception in the 13th century to its apogee in the 16th century. Along with texts and novels, we use the rich Ottoman culture and architecture that remains for us in Istanbul to decipher this complex and powerful empire. Taught in Istanbul by Dr. Tom McCollough.

HIST 461 Modern East Asia (3 hours)
A comparative history of Japan and China from 1600, to the post WW II era. Special attention will be paid to traditional societies and governments, meeting the challenge of the industrial west, and the differing approaches and problems in modernization in the twentieth century which led to a direct confrontation in WW II and continuing tension today over such issues as Senkaku/Diaoyu Islands. China and Japan are today the # 2 and 3 economic powers; we'll see how they got there. Taught in Japan by Dr. Charlotte Beahan.

HIST 490 Topics: World War II in Asia and the Pacific (3 hours)
An examination of the origins and course of the war that began in Manchuria in 1931, expanded to China south of the Great Wall in July of 1937, from there to Pearl Harbor, Southeast and South Asia and the Pacific Islands by late 1941, and ended at Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Known variously as the Pacific War (America), the Greater East Asia War (Japan), and the Anti-Japanese War (China), the conflict had far-reaching and long-lasting consequences for all those states caught up in it, not least of all Japan itself. Taught in Japan by Dr. Charlotte Beahan.


HIST 422 The French Revolution and Napoleon (3 hours)
This course provides students with a detailed look at the French Revolution-its causes, goals, course, and outcomes-focusing in particular on events in Paris, the epicenter of the Revolution. The city serves as our classroom and together we visit such iconic sites as the Place de la Bastille, the Conciergerie, the Place de la Concorde, the Louvre and other places of revolutionary relevance. To grasp the Revolution's various causes, students begin by reading the Ancien Regime and the ways that government, politics, economy, and society functioned under the French monarchy. Then we examine the accomplishments, culture, and course of the Revolution as it grew progressively more radical, culminating in the Reign of Terror in 1794. Finally, we examine the later years of the Revolution under the Directory, ending our study with Napoleon's seizing of power in 1799. Taught in Paris I by Dr. Francois Le Roy.

HIST 490 Topics: Battleground of Empires (3 hours) Graduate credit available
Focuses mainly on the peoples, histories and cultures of Slavic Europe with special emphasis on the Soviet and German occupations. The class combines traditional class activities with excursions to relevant places of interest in Eastern Europe and the surrounding countryside. Students are asked to critically examine their encounters with Slavic society. Includes an opportunity to present a paper at an international student conference (must consult with the professor prior to departure). Taught in Slavic Europe by Dr. Adrian Mandzy.

HIST 490 Topics: War and Memory in Eastern Europe (3 hours) Graduate credit available
Explores how societies in Eastern Europe memorialize twentieth century wars. A society's war memorials affect future military mobilization, define national and civic identity, and provide solace to the families of the fallen. This course will examine issues of war, death, and memorialization in Eastern Europe generally, and in Warsaw and Auschwitz in particular. We will survey transformations in various memorial sites over time, and engage with these sites and their legacies in person. The political transformations from the Austro-Hungarian Empire to the Soviet Union to current Eastern European states will be explored through the various layers of war memorials. Taught in Slavic Europe by Dr. Karen Petrone.

HIST 491 Topics: World War II and the Holocaust in Eastern Europe (3 hours)
Eastern Europe was the fulcrum of the Second World War: the site of its most decisive conflict, the war between Nazi Germany and the Soviet Union; the primary area in which the killings of the Holocaust were implemented; and the scene of bitter struggles among Ukrainians, Poles, Russians and others that comprised a "war within the war". This course focuses on the relationship between war and genocide, concentrating on the experiences of war in the Slavic regions of Eastern Europe. Topics include the military history of the Nazi-Soviet War, home fronts, life under German occupation, genocide & ethnic cleansing, resistance & collaboration, and ethnic conflicts among Slavic Europeans and others. Taught in Slavic Europe by Dr. Ken Slepyan.

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Honors Courses
Any student with a 3.2 GPA or above can enroll in these courses for Honors credit. Students enrolled for Honors credit will have more challenging and unconventional assignments that will require greater analytical, creative, and critical thinking skills. If interested in an Honors Augmentation on KIIS programs, contact Dr. John Dizgun.

HON 300: Maya Mexico, Past & Present (3 hours)
Open to Honors and non-Honors students with a 3.2 GPA and above, this inter-disciplinary, team-taught Winter program introduces students to the splendor of Mayan civilization and the present-day challenges facing the people of Mayan descent who reside in Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula and beyond. Students gain an appreciation of the agricultural, political, and cultural achievements of the historic Maya and grapple with such contemporary issues as regional and national identity, tourism and development, and social and environmental change. We employ a Place-as-Text approach, which encourages students, often in small groups, to take an active role in the direction of their learning. Taught in English on the Maya Mexico Winter by Dr. John Dizgun, Dr. Chris Fulton and Dr. Laura Hunt.

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Internships & Service-Learning
The Internship & Service-Learning courses below are open to undergraduate and graduate. Additional international internships may be available.

LEAD 475/CNS 595: KIIS Leadership Practicum Internship (Internship - 3 credits)
(Graduate students & Undergraduate seniors only)
The Assistant to the Program Director Internship enables students to shadow a summer or winter KIIS program director. In consultation with the KIIS office and KIIS director, the student creates a personalized work plan outlining the duties and responsibilities to be performed. Previous interns have assisted with residence life duties, accounting and administration, orientation, risk management, and communication between students & faculty. Interns apply for a specific KIIS program and receive a $300 scholarship. Contact Dr. John Dizgun or Rebekah Golla for details.

HCA 459 Global Health Service-Learning Practicum (3-6 hours)
The Global Health Service-Learning (GHSL) practicum opens doors for both undergraduate and graduate students in health professions such as medicine, nursing, nutrition, social work, and health administration to apply their skills alongside their Tanzanian counterparts while serving the health needs of the community. Key populations targeted by the program include the youth, HIV/AIDS patients, orphans, and a university community. The GHSL practicum can also be taken as an internship for students in health-related majors. Taught in Tanzania by Dr. William Mkanta.

HCA 459G: Global Health Service-Learning Practicum (3 hours) or BA 592: Special Topics in Business (3 hours) (Graduate level only)
The course / internship will be administered in collaborative and applied learning environments where students will be teamed up with their Tanzanian counterparts in roundtable and site visits to learn, compare and share experiences in health care and business sectors. The Ministry of Health (MOH) and Social Welfare will be the collaborating agency for MHA students, while the Tanzania Chamber of Commerce Industry and Agriculture (TCCIA) will provide the learning experience for MBA students. With a focus on health and business administration, the Executives in Zanzibar Winter program will offer internship opportunities that meet specific professional interests of MHA, MPA, and MBA students. The program will support the students by making the necessary arrangements for relevant administrative internship experiences in agencies that will assist the students in applying their knowledge and skills in an environment consistent with their fields of study. These internships have been designed to accumulate at least 37.5 contact hours in the two weeks of the program in Zanzibar. Taught in Executives in Zanzibar (Winter) by Dr. William Mkanta.

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Italian
ITAL 100 Italian Language and Culture Onsite: Basic Conversation (3 hours)
This course covers basic Italian vocabulary, expressions and grammar as well as culture through daily outings to coffee shops, train stations, open air markets, etc. Students are given an opportunity to visit art galleries, churches and other area of interest. Due to the brevity of the stay, students are expected to participate actively in order to make the most out of the course. Daily written assignments and discussion topics will be assigned. There may be no formal classroom for this course. Instead we may use whatever found space we have to find our inspiration. No previous knowledge of Italian is expected or required. Taught in Italy Winter by Prof. Vesna Alac.

ITAL 100 Italian Language and Culture Onsite: Basic Conversation (3 hours)
Delve into speaking Italian - one of the most beautiful languages in the world. This course introduces students to conversational language and basic grammar, and brings them into contact with the country's daily life and popular culture. We utilize language to explore the native environment and connect directly with local people. Topics include: introductions, asking and receiving directions, making reservations, negotiating public transportation, numbers and time, shopping, ordering in restaurants, and making new friends. This course must be taken in conjunction with one of the other Italy course offerings. No previous knowledge of Italian is expected or required. Taught in Italy by Dr. Melody Carriere.

ITAL 105: Introduction to Italian Culture: La Dolce Vita ("The Sweet Life") (3 hours)
We will draw upon our experience in Italy to discover how food, drink, social relationships, the arts, and history contribute to the Italians' love affair with life itself. As a class and in small er groups we will explore the local culture and the distinctively Italian ideal of "la dolce vite". This course must be taken in conjunction with one of the other Italy course offerings. Taught in Italy by Prof. Jennifer White.

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Japanese
JAPN 210 Intermediate Japanese Conversation Abroad (3 hours)
A course designed to develop the vocabulary and oral communication skills of the student with a background of one year of college Japanese or equivalent. Emphasis is placed on bringing the student into contact with Japanese native speakers and various aspects of their culture. Taught in Japanese in Japan by Prof. Yoko Hatakeyama.

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Leadership Studies
LEAD 475 Leadership Studies: Leading in Diverse and Global Environments (3 hours)
This course will explore leading in both diverse and global environments. Students will gain an appreciation for the importance of understanding global diversity, experiences, and viewpoints. This course looks at the many issues involved in leading in these dynamic contexts by examining concepts such as race, ethnicity, sexual orientation, gender, identity, prejudice and privilege, worldviews, culture, the roles of government, legal formalities, and foreign language acquisition. Upon completion of this course, students will understand issues of intercultural leadership and communication and build their capacities and skills for leading in diverse and global contexts. Attention will also be given to dimensions of cross-cultural interactions in organizational behavior. Taught in Bregenz (Austria) by Dr. Jeffrey Zimmerman.

LEAD 475 Leadership Studies: KIIS Leadership Practicum (Internship - 3 hours)
(Graduate students & Undergraduate seniors only)
The Assistant to the Program Director Internship enables students to shadow a summer or winter KIIS program director. In consultation with the KIIS office and KIIS director, the student creates a personalized work plan outlining the duties and responsibilities to be performed. Previous interns have assisted with residence life duties, accounting and administration, orientation, risk management, and communication between students & faculty. Interns apply for a specific KIIS program and receive a $300 scholarship. Contact Dr. John Dizgun for details.

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Management
MGT 303 International Business (3 hours)
The goal of this course is to train future U.S. business managers to understand the differences in cultures, economic systems, and business practices in the global marketplace. This course will focus on the fundamentals of international business, particularly in planning, organizing, and control aspects of the multinational enterprises. Roles of government, culture, foreign currency, taxes, political risk, and legal formalities for small and large firms entering new markets are emphasized. Comprehensive discussions and analysis of international business will be facilitated in the environment where international businesses compete. The course will also focus on a number of timely international issues and developments, such as the formation of the European Union (EU), the recent expansion of the EU, and the strategic role of Austria in the EU. Taught in Austria by Dr. Kevin Zhao.

MGT 303 International Business: Challenges of Global Competition (3 hours)
Features include forces in all business environments including, but not limited to: culture, technology, natural resources, environmental sustainability, economic/socioeconomic forces, political implications, along with legal, financial, and labor issues. Rapid changes due to technology will be discussed and students will be immersed in a global business simulator where each will put theories into practice. Students will develop an international business resume to assist entering into international careers. Specifically, the course will focus on: (a) reasons companies engage in international operations, (b) environmental factors that affect international operations, (c) strategies within a global context, (d) cutting edge issues in international business, and (e) various entry strategies into global markets. Taught in Spain-May by Prof. Kevin Parrett.

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Modern Languages (see also Chinese, German, French, Japanese, Italian, Spanish)
MLNG 410 Second Language Acquisition: L2 Learning & Study Abroad (3 hours)
Many language students travel each year to Costa Rica to acquire Spanish or to improve their current Spanish proficiency with little to no understanding of how second language learning works, particularly in a naturalistic setting such as Study Abroad. This is an introductory course to second language learning with particular emphasis on how to improve language and culture learning before, during and after a study abroad experience. Therefore, the two primary goals of the course are 1) to help students understand the complex process of learning another language including cultural aspects, and 2) to equip students with concrete skills and strategies to maximize their language learning while in Costa Rica and after they return home. Taught in Costa Rica by Dr. Genny Ballard.

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Music
MUS 200 Music Theory III (3 hours)
The course addresses: modulation; chromatic harmony and harmonic practice of the 19th century into the 20th century; introduction to non-tonal practice, serialism, extended tertian harmonies; analytical methods, and requisite aural skills. Emphasis is placed on dictation and analysis, and techniques for contextual analysis of challenging passages taken from the repertoire. Taught in Salzburg by Prof. Lindsay Clavere.

MUS 326 History of Music I (3 hours)
This course traces the path of Western music history and literature from antiquity into the late Baroque period. Included in the course are the primary biographical facts for composers, a review of their works and repertoire, the development of new genres, and the social/historical circumstances of each era. Taught in Salzburg by Dr. Bernardo Scarambone.

MUS 327 History of Music II (3 hours)
This course focuses on the major composers and important performance trends from the Classical period through the present day The student cultivates an awareness of the social, historical and philosophical ideas that influences those musical styles, and studies the repertoire of these periods through readings, lectures, discussions, analysis and score study. Taught in Salzburg by Prof. Peter Simpson.

MUS 338 Directed Study: Form and Analysis (3 hours)
Form and Analysis develops aural and written skills for analyzing how structural functions delineate musical form. The courses introduce structural functions in the context of short examples and apply these to understanding classical forms: binary, ternary, sonata, rondo, variation, imitative forms and their application in 19th and 20th century music. Emphasis is placed on contextual listening and connecting intuitive perceptions with an analytical framework that develops the student's ability to hear and write effectively about musical structure. Taught in Salzburg by Dr. Zachary Lopes.

MUS 338 Directed Study: Instrumental & Choral Conducting (3 hours)
Instrumental and Choral conducting develops the conducting technique of the musician through analysis and score study, individual and group exercises, study of conduction drills, individual works and excerpts, individual "podium" time for conducting and rehearsing, and self-evaluation of videotaped exercises. The student works toward the refinement of controlled 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 patterns and their subdivisions, the polishing of basic techniques including preparations, cut-offs, cues, fermate, dynamics, articulations, changes of tempo, irregular meters and expressive gesture. Emphasis is placed on the continued development of left hand techniques for dynamics, cues and phrases. In addition, the student fosters the development of score study and preparation skills, ear training and evaluation skills and the development of rehearsal technique and organization. Taught in Salzburg by Prof. Scot Buzza.

MUS 338 Directed Study: Mozart by Mozart - A Survey of Mozart's Letters (3 hours)
This fun and informative course will focus on the famous collection of letters Mozart wrote throughout his life. In those letters, Mozart revealed his humor, suffering, joy, and above all, his love for music. Throughout the course, students will unveil the human side of Mozart, study the music mentioned in his letters, be introduced to the people and places that shaped one of the most important composers of Western Music. Students will develop a better understanding of the music and life of Europe during the Classical period. Taught in Salzburg by Dr. Bernardo Scarambone.

MUS 338 Directed Study: Interpreting Western Instrumental Classical Music (3 hours)
This course will address the musical logic behind successful interpretations of written music as well as the idea of musical sound as metaphor for emotion and motion. Finally, the course will connect these concepts with a pedagogy of musical practicing that leads more efficiently to compelling rendering of classical instrumental music. Taught in Salzburg by Prof. Peter Simpson.

MUS 430 Music Literature: Piano Literature and the Classical Sonata Form (3 hours)
The sonata form is the quintessential compilation of smaller forms into an artistic container where expression and musical rhetoric unfolded. This course will offer students an in-depth study of the keyboard sonatas with special attention given to Mozart and Haydn through an historical lens, score analysis, and performance. Students will analyze the keyboard sonatas of Mozart and Haydn from a theoretical perspective, investigating their respective stylistic implications in performance. The final project will consist of performing selections from these works in a public performance, an analysis of a complete score, and a final analytical paper. Taught in Salzburg by Dr. Javier Clavere.

MUS 430 Music Literature: The Rise of the Soloist - Mozart and the Concerto (3 hours)
The concertos of Mozart are some of the most performed concertos today, many remaining staples in the repertoire of piano, string, and wind instruments. Mozart propelled the concerto to new heights and arguably codified the genre utilized and revered by countless composers. Through a survey of various Mozart concertos, students will study concerto form and its origins, Mozart's development as a concerto composer, and the influence of these great works on later composers. Study of the repertoire will include readings, lectures and discussions, score study, recordings, concert attendance, and expeditions around Salzburg. Taught in Salzburg by Dr. Zachary Lopes.

* KIIS Salzburg Choral Ensemble (no credit)
Singers and instrumentalists will have the opportunity for public performances of choral repertoire in order to supplement material covered in the Conducting class, as well as in Orchestral and Choral Literature. In this extra-curricular ensemble appropriate works are chosen, studied, rehearsed and performed in several Austrian concert venues. Taught in Salzburg by multiple faculty members.

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Political Science
PS 362 Latin American Government and Politics (3 hours) Graduate credit available
This course is a survey of politics and development in Latin America, with a focus on the 20th and 21st centuries. History matters so we will begin by reviewing how their colonial legacies influence where these countries are today. One of the primary goals for Latin America has been to develop so we will look at this concept not only in terms of political development, but also how it intertwines with economic and social development. The governments in the region have experimented with a number of different political and economic regime types and we will study such themes as democracy, corporatism, populism, military juntas, bureaucratic authoritarianism, capitalism, neoliberalism, and socialism. We will take advantage of our location to incorporate Chilean people and places into our coursework. Taught in Chile by Dr. Shawn Schulenberg.

PS 460 Topics: Military Rule and Its Legacy (3 hours) Graduate credit available
This course examines the relationship between the armed forces and society, with a focus in the southern cone countries of Argentina, Brazil, and Chile. Being in Chile presents a unique opportunity for this course as more than 5,000 people are estimated to have disappeared during the Pinochet dictatorship (1973-90). Within this context, we will ask a number of questions. First, why do militaries overthrow civilian leaders? Isn't it their job to protect? Second, what do militaries do when they are in power? Do they produce different types of policies? Third, why do militaries ultimately leave power? If they have the guns, why do they exit? Finally, what difficulties arise when civilians try to hold military leaders accountable for war crimes committed during their tenure? Taught in Chile by Dr. Shawn Schulenberg.

PS 450 Topics: Politics of China (3 hours)
This course is designed to introduce students to the Chinese political system and process as well as foreign relations. We start our discussion with China's traditional imperial system and its collapse, the rise of the communist movement, the establishment of PRC, and the economic reform and open-door policy. Then, we move to the topics including China's political institutions and processes, political challenges and transitions, political economy, and foreign relations. Taught in China by Dr. Choong-Nam Kang.

PS 460 Topics: US-East Asian Relations (3 hours)
This course will examine international relations between the US and East Asian countries, including China (and Taiwan), South and North Korea, and Japan. The main focus of this course will be more on current security and economic issues in this region since World War II, although we will also briefly discuss the historical background necessary to understand current events within the region. More specifically, this course will deal with China's emergence as a great power and its impact on regional and global stability, the North Korean nuclear issue, Japanese military buildup and its territorial disputes with neighboring countries, the prospect and implications of Korean reunification, economic interdependence and cooperation in this region, and implications of these issues for US foreign policies toward this region. Taught in China by Dr. Choong-Nam Kang.

PS 450 Topics: European Union: Transnational France? (3 hours)
From World Wars to Continental Union, Europe has transformed itself. In this context, the building of the European Union is, socially, economically, and politically, a unique experiment. It ultimately aims at overcoming state sovereignty in the name of a supranational, multi---state, multi---cultural, multi---lingual institution. As a founding member, and one of the pillars of the EU, France will serve as our central point of reference for the analysis of the evolution of the EU and its implications for French society, in particular, and to the Old Continent, at large. Taught in Paris I by Dr. Guilherme Silva.

PS 460 Topics: Visual Politics (3 hours)
The local, the national, the international, and the global: politics manifests itself at and from all these spatial and analytical levels. We will look at France as a case study for the analysis of key political concepts and how individuals and social groups interpret and appropriate them. We will critically assess how concepts such as society, class relations, the global and the local, nationalism, democracy, repression, immigration, globalization and cultural identity, among others, emerge through images of people and institutions in their daily lives. Students will explore landmark and mundane places, mingle with locals and foreigners alike, take photographs and make videos. Individually and as a group we will debate the political values of their captured images in search of coherent portraits of contemporary politics. Taught in Paris I by Dr. Guilherme Silva.

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Psychology
PSY 299 Topics: Nonverbal Behavior (3 hours) Graduate credit available
This course will focus on the many varieties and functions of human nonverbal behavior. It is very similar to the course I taught in 2013. Based on my experience and student comments, the 2015 course will include more class activities designed to illustrate concepts (and less lecture). Students will learn to look at humans in terms of what they do, rather than what they say, and become aware of distinctively human characteristics such as artifact creation, art, and architecture. Students will be introduced to the variety of technological and artifactual creations by humans through visits to museums in Paris, including the Louvre, Musee Picasso, Musee Cluny, and Musee du quai Branly. Our primate heritage will also be discussed following a visit to the Zoo de Vincennes (assuming it reopens in time). Attention will be drawn to the varieties of human experience through, for example, observations and explorations of people at cafes and parks, interactions between people and their pets, and examination of grave stones and grave goods left at Paris cemeteries. Students will observe interpersonal behaviors at the Jardin du Luxembourg, in the Metro, and at marketplaces, and study architecture as communication at various sites including La Defense, Sainte Chapelle, and the Pere-Lachaise Cemetery. Students will compare their own behavior with that of Parisian people and other American students. Taught in Paris I by Dr. Bob Brubaker.

PSY 299 Topics: Psychology of Art (3 hours)Graduate credit available
This course is a slightly revised version of the course I taught in 2013. The revisions are based on my previous KIIS experience and the feedback I received from my students. The course will explore selected topics in the psychology of art within the context of mid-19th to mid-20th century French painting. Psychopathology and art will be examined primarily through the study of Van Gogh and Maurice Utrillo. Creativity and the artistic personality will be examined primarily through the work of Picasso, Toulouse-Lautrec, Valadon, and Modigliani. Social psychology will be considered by looking at the early Impressionist painters and the role that group interaction played in supporting a major conceptual shift in painting. We will also discuss the art of the mentally ill and the role of art in psychotherapy. Taught in Paris I by Dr. Bob Brubaker.

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Public Health
HCA 347 International Health: Comparative Health Systems (3 hours)
This course examines both global health issues and health systems from a comparative perspective. This course will begin by discussing global health themes, including: international health organizations, right to health, access to medicines, significant international health issues, women's health, children's health, and the environment and health. We will define "health systems" and explore what they do and how they have evolved. We will focus on understanding the configuration of health systems, examining different frameworks for healthcare delivery, financing, coverage, and allocation of resources. Students will also learn about select health care systems around the globe and review the structure and functioning of their health systems. Country-level debates on issues such as access to care and funding will be explored as well as how a country's history has influenced the development of its health system. Taught in Tanzania by Dr. Monika Sawhney.

HCA 459 / HCA 459G Global Health Service-Learning Practicum (3-6 hours) Graduate credit available
The Global Health Service-Learning (GHSL) practicum opens doors for both undergraduate and graduate students in health professions such as medicine, nursing, nutrition, social work, and health administration to apply their skills alongside their Tanzanian counterparts while serving the health needs of the community. Key populations targeted by the program include the youth, HIV/AIDS patients, orphans, and a university community. The GHSL practicum can also be taken as an internship for students in health-related majors. Taught in Tanzania by Dr. William Mkanta.

PH 469 Critical Issues: Maternal and Child Health (3 hours) Graduate credit available
The course will introduce students to the main concepts of the public health field and the critical links between global health and social and economic development. Students will get an overview of the determinants of health, and how health status is measured, and students will also review the burden of disease, risk factors, and key measures to address the burden of disease in cost-effective ways. The course will cover key concepts and frameworks that are very practical in orientation. The course will be global in coverage but with an important focus on the developing world and on the health of the poor. Taught in Tanzania by Dr. Monika Sawhney.

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Religious Studies
RELS 399 Study Abroad: Greek Myth in Context (3 hours) Honors credit available
No stories contain greater richness and depth and none have been more influential than those we call "Greek myths." In this class students learn important ancient Greek tales while visiting sites in which many of these myths are said to have taken place—Athens, Eleusis, Delos, Delphi, Argos, and Mycenae. Meanwhile, students learn to read these tales as represented in Greek art—on vases and in sculpture that we view. Note: any student with a 3.2 GPA or above can enroll in this course for Honors credit. Students enrolled for Honors credit will have more challenging and unconventional assignments that will require greater analytical, creative, and critical thinking skills. Taught in Greece by Dr. Richard King.

RELS 308 East Asian Religious Traditions (3 hours)
This interdisciplinary seminar will investigate the cultural and religious development of several East Asian Sacred ways. The seminar will look centrally at Buddhism, Taoism, Shinto and some folk varieties of religious practice. Examination of primary sources such as selected Buddhist scriptures, the Tao Te Ching, and selections from Japanese epics. We will also read from secondary scholarship to help understand the historical development of these Asian sacred ways as well as how they continue to evolve and adapt with global network culture. We will also explore how current forms of religious expression are lived out and practiced in China, Japan and other East Asian nations.Taught in Japan by Dr. Steve Watkins.

RELS 399 Study Abroad: Shinto in Japanese Life (3 hours)
This interdisciplinary seminar explores the ancient roots of Shinto and the historical development of this sacred Japanese way of life through the centuries. We will read selections from the traditional Japanese epics, The Nihongi and The Kojiki. Additionally, we will read from secondary sources on Japanese life and culture. We will also explore how parallel Japanese religious practices, such as Zen Buddhism, have blended with some other more traditional folk forms Japanese religion. As we travel, students will be encouraged to make connections between architectural, cultural, literary, and artistic aspects of Japanese religion and current life. Taught in Japan by Dr. Steve Watkins.

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Sociology
SOCL 470 Environmental Sociology (3 hours)
The social and environmental impacts of the globalization of Mexico's political and economic systems are the focus of this course. The globalization of Mexico's labor force is considered through an examination of the maquiladora industry and transnational motherhood. The small Mexican farmer is the case study for examining the social and environmental costs of transnational agreements and multinational corporations. Taught in Merida, Mexico by Dr. Kimberly Pitts.

SOCL 489 Sociology Study Abroad: Gender in Latin America (3 hours)
The social construction of gender is explored through an analysis of the role of women in Mexico's political history. A survey of historical and modern figures is done through an examination of art, music, poetry, film, novels and scholarly articles focusing on women's active participation in politics with consideration to whether they have moved beyond the bad woman-good mother archetypes. Taught in Merida, Mexico by Dr. Kimberly Pitts.

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Spanish
SPAN 210 Intermediate Spanish Conversation Abroad (3 hours)
Reviews and reinforces the basic fundamentals of Spanish language mechanics from earlier levels, such as agreement, spelling, and punctuation. Students are asked to write a series of short compositions that reinforce grammar covered in the course and describe the experiences they are having in Costa Rica. In addition to writing mechanics, much attention is given to increasing Spanish vocabulary and strategies for doing so. As we will be in Costa Rica, this course also addresses what makes Costa Rican Spanish different from other Spanish dialects. The course is intended for a student with one year of college Spanish or equivalent. Taught in Spanish in Costa Rica by Prof. Maria Lopez.

SPAN 211 Intermediate Spanish Culture Abroad (3 hours)
This course focuses on the contemporary cultural character of Costa Rica and is designed to increase linguistic proficiency. Students develop an appreciation for different aspects of Spanish-speaking countries and their peoples and cultures. Traditional class work will be combined with planned excursions to cultural centers. The course is intended for a student with one year of college Spanish or equivalent. Taught in Spanish in Costa Rica by Prof. Maria Lopez.

SPAN 306 Experiencing Spanish Abroad: Envisioning Modern Cuba (3 hours)
This course orients students to modern Cuba by way of readings and discussions relating to such cultural topics as slavery, the sugar industry, the Revolution of 1959, the U.S. trade embargo, and others. Tentative field trips include the Museum of the Revolution, the Museum of the Literacy Campaign, Old Havana, the Fort of Havana, and a functioning ingenio (sugar mill). Students are expected to choose an area of cultural interest and conduct interviews with local Cubans to gather information for a final 5-minute presentation in Spanish. Taught in Spanish in Cuba by Dr. Ric Morris.

SPAN 370 Spanish Conversation (3 hours)
Through the study of Cuban legends written in Spanish, students will improve their Spanish communicative skills while familiarizing themselves with a vibrant Cuban history, folklore, culture, daily life, and language. Students will seek to meet local people and collect additional legends for the class anthology. This class will inspire students to practice creative and expository writing and the art of storytelling in Spanish. Taught in Spanish in Cuba by Prof. Irene Encarnacion.

SPAN 376 Literature and Culture of Latin America (3 hours)
This course will enhance students' literary, historical, social and cultural knowledge of the different Latin American, Hispanic/Latino groups in the United States. Traveling journals of conquistadores, mestizo memoirs, and later an extensive press, all written in Spanish inside the United States territory, will make evident that works in Spanish have always been with us. In order to better understand the themes and voices of the Latino literature, students will read, discuss, dramatize and recite a wide-ranging selection of works written in Spanish. Taught in Spanish in Cuba by Prof. Irene Encarnacion.

SPAN 372 Latin American Civilization and Culture (3 hours)
This course is a survey of the historical and cultural background of Latin America and its people from the Discovery to the present. However this class will center in the indigenous influence in Latin American countries, particularly the Mayan cultural heritage in south of Mexico and Central America. Taught in Spanish in Merida, Mexico by Dr. Itza Zavala-Garrett.

SPAN 455 Topics: Bilingualism in the Hispanic World - Mexico (3 hours)
This course will explore bilingualism in Hispanic America with particular emphasis on México (e.g. bilingualism Spanish-Mayan). Class discussions will discuss the linguistics and social aspects of bilingualism (e.g. language, power, and identity) as well as, issues related to language policies and education. We will also compare the phenomena of bilingualism in the context of Hispanic America and in the context of the United States. Linguistic data analysis and/or linguistic interviews will be part of a final project. It is expected, being a place of constant language contact (e.g., Spanish and Maya) that students take advantage of what Yucatán has to offer and its people as we read and discuss about bilingualism in Hispanic America. Taught in Spanish in Merida, Mexico by Dr. Alexandra Morales Reyes.

SPAN 470 Advanced Oral Spanish: Phonology and Pronunciation (3 hours)
This is an intermediate/advanced Spanish Conversation. Particular emphasis is given to phonology and pronunciation. Through practical usage and conversation related to everyday life in the region, students will gain significant practice with native-like pronunciation of Spanish. In this course students will examine the sound patterns of Spanish, by making recordings of themselves, their host families, and other locals, transcribe them, and analyze them. Students utilize local areas for conversation and exchange with local peoples and reinforce pronunciation, as well as, fundamentals of grammar, syntax, and formal and informal expression. Taught in Spanish in Merida, Mexico by Dr. Alexandra Morales Reyes.

SPAN 105 Introduction to Hispanic Culture (3 hours)
Survey of the contemporary values of Spain and Latin America, with emphasis on values, behavioral characteristics, social and political structures, and achievements of the Spanish-speaking peoples. Taught in English in Spain-May by Prof. Ninfa Floyd.

SPAN 306 Experiencing Spanish Abroad: Spanish Theatre (3 hours)
This course introduces students to Spain's wondrous short theatrical farces. Short plays will present key issues on character types, social issues, and themes akin to Spain's "Golden Age" of literature. Expect stage readings, improvisations, and theatre games. Students will learn vocabulary, language, and self-confidence through public speaking and performance. Taught in Spanish in Spain I by Dr. Nelson Lopez.

SPAN 306 Experiencing Spanish Abroad: Films of Modern Spain (3 hours)
In this course, students will become acquainted with the work of several important film directors from Spain, including Pedro Almodovar, Iciar Bollain, Benito Zambrano, and Fernando Leon de Aranoa. Students will also learn how film depicts key historical, cultural, social, political, and economic concerns of Spain in the twenty-first century. Taught in Spanish in Spain I by Dr. Kajsa Larson.

SPAN 370 Spanish Conversation (3 hours)
A course designed to practice and exercise pronunciation, comprehension and oral expression abroad. Emphasis is placed on bringing the student into contact with Spain's historical background and culture through interaction with native speakers and informal visits to places of interest such as shops, parks, monuments, and so forth. Taught in Spanish in Spain I by Dr. Kajsa Larson and Dr. Veronica Thacker.

SPAN 374: Literature and Culture of Spain: Literary Segovia (3 hours)
An introduction to the culture of Spain through the study of literary texts. The art of storytelling (Contar cuentos). The purpose is to learn about the culture of Spain through storytelling, anecdotes, interviews, and conversations recreated by writing and telling stories. By the end of the course, it is my desire that the students participate in either reading and/or re-enacting these short stories in a get together with the hosts in a relaxed atmosphere. Taught in Spanish in Spain I by Dr. Veronica Thacker.

SPAN 373 Spanish Civilization and Culture (3 hours)
Survey of historical and cultural background of Spain and its people from the Roman colonization to the present. The topics are organized around a series of themes including religion, history, politics, regionalism, demography, art and architecture. The course addresses the complex historical, political and cultural identities of Spain in order to understand the country in the twenty-first century. Taught in Spanish in Spain II by Dr. Melissa Stewart.

SPAN 455 Topics: Spanish Language in Context (3 hours)
In this pragmatics course, students will practice interpreting and engaging in speech acts (e.g., requests, apologies, greetings). We focus on the cultural and linguistic cues that enable us to go beyond literal meaning. Students collect, transcribe, and analyze data by interacting with native speakers (interviews & role plays), and we examine how politeness and (in)directness are manifested in speech acts. Taught in Spanish in Spain II by Dr. Lisa Kuriscak.

SPAN 455 Topics: Interpreting Spain's Space through Literature, Film, Music, and Art (3 hours)
The course will present students with a selection of literary (short stories, poetry, drama), art text (paintings) and film narratives (short films, movies, documentary) that present Spain a creative space to be deciphered. Taught in Spanish in Spain II by Dr. Inma Pertusa.

SPAN 470 Advanced Oral Spanish (3 hours)
This course aims to help students develop greater fluency, lexical expansion, grammatical accuracy, and better pronunciation by reading authentic texts, exploring the local community, interviewing host family members, and sharing written and oral reports of these experiences. Emphasis will be on vocabulary building, polishing grammar, and mastering oral communication tasks (e.g., narrating and describing, giving elaborate explanation, and supporting opinions). Taught in Spanish in Spain II by Dr. Lisa Kuriscak and Dr. Inma Pertusa.

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Theatre
THEA 375 Topics: Vixens and Virgins in Classical Greek Theatre (3 hours)
From the tragic heroine to the vengeful murderess, we will explore many of the dynamic female characters in ancient Greek text. Through discussion, writing and small group exercises, we will investigate how these sharply drawn characters have shaped popular culture and have influenced feminism and our own views of women in contemporary society. Taught in Greece by Dr. Deborah Martin.

THEA 375 Topics: Ancient Drama (3 hours)
Students will read, discuss, and write about the comedies and tragedies of classical Athens. We will discuss the dynamics of each play, and explore such questions as what makes people laugh, and what makes tragedy enjoyable and exciting. Site visits to ancient theaters will enhance students' understanding of early stagecraft. Taught in Greece by Dr. Deborah Martin.

THEA 375 Topics: Travelogue to Monologue (3 hours)
In this course we will explore the craft of travel writing as transformed into performance monologues. While the title of the course suggests acting, we will do very little performance and concentrate almost entirely on writing. However, students will read, or have someone else read, their work to the class. There may be no formal classroom for this course. Instead, we may use whatever found space we have to find our inspiration. Taught in Italy-Winter by Prof. Shan Ayers.

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