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 Courses are taught in English (except those listed under "Modern Languages").
 Courses are 3 credit hours each, unless noted.

Agriculture
AGEC 475 Topics in Agricultural Economics: Wine Business in Paris (3 hours)
Wine contributes over 100 billion dollars to the world economy and is the world's most important fruit crop. In no other city in the world is wine more exalted than Paris. Study the complex world of strategies in retail marketing through visits to some of the greatest wine shops, or cavistes. These merchants survive in the most competitive environment in the world and are the most creative in their window displays, product presentation, and sales. France's chefs and sommeliers have been regarded as the rightful repositories of wine knowledge. Students will view firsthand wine presentation and service at the hands of the masters in their elements at the great wine bars and restaurants. There is no way to understand wine or life better than to sit like Hemingway at Brasserie Lipp or Richard Olney at Au Sauvignon and contemplate the human spectacle over the world's greatest beverage. Taught in Paris I by Prof. Blake Layne.

AGRI 475/HORT 475 Topics in Agriculture: Wines of France: The Taste of Stars (3 hours)
Since the fall of the Roman Empire, no country has influenced the world of wine more than France. France's vineyards, grapes, wine and winemakers produce more diversity than the rest of the world combined! France is the birthplace of the idea that geography, or terroir, is fundamental in shaping the character and quality of the wine. A focus on the life of Louis Pasteur, the father of modern enology, and a visit to the Pasteur Institute will be among the highlights. When describing wine, to know the difference between framboise and frais des bois is like knowing the difference between the subtle and sublime. Taught in Paris I by Prof. Blake Layne.

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Anthropology/Archeology
ANTH 340 Peoples and Cultures of Latin America (3 hours)
This class will start with an overview of the diverse societies of Latin America from an anthropological perspective. It will explore cultural, economic, political and religious aspects of life in the region; urbanization and urban life; migration and transnationalism; indigenous peoples and their role in recent political transformations in the region. This class will then focus on Ecuador in particular. Specifically, it will review the archeological record of Ecuador and the transition from Paleo-Indians to the local origins of agriculture. Then the focus will be on anthropological studies of the major indigenous groups in the area. This class will conclude with discussions of the contemporary implications for Ecuador's indigenous social movement. Taught in Ecuador by Dr. Suzanne Strait.

ANTH 366-1 Topics in Anthropology: Archaeological Methods (3 hours)
This course introduces students to the concepts, goals, methods, and theories of the discipline of archaeology, with a focus on archaeological thinking skills. In addition to in-class (and out of class) data-based writing exercises, students will read The Life and Death of a Druid Prince, which analyses Lindow Man, a Celtic bog body from England. Students will also read Stealing History: Tomb Raiders, Smugglers, and the Looting of the Ancient World. This course will serve as a complement to the course on Viking Archaeology. Taught in Denmark by Dr. Kelli Carmean.

ANTH 366-2 Topics in Anthropology: Viking Archaeology (3 hours)
This course studies the Viking past through both archaeology and the sagas. Lectures will trace Viking development beginning with their expansion (as defined by the attack on Lindisfarne in 793), through the rise of early Christianity, until about 1100. The Far Traveler: Voyages of a Viking Woman as well as The Historical Atlas of the Vikings will be our textbooks. Visits to archaeological sites and museums, and subsequent writing responses by students, will form an important part of this course. Taught in Denmark by Dr. Kelli Carmean.

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Asian Religions and Culture
ARC 401/RELS 399-8 Topics in Asian Religions and Cultures: Religion in Japanese Literature (3 hours)
This course offers an introduction to traditional Japanese religious culture as expressed, appropriated, and adapted by Japanese authors from antiquity to the present. Through analysis of diaries, dramas, novels, poems, and short stories (in English translation), students will develop a basic understanding of Japanese religious ideas, institutions, and practices. To the extent permitted by the circumstances of the program, works of cinema and live theatrical performances also will inform learning in the course. Taught in Japan by Dr. Jeffrey Richey.

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Art/Art History
ART 106 History of Art since 1300 (3 hours)
A selective chronological study of the major visual arts from Gothic through modern times. Taught exclusively on sites (churches, museums, galleries, etc.), the course surveys art of the Western tradition. Emphasis is placed on understanding art within a particular historical and social context, giving students a sense of the history of ideas as well as their visual expression. Taught in Prague by Dr. Zbynek "ZB" Smetana.

ART 140 Drawing I (3 hours)
Japan is one of the most highly designed and aesthetically cultivated of all countries. The potential for drawing subjects ranges from landscape/garden and architecture to objects and even packaging. Drawing I is based on learning the basic skills of drawing from observation, starting with line and linear perspective, progressing to value and texture so as to show objects in space and illuminated. Students also learn compositional principles of design and will draw in class and on-site. As this is an introductory level course, students do not have to be art students or have any background in art.
Taught in Japan by Prof. Sarah Gutwirth.

ART 340 Drawing III: Landscape Drawing (3 hours)
Students will work on-site, in natural and man-made environments, utilizing the materials of charcoal, ink and oil pastels. A variety of landscapes and cityscapes will be introduced, taking in the natural beauty of our surroundings. Subject matter may include animal and plant studies. Students will learn the extensive uses of charcoal, ink, and oil pastels within the elements and principles of design to create successful landscape images. Students will keep a sketchbook and create a visual diary containing drawings, studies and written texts that document their experiences in the KIIS program. After completion of the summer program, students will hold an art exhibition at the West Kentucky Community and Technical College, Clemens Gallery, in the Fall of 2014 based on the images and on-site drawings from the course.
Taught in Italy by Prof. Randy Simmons.

ART 401 Art of the Italian Renaissance (3 hours)
A survey of Italian Renaissance art and culture from the late fifteenth century through the end of the sixteenth century (c. 1475-1600). Our attention centers on Florence and Rome, though other cities and regions are also considered. In lectures and discussions we examine the cultural "rebirth" that defines the period, the activities of individual artistic personalities, aspects of social life that affected art production and reception, and artistic styles and techniques. Among the artists we study are Michelangelo, Leonardo, and Raphael. Required readings include modern historical studies and primary Renaissance sources. Most classes will be held outside the classroom in the presence of artistic monuments. Through class meetings, discussions and test preparation, students will develop critical thinking skills. Taught in Italy by Dr. Christopher Fulton.

ART 490 Topics: Museum Exhibition & Display (3 hours) Graduate credit available
The course overviews various aspects of museum exhibition and display practices, comparing historic to contemporary, German to American, high to low culture in venues focusing on art, history, popular culture, architecture, fashion, film and many others. The class will visit Berlin's cultural institutions and deconstruct the strategies and meanings implicit in current museum display. A basic theoretical textbook such as Exhibiting Cultures: The Poetics and Politics of Museum Display, by Ivan Karp and Steven Lavine will serve as a baseline for discussions, case studies, and class exercises.
Taught in Berlin by Prof. John Begley.

ART 491 Topics: Museums, Nationalism & Modern Art (3 hours)
This course uses the museums of Barcelona as its classroom. Barcelona boasts some of the most innovative museums in Europe, with a particular emphasis on modern art and culture. Catalan identity is celebrated within these collections and deliberately crafted to present a modern, cosmopolitan, and independent city and region. Designed as a museum studies course, the class focuses on curatorial decision-making, which includes issues of exhibition design and layout, collections management, marketing, museum education, and accessibility. Classes include museum and art center visits, as well as walking tours of the city. Taught in Barcelona by Dr. Eileen McKiernan-Gonzalez.

ART 491-2 Topics: Contemporary Arts Practice (3 hours) Graduate credit available
The course will examine contemporary art studio practice both through theoretical and critical readings and observation of Berlin's contemporary art scene, its museums, galleries and independent artist studios. It will investigate the framework and relationships that support today's collective, interdisciplinary art making practice. This course will sharpen a student's individual artistic practices through direct engagement with a wide range of creative strategies for the production of art. It will introduce knowledge of the current discourse in various contemporary art forms, provide a comparative context to view of their own work, and stimulate impetus to grow and expand their own creative practice. A variety of media, from drawing, painting, collage/assemblage, performance and installation to photography and video will be used to prompt and capture this development. Taught in Berlin by Prof. John Begley.

ART 491-3 Topics: Classical Mythology in Art and Literature (3 hours)
The Romans borrowed and often reinterpreted the stories from Greek myth in their literature, sculptures and paintings. Renaissance and Baroque artists loved to add their own twists to the loves and adventures of the gods and heroes. Students read selections from Homer, Hesiod, Ovid, and other ancient texts in English translations to understand the visual representations of myth in the Greek vases, Roman sculpture and paintings, and the Renaissance and Baroque masterpieces they study in Italy. Taught in Italy by Dr. Jim Murley.

ART 491-4 Topics: Day to Day in Ancient Italy (3 hours)
How did the people of ancient Italy commemorate birth, marriage, and death? Why did they have so many gods and how did they worship them? What did the Romans eat? What were their means of entertainment? How did they dress? In this course, students discover that art and archaeology offer the answers. Sculptures, paintings, and grave gifts are windows into world of the fascinating Etruscans. In Rome, students "think away" the present cityscape to view the monuments, infrastructure, and architecture of the Roman Republic and Empire. In visits to famous antiquity collections, students learn how the material culture reveals the ordinary lives of Etruscans and Romans. Taught in Italy by Dr. Jim Murley.

ART 491-5/IDFM 423 Topics: Italian Design (3 hours)
If the Italians did not invent design, then it is a wonder as to who else could have possessed the creative resources to do so. This course draws upon the rich and variegated Italian environment to study several forms of design: graphic, interior, fashion, industrial, architectural, packaging, furniture and advertising. Field trips give students direct experience of design and illuminate the principles behind historical and modern design practices. Visiting design studios, retail shops, architectural sites and other venues will be an invaluable experience for anyone in the field of art, design, architecture or advertising. Taught in Italy by Prof. Mary Grassell.

ART 491-6/JOUR 481 Topics: New Media Publishing (3 hours)
From the historic study of the printed word to contemporary digital publishing technologies, this course will traverse words, visuals and kinetics in storytelling with a hands-on investigation of new media publishing. Students will use their Italian field experiences as content for a new media publication and then push that content to print. Media production, brand building, and design problem-solving practiced through this course transfers equally well to journalism, creative writing, graphic design and the humanities. Taught in Italy by Prof. Christine Ingersoll.

ART 491-7 Topics: Travel Journal for Art Students (3 hours)
Japan has loomed large in the imagination of many artists, from the Impressionist fascination with prints to contemporary interest in anime and film. The culture is full of visual richness that could inspire students seeking to work in various art media. Artists like Turner and Delacroix travelled and made sketches they later used in their studios to turn into finished work. This course seeks art students who work in media difficult to carry with them (sculpture, printmaking) who want to collect images through drawing, watercolors and photos that they will use to make a future body of work. Students will spend time gathering imagery and write a proposal for finished work. Taught in Japan by Prof. Sarah Gutwirth.

ART 491-8 Topics: Individual Topics in the History of Art (3 hours) Graduate credit available
An independent course in art history for advanced, self-directed undergraduate and graduate students majoring in art, art history, or architecture. Students will participate in the ART 106 instructional activities. Each student must submit and receive prior approval of their study plan. Prerequisite/Co-requisite: ART 106 or equivalent and the consent of Dr. Smetana. Taught in Prague by Dr. Zbynek "ZB" Smetana.

ART 496-1 Topics: Social Media Narrative (3 hours)
Create a 21st century travel journal through image and writing via social media. Students will conduct interviews with themselves and possibly with others documenting their thoughts and experiences. These experiences, poems, fragments of thought, images and video will then be posted to either a blog, Facebook, and Twitter. The visual and written narrative experience of losing oneself and finding oneself with regard to the foreign is a possible theme. Smartphone or camera is required. During the class we will discuss current thought about "travel writing", and investigate the notions of identity, fantasy and place. No prior art or creative writing background required. Taught in Barcelona by Prof. Doreen Maloney.

ART 496-2 Topics: Street Scenes - Digital Photo and Video (3 hours)
Investigate Barcelona's famous streets, its culture of outdoor street dance, cafes, people and architecture with the lens of a camera. Students will use small digital cameras or their phones to shoot both still images and video to create a portfolio of images that transcend the snapshot. Student will shoot and critique images daily. No art background is required. The basics of composition and design elements will be taught and explored via the photographic image.
Taught in Barcelona by Prof. Doreen Maloney.

ART 496-3 Topics: Digital Photography (3 hours)
Students will visit places of interest in the cities and countryside. They will learn how to use their digital SLR cameras and use their own imaging software, preferably Adobe Photoshop, to enhance their photographic images. Students enrolled in this course will need to bring a laptop equipped with imaging software. After completion of the summer program, students will hold an art exhibition at the West Kentucky Community and Technical College, Clemens Gallery, in the Fall of 2014 based on the images from the course. Taught in Italy by Prof. Randy Simmons.

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Biology
BIOL 280/GEOG 280 Introduction to Environmental Science: Argentina from the Andes to Buenos Aires (3 hours)
Argentina is a land of contrasts from the uninhabitable high Andes to the bustling port of Buenos Aires, the second largest metropolitan area in South America. The country's population has increased five-fold in the past century, bringing with it prosperity and a host of environmental impacts. This course will examine the natural resources of Argentina and the history and present condition of environmental impacts. Students will gain an understanding of how science informs and helps provide solutions toward environmental problems. Trips to cultural locations and events, public works, agricultural areas, and wild habitats will present opportunities to evaluate practices and consider lower impact alternatives. Through immersion in Argentina's natural and constructed environments students will confront global environmental issues of the 21st century. Taught in Argentina by Dr. Bruce Schulte.

BIOL 326 Ornithology (3 hours)
A study of the general characteristics, economic importance, history, structure, classification and identification of birds. This class will visit biological preserves in both the Amazon Basin as well as the cloud forest highlands northwest of the city Quito. Both locales possess some of the greatest ornithological diversity of any bird habitat in the world. The class will conclude in the Galapagos with an examination of threatened bird habitats on this remote volcanic archipelago.
Taught in Ecuador by Dr. Malcolm Frisbie.

BIOL 334 Animal Behavior in Argentina (3 hours)
Animal behavior involves the scientific study of the cause, development, evolution and function of the way animals respond to stimuli. Argentina provides a very stimulating environment in which to explore the field of behavior. Wild animals living in urban landscapes have a variety of challenges, often quite new in their evolutionary history. Domestic animals have undergone selective breeding to improve their suitability for human built environments. In natural ecosystems, typical biotic and abiotic selective forces as well as anthropogenic agents influence animal behavior. The course will examine some major themes in animal behavior and incorporate a conservation behavior perspective as the class travels to metropolitan, rural and wild habitats. Taught in Argentina by Dr. Bruce Schulte.

BIOL 430 Evolution: Theory and Process (3 hours) Graduate credit available
Evolution is the foundational idea which unites all sub-disciplines of biology. It is also the central principle in biology which ties that science to the other sciences including astronomy, chemistry, geology, and physics. This course traces the historical development of evolutionary thought and explores modern evolutionary theory. We will capitalize on the richness of tropical ecosystems by integrating the historical and modern observations and inferences made by others with our own observations in rain forest, cloud forest, inter-Andean Valley, tropical montane ecosystems and the Galapagos Islands, giving students the experience to witness a unique ecosystem that played a pivotal historical role in the development of evolutionary ideas. Taught in Ecuador by Dr. Malcolm Frisbie.

BIOL 485-1 Field Biology: Tropical Biodiversity and Conservation (3 hours) Graduate credit available
This course explores fundamental concepts in ecology including flow of energy in ecosystems, biogeochemical cycling, species interactions, and community structure. We will utilize the natural laboratory of Ecuador to explore diverse tropical ecosystems including Andean highlands, tropical intermontane valleys and tropical rainforests. Our encounters with the rich biodiversity of these tropical ecosystems will lead us naturally to consider problems of conservation in the face of contravening pressures such as human population growth, expansion of tourism (including ecotourism), and petroleum production. The course will conclude in the Galapagos Islands where students will be able to witness the conservation challenges these unique volcanic island ecosystems face. Taught in Ecuador by Dr. Suzanne Strait.

BIOL 485-2 Field Biology: Galapagos Islands: Beauty, Significance, & Challenge (1 hour) Graduate credit available
As we visit the famous volcanic islands situated 600 miles off Ecuador's coast in the Pacific Ocean, we will study their geologic origin and history, and explore their role in the development of evolutionary thought. We will visit several of their unique ecosystems including dry lowlands and the moister volcanic highlands, and snorkel in the rich surrounding waters. We will talk with Galapagos residents to gain a fuller understanding of the history of human occupation of the islands and the challenges ahead for preserving this fascinating archipelago. Team-taught in Ecuador by Dr. Malcolm Frisbie and by Dr. Suzanne Strait.

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Institution for Citizenship & Social Responsibility
ICSR 301-1/EDU 400-1/ENV 475 Seminar in Social Responsibility: Sustainability Education in Costa Rica: Lessons from a Leader (3 hours)
In this course, students will study the factors shaping Costa Rica's leadership in sustainability education by examining the historical, environmental, and political aspects that influence the country. Through these examinations, students will understand the complex nature to environmental problems that plague developing countries. By completing micro- and macro-field studies, students will work with community members and/or organizations to truly understand the unique place of Costa Rica. Student research will focus on examining the impacts of development on the environment and on society by understanding key historical and current aspects of sustainable development strategies in Costa Rica, coupled with knowledge of tropical ecosystem function and connectivity. Taught in Costa Rica by Dr. Kristin Cook.

ICSR 301-2 Mexico In the 21st Century: Culture, Development, & Politics (3 hours)
Deep in the heart of Mexican culture, there is ongoing debate about the value of the western, neo-liberal economic model that characterizes national development policies. More recently, indigenous groups have allied themselves to give voice to a traditional model of social and economic development that finds value in the multiplicity of languages and cultural traditions dating back to the origins of Mesoamerica. This course will engage the multiple perspectives towards human and economic development in Mexico, with special attention to the Zapatista movement. It is here that we will discover the "Mexico Profundo" development paradigm that values "another world" where there is room for everyone to live in dignity. (Students will have an opportunity to read texts in either Spanish or English.) Taught in Mexico by Dr. Marguerite Rivage-Seul.

ICSR 301-3/SOCL 489 Seminar in Social Responsibility: Sociology of Sustainability (3 hours)
The aim of this course is to cultivate 'ecological literacy'—a quality of mind that seeks out the connections among human and natural systems. The course demonstrates the inextricable interconnectedness of economic, political, social, and ecological systems. Students are encouraged to develop a critical, contextualized, and reflective attitude, as well as recognize the ramifications of personal decisions in the broader context of an ecological balance. The course is structured around the comparative perspective. We will contrast attitudes about sustainability in the United States, and the Czech Republic, and examine the cultural forces that shaped them. We explore aspects of the economic and political structure, specifically the context of EU regulations and directives that shape policy choices and impact sustainable outcomes.
Taught in Prague by Prof. Marketa Cawood.

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Chinese
CHIN 102 Elementary Chinese (3 hours)
Conversational Mandarin with basic grammar and basic functional vocabulary of the Chinese language. Includes aspects of contemporary Chinese culture. Taught in China by a Local Instructor.

CHIN 201 Intermediate Chinese (3 hours)
Conversational Mandarin with intermediate grammar and intermediate functional vocabulary of the Chinese language. Includes aspects of contemporary Chinese culture. Taught in China by a Local Instructor.

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Communication
COMM 263 Fundamentals of Communication and Culture (3 hours)
This course provides an overview of communication patterns as influenced by surrounding culture and how culture is created and sustained through communication. It focuses on American multicultural perspectives that impact social and business communication in today's world. Taught in Berlin by Dr. Stephen Underhill.

COMM 348 Interpersonal Communication (3 hours)
A focus on everyday conversation and interaction. Special focus on: CMM Theory, Constructivism, Relational Dialectics, Symbolic Interactionism, and Pragmatics, as well as the qualities of humane dialogue, relationship development and deterioration. Given Paris as a context for this course we would have an opportunity to add an intercultural perspective and an emphasis on the importance of adapting appropriately to cultural contexts to this study of interpersonal communication. Taught in Paris I by Dr. Gary LaFleur.

COMM 400 Topics in Communication: Berlin: Commemorative Places and Collective Memory (3 hours)
Berlin has many places that evoke powerful collective memories. The city has public memorials to its nine centuries of history, to Eastern bloc refugees, to acts of terror committed by Nazis, Communists, and their secret police forces, to the victims of such violence, as well as to those who resisted, subverted, and overthrew various oppressors. This course will examine (1) the monuments and memorials of Berlin and their historical origins, (2) how commemorative places in Berlin encourage particular memories that capture the imagination and produce attachments, and (3) how these places have created collective memory that withstand time to become compelling cultural forces. We will combine site visits to the Memorial to the Murdered Jews of Europe, the Jewish Museum Berlin, the Marienfelde Refugee Centre Memorial, and the Berlin-Hohenschohoausen Memorial with secondary source material about the selected memory places and interdisciplinary scholarship on collective memory. Taught in Berlin by Dr. Stephen Underhill.

COMM 463-1 Intercultural Communication (3 hours)
This course is designed to create an understanding of dimensions of communication theory that apply across cultural boundaries. Emphasis is placed on both theoretical and practical awareness of communication in and between cultures. Taught in Italy by Dr. Ann Andaloro.

COMM 463-2 Intercultural Communication (3 hours)
A focus on human communicative misunderstandings that are rooted in social behavior and culture. Paris will provide numerous opportunities to experience intercultural misunderstanding and culture shock, as well as opportunities to realize better intercultural understanding. Parisian social behavior is sufficiently dissimilar from American behavior, that the contrast will facilitate the learning of better intercultural skills. Taught in Paris I by Dr. Gary LaFleur.

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Economics
ECON 410-1 Seminar in Economics: Comparative Economic Systems (3 hours)
This course compares and analyzes the major economic systems of the world in theory and practice. The economic systems including capitalism, socialism, and mixed economy will be evaluated. The course provides students with an understanding of how economic systems work and how economic theory interacts with government policy, history, and culture in an attempt to explain economic performance. Country studies will include advanced market capitalist economies (e.g., the U.S., Japan, and France), former socialist economies, (e.g., the former Soviet Union countries), and East Asian economies (e.g., South Korea and China), Latin American economies (e.g., Cuba and Mexico) will be emphasized.
Taught in Cuba by Dr. Rod Erfani.

ECON 410-2 Seminar in Economics: Issues in the Global Economy (3 hours)
This course is intended to provide students with an introduction to theory and policy of international trade and finance, so they can better understand international economic relations. Selected international economic issues, policies, and problems will be examined. Topics of discussion will include patterns of trade, trade barriers, economic integration and trading blocs, international financial relations, and economic development. The impact of globalization on the socio-economic development in the developing countries will be explored. Current economic issues in Latin American countries such as economic development, regional economic integration, inflation, unemployment, poverty, and inequality will be emphasized.
Taught in Cuba by Dr. Rod Erfani.

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Education
EDU 400-1/ENV 475/ICSR 301-1 Investigations in Education: Sustainability Education in Costa Rica: Lessons from a Leader (3 hours)
In this course, students will study the factors shaping Costa Rica's leadership in sustainability education by examining the historical, environmental, and political aspects that influence the country. Through these examinations, students will understand the complex nature to environmental problems that plague developing countries. By completing micro- and macro-field studies, students will work with community members and/or organizations to truly understand the unique place of Costa Rica. Student research will focus on examining the impacts of development on the environment and on society by understanding key historical and current aspects of sustainable development strategies in Costa Rica, coupled with knowledge of tropical ecosystem function and connectivity. Taught in Costa Rica by Dr. Kristin Cook.

EDU 400-2/PH 469 Investigations in Education: Pura Vida: Costa Rica's Approach to Health & Wellness (3 hours)
The program is designed to increase students' appreciation of cultural influences within the framework of policies and practices impacting health and well-being, social justice and sustainable environmental, health and community development issues in Costa Rica. Topics will include the role of environmental policy and sustainable development in Costa Rica; Costa Rica's eco-tourism industry; the Costa Rican universal health care system and the rapidly emerging medical tourism industry; international human rights issues; and special government programs defending the rights of children and providing employment and English language training to youth. Learning activities will include presentations by national and international experts, tours of programs and facilities, roundtable discussions, student led presentations, cultural immersion, and visits to national parks. Taught in Costa Rica by Dr. Kristin Cook.

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English
ENG 396/RELS 399-2 Mythology: Greek Myth in Context (3 hours) Honors credit available
No stories contain greater richness and depth and none have been more influential than those we call "Greek myths." In this class students learn important ancient Greek tales while visiting sites in which many of these myths are said to have taken place—Athens, Eleusis, Delos, Delphi, Argos, and Mycenae. Meanwhile, students learn to read these tales as represented in Greek art—on vases and in sculpture that we view. Note: any student with a 3.2 GPA or above can enroll in this course for Honors credit. Students enrolled for Honors credit will have more challenging and unconventional assignments that will require greater analytical, creative, and critical thinking skills. Taught in Greece by Dr. Richard King.

ENG 399-1/THEA 375 Topics in English: Classical Greek Comedy (3 hours) Graduate or Honors credit available
After discussing Comedy as defined by Aristotle's Poetics, students compare and contrast the bawdy, satirical, chorus-based Old Comedy of 5th century BC Greece with the realistic, moralistic, character-based New Comedy of the 4th century BC. While studying Aristophanes and Menander, students become acquainted with the evolution of style and content as connected to the writers' social and political environment, as well as their influence on contemporary comedy. Such themes as education, politics, war, families, mistaken identity, and love gained/lost/gained again are examined.
Taught in Greece by Dr. Paul Ranieri.

ENG 399-2 Topics in English: The Paris Moment: American Expatriate Writers & Modernism (3 hours)
This course will concentrate on the question of why so many foreign writers, particularly American ones, were drawn to Paris in the first third of the twentieth century. The course will begin with consideration of Paris's unique attributes as a breeding ground for modernist literary and artistic experimentation during this era, and subsequent literary readings will focus on American authors Gertrude Stein, Ernest Hemingway, F. Scott Fitzgerald, and James Baldwin. Readings will include fiction and nonfiction works as well as criticism, and students will be evaluated on their participation during class discussions and excursions, several short reading response papers, an independent research project culminating in a class presentation and formal paper, and a final exam. Taught in Paris I by Dr. Charlotte Rich.

ENG 399-3 Topics in English: Henry James and Edith Wharton in Paris (3 hours)
This course will explore how Paris intertwined with the lives and writings of these two writers in the late nineteenth century through the turn of the twentieth century. James spent a year in Paris during his early career, interacting with French writers including Flaubert, de Maupassant, and Zola. Wharton, a friend of James throughout her adult life, visited Paris yearly in her early marriage and after 1910 settled permanently there, performing relief work during World War I and befriending many French writers and intellectuals. These experiences directly influenced several of James' and Wharton's fiction and nonfiction works, which students will study along with taking excursions to visit relevant sites to these authors' lives. Students' immersion in French culture and language will also help them to analyze works of James and Wharton that contain untranslated French phrases and demand familiarity with French traditions. Taught in Paris I by Dr. Charlotte Rich.

ENG 399-4 Topics in English: 20th Century Czech Literature (3 hours)
The Czech Republic (especially Prague) has a rich and compelling literary tradition. This course will familiarize students with this tradition and will enable students to think about and understand the ways in which place and history shape artistic (specifically literary) expression. In short, students will learn about Czech literature and, more generally, how to situate literature within its historical and geographical context. Field trips and excursions into the city to explore sites directly tied to the authors and their texts will help students in this endeavor. Readings include Jan Neruda's short stories, Franz Kafka's Metamorphosis or The Trial, Jaroslav Hasek's The Good Soldier Svejk, Milan Kundera's The Unbearable Lightness of Being or The Joke, and Bahamel Hrabal's Closely Watched Trains. Students will write several short papers analyzing the intersection of place, time, and literature. The course will also require students to actively participate in discussion and take a final exam. Taught in Prague by Dr. Jeffrey Osborne.

ENG 399-5 Topics in English: Travel Writing and the Study Abroad Experience (3 hours)
Quite often, we tend to view a country or a city as a homogeneous place, quickly reducing it into a bite-size concept or perspective that we can easily digest in a unifying experience. One of the values of study abroad transcends seeking the Czech Republic experience in order to discover the truly diverse and complex components that make to think of their time in the Czech Republic as a set of experiences, rather than one single homogenized experience. Using David Farley and Jessie Sholl's anthology, Travelers' Tales: Prague and the Czech Republic, as a collection of travel-writing models this course will ask students to translate their experiences into writing that aims to capture the complexity of place. Students will be required to write in several modes, choosing several of a long list of forms: poetry, the journal entry, the essay, photo-journalism, blogging, the short story, etc. Taught in Prague by Dr. Jeffrey Osborne.

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Environmental Science
ENV 475/EDU 400-1/ICSR 301-1 Topics in Environmental Science: Sustainability Education in Costa Rica: Lessons from a Leader (3 hours)
In this course, students will study the factors shaping Costa Rica's leadership in sustainability education by examining the historical, environmental, and political aspects that influence the country. Through these examinations, students will understand the complex nature to environmental problems that plague developing countries. By completing micro- and macro-field studies, students will work with community members and/or organizations to truly understand the unique place of Costa Rica. Student research will focus on examining the impacts of development on the environment and on society by understanding key historical and current aspects of sustainable development strategies in Costa Rica, coupled with knowledge of tropical ecosystem function and connectivity. Taught in Costa Rica by Dr. Kristin Cook.

GEOG 280/BIOL 280 Introduction to Environmental Science: Argentina from the Andes to Buenos Aires (3 hours)
Argentina is a land of contrasts from the uninhabitable high Andes to the bustling port of Buenos Aires, the second largest metropolitan area in South America. The country's population has increased five-fold in the past century, bringing with it prosperity and a host of environmental impacts. This course will examine the natural resources of Argentina and the history and present condition of environmental impacts. Students will gain an understanding of how science informs and helps provide solutions toward environmental problems. Trips to cultural locations and events, public works, agricultural areas, and wild habitats will present opportunities to evaluate practices and consider lower impact alternatives. Through immersion in Argentina's natural and constructed environments students will confront global environmental issues of the 21st century. Taught in Argentina by Dr. Bruce Schulte.

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Family & Consumer Sciences/Interior Design & Fashion
FACS 411-1 Topics in Consumer and Family Science: Cross-Cultural Perspectives on Family (3 hours)
A study of cultural influences upon family functions, structures, and behaviors, focusing on the recognition and understanding of cultural similarities and differences. A major emphasis will be placed on cultural variations in power distribution and sex roles. This course will cover topics such as cross-cultural family relationships related to the economy, government and religion; kinship systems and patterns of marital residence; differences in childrearing patterns; universal shifts from "traditional" families; and variations in roles of aging family members. Students will be required to read chapters from two textbooks and selected articles, reflect on personal experiences, observe and interview members of families and view films depicting families in different cultures. Written journals, papers and exams will be used to evaluate the students' learning. Taught in China by Dr. Neil Mecham.

FACS 411-2 Topics in Consumer and Family Science: The Impact of Culture on Human Development through the Lifespan (3 hours)
This course explores the importance of cultural influences on human development by examining individual, family and cultural practices from cultures around the world. Developmental theories and methodologies will serve as the foundation for examining the following topics: language, cognition, personality, social behavior, identity, sexuality, health and family relations. Students will be required to read from an assigned textbook and selected articles, reflect on personal experiences, observe and interview members of various backgrounds, and view films depicting different stages of development. Written journals, papers and exams will be used to evaluate the students' learning.
Taught in China by Dr. Neil Mecham.

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Film
FILM 399 Topics in Film: Modern China through Film (3 hours)
An introduction to the cinemas of mainland China, Hong Kong, and Taiwan, with a focus on how social, political and cultural changes of modern and contemporary China find their expressions in films. Students will learn basic skills for understanding and interpreting cinematic language and see beyond what is pleasing to the eye or entertaining: the sociopolitical circumstances under which Chinese films are made, their subtle ambiguities as well as overt messages, and their interpretations of history, the relationship between individual filmmakers' aesthetic styles and social concerns, among other things. Selected film topics include: the "golden days" of Chinese leftist cinema in the 1930s and 1940s; the imperative to create "socialist realist" art in China under Mao's leadership; the challenge to official ideology after the end of the Cultural Revolution; the attempts to capture the changing faces and new mysteries of China with a globalizing economy; contemporary Hong Kong and Taiwan films about urban life and cultural hybridity; and the representations of gender and China's cultural past in martial arts fantasies. Taught in China by Dr. Qian Gao.

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French
FREN 105 Introduction to French Culture (3 hours)
Survey of contemporary culture of France, with emphasis on values, behavioral characteristics, social and political structures, and achievements of the French-speaking people. Taught in English in Paris I by Prof. Eddy Cuisinier.

FREN 314 Introduction to French Literature: Short Stories and Poetry (3 hours)
This course will examine French literary movements primarily in the 19th and 20th century such as Romanticism, Realism and Post-Colonialism as they are revealed through poetry and short stories. Charles Baudelaire, Guillaume Apollinaire, Guy de Maupassant, Victor Hugo, Colette, and Maryse Conde will be some of the studied authors. Several of the stories and poems that we will read describe a specific place in Paris and so the class will take many field trips to neighborhoods, monuments and museums as part of the course. Among these include Victor Hugo's house, Pere Lachaise cemetery, the Eiffel Tower and the Rodin museum. Taught in French in Paris I by Dr. Melody Carriere.

FREN 321 French Conversation (3 hours)
This course will develop the student's ability to communicate in French on a variety of topics at the intermediate to advanced level. Class time will be devoted to the discussion of print/audio/video material studied outside of class. An emphasis will be placed on idiomatic expressions, correct pronunciation, and vocabulary pertaining to current events in France and the Francophone world. Field trips and extensive, themed walking tours will be an integral part of the course that allow the exploration of the city's many cafes, picturesque parks, and other famous public spaces. In addition to speaking with classmates and the instructor, students will prepare for and complete activities in which they converse with Parisian shopkeepers and other natives in a controlled way. Site visits subject to change based on the availability of guest speakers residing in Paris. Taught in French in Paris I by Dr. Julien Carriere.

FREN 323 French Civilization and Culture: The Cultural Heritage of Paris (3 hours)
This course focuses on examining and exploring the heritage of Paris. We will dive into the city looking at its rich heritage with various perspectives: its history, its art, its religion, its architecture. Students will be required to keep a personal travel journal, take photos, and visit at least seven sites a week. This course is not for the faint of heart. Each student is required to have an active mind, a curious heart, and a desire to explore. Taught in French in Paris II by Prof. Jeorg Ellen Sauer.

FREN 326 Survey of French Literature II (3 hours)
Reading of French literary texts representing the masterpieces of this important branch of French civilization; lectures on literary history and criticism. The period covered is the 19th and 20th centuries. Focus on Victor Hugo and Les Miserables. Taught in French in Paris II by Dr. John Secor.

FREN 328 French Diction and Pronunciation (3 hours)
Mastery of fluent French diction and pronunciation through intensive practice with sounds, stress, rhythm, linking, phrasing, and intonation. Applications through study and practice of French poetry.
Taught in French in Paris II by Dr. John Secor.

FREN 426 French Literature of the Twentieth Century: French Theatre in Performance (3 hours)
The goal of this course is to explore the history of the French theater by attending performances of plays in Paris. We will see at least one production per week. Prior to the performances, we will read and discuss the texts of the scheduled play, and, following the performance, continue our discussion through analyses of production choices made by the director and actors. The plays we choose will depend on what is being shown in Paris during the five weeks of our course. We will try to see works from different genres—comedy, tragedy, experimental, etc.—and from different historical periods. We will emphasize textual analysis, as well as principles of production: staging, costumes, acting, set design, lighting, music, etc. The course is taught entirely in French. Taught in French in Paris II by Dr. Jeffrey Peters.

FREN 499-1 War, Literature, Film (3 hours)
Examines the various strategies that French writers and filmmakers have used to translate the experience and memory of World War I and World War II into literary and cinematic form. Topics will include eyewitness testimony, uses of irony and humor, the representation of disfigurement, collaboration with the enemy, and practices of commemoration. Students will also visit a number of museums, memorials and other sites of interest in the study of war culture.
Taught in French in Paris II by Dr. Leon Sachs.

FREN 499-2 The Art of Ecology (3 hours)
This course explores the intersection of art and ecology through the lens of French film, literature, contemporary debates and on-site visits to parks, gardens and other sites of ecological significance in and around Paris.
Taught in French in Paris II by Dr. Leon Sachs.

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Gender & Women's Studies
GWS 200 Introduction to Gender and Women's Studies (3 hours)
Drawing on historical perspectives and cultural analysis, this course examines such topics as women and work, violence against women, family, and the social construction of gender, sexuality, race, and class.
Taught in Italy by Dr. Ann Andaloro.

GWS 470 Gender and Women's Studies: People of the Corn - Traditional Recipes for a Small Planet (3 hours)
For Mexicans, maize is not a crop but a deep cultural symbol for the daily lives of peasants and indigenous people. In this course, we will examine the politics of food in the Mexican context, while centralizing traditional forms of cooking in Mexico. The "three sisters" crops: corn, beans, and squash, form the basis for nutrition and the small ecological footprint of this traditional cuisine. Outside of reading and discussing, we will spend our time preparing traditional foods with women in their own kitchens. Taught in Mexico by Dr. Marguerite Rivage-Seul.

NURS 317-2/PH 464 Topics: Women's Health in Tanzania (3 hours)
A survey of the status of women's health in Tanzania. We will look at women's health throughout the lifespan, how it is affected by cultural, religious and socioeconomic factors (such as sexual discrimination and the use of traditional healers). We examine selected health problems which are particular for Tanzanian women such as female circumcision, high fertility rate, high maternal mortality, low contraceptive use and domestic violence. This course utilizes a holistic perspective and will be coordinated with visits to hospitals, clinics, and meetings with doctors and nurses and other health professionals. Seminar/discussion format with journaling and written reflections of experiences are used as classroom techniques. Students will present on a variety of topics relevant to the course and based on experiences in the field.
Taught in Tanzania by Prof. Adele Dean.

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Geography/Environmental Studies
GEOG 280/BIOL 280 Introduction to Environmental Science: Argentina from the Andes to Buenos Aires (3 hours)
Argentina is a land of contrasts from the uninhabitable high Andes to the bustling port of Buenos Aires, the second largest metropolitan area in South America. The country's population has increased five-fold in the past century, bringing with it prosperity and a host of environmental impacts. This course will examine the natural resources of Argentina and the history and present condition of environmental impacts. Students will gain an understanding of how science informs and helps provide solutions toward environmental problems. Trips to cultural locations and events, public works, agricultural areas, and wild habitats will present opportunities to evaluate practices and consider lower impact alternatives. Through immersion in Argentina's natural and constructed environments students will confront global environmental issues of the 21st century. Taught in Argentina by Dr. Bruce Schulte.

GEOG 430 Topics in Cultural Geography: Catalan Culture and Identity (3 hours) or
INT 450-1 Foreign Field Studies: Catalan Culture and Identity (3 hours)

Barcelona is the largest city in Catalonia, a linguistic and cultural community that is divided among three political entities: Spain, France and Andorra. In this class, we study the Catalan cultural and linguistic community in its various contexts, and also give some attention to the many other linguistic minorities in Europe. Taught in Barcelona by Dr. Philip Krummrich.

GEOG 475-1 Topics in Geography: Physical and Biogeography of the Andes (3 hours)
Examines the physical geography of the Ecuadorian Andes. Topics will include geomorphology, meteorology, soil science, biogeography and microclimatology, taking advantage of the multiple ecosystems and elevations at which the program will visit during the course. Prerequisite: GEOG 100 (Physical Geography) or equivalent course.
Taught in Ecuador by Prof. Ryan Kelly.

GEOG 475-2 Topics in Geography: People and Places of the Mediterranean (3 hours) Honors credit available
Defined by a body of water in its middle, the Mediterranean is one of the world's most diverse regions. Paying close attention to the physical landscape, this course employs a "Place as Text" pedagogical model that encourages students, often in small groups, actively to investigate the economic activities and daily lives of the people of the Mediterranean. Making use of five basic learning strategies—mapping, observing, listening, discussing, and reflecting—students examine the longstanding exchange of ideas, goods, people, and culture in a region that encompasses North Africa, West Asia, the Middle East, and Southern Europe. Taught in Greece by Dr. John Dizgun.

GEOG 480 Urban Geography: Argentina (3 hours) Graduate credit available
This course provides an introduction to the study of urban geography. In addition to a general introduction about the study of cities, the course examines and compares Buenos Aires and Mendoza, Argentina, to address development issues arising from globalization, neo-liberalism, and internal planning strategies. Special emphasis is placed on the challenge of megacities (Buenos Aires has over 12 million population) and on the planning and environmental issues faced by smaller urban areas (Mendoza) in relatively weaker developed countries like Argentina. The course uses "Place as Text" as an active learning approach to understanding cities and their development challenges. This involves walking through, analyzing, and interpreting the city as an economic, political, social, cultural, and infrastructural statement about meaning and identity. Taught in Argentina by Dr. David Keeling.

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German
GERM 100-1 Basic German Conversation (3 hours)
This basic German course will focus heavily on the conversational skills students will find most useful in navigating Bregenz and interacting with its inhabitants. Major topics will include personal introductions, travel, public transportation, shopping, and restaurant vocabulary. Throughout the class students will be challenged to identify the uniquely German characteristics of each of these topics and to contrast them with American culture. In-class instruction will be supported by frequent forays into the real-world settings offered in Bregenz, where students can put their newly-learned skills to the test. Taught in Bregenz (Austria) by Prof. Tim Straubel.

GERM 100-2 Basic German Conversation (3 hours)
This basic German course will focus heavily on the conversational skills students will find most useful in navigating Berlin and interacting with its inhabitants. Major topics will include personal introductions, travel, public transportation, shopping, and restaurant vocabulary. Throughout the class students will be challenged to identify the uniquely German characteristics of each of these topics and to contrast them with American culture. In-class instruction will be supported by frequent forays into the real-world settings offered in Berlin, where students can put their newly-learned skills to the test.
Taught in Berlin by Dr. Sylvia Henneberg.

GERM 210 Intermediate German Conversation Abroad (3 hours)
A course designed to develop the vocabulary and oral communication skills of the student with a background of one year of college German or equivalent. Course covers topic areas such as greetings and common courtesies, food and dining out etiquette, hotel situations, traveling in Europe, getting around in cities, one's everyday routine, invitations, etc. The topics also incorporate aspects of pertinent structural elements for effective communication.
Taught in German in Bregenz (Austria) by Prof. Tim Straubel.

GERM 306-1 Experiencing German Abroad: German Stylistics in the Alps (3 hours)
We will use our central theme, Visiting and Living in the Alps, to allow students to create their "alternate identity" based on the scenario context of the course and engage in extensive role-play and creative exercises to use the grammatical features covered during the course. The course is centered around the textbook, on-site materials (such as a local paper, street signs and plaques, advertisements), and experiences that present themselves by living in Austria. Exercises will involve speaking, writing, reading, and listening. Students will review, refine, and expand their knowledge and usage of German structures such as past tense forms, subjunctive, word order, passive, and so forth.
Taught in German in Bregenz (Austria) by Dr. Margaret Brown.

GERM 306-2 Experiencing German Abroad: The Cultural Heritage of Munich (3 hours)
This course is designed for an in-depth exploration of the history and culture of Munich and Bavaria. Students practice their written, reading, listening and spoken German language skills while enjoying afternoon excursions into Munich and a weekend trip to Nuremberg. There are further opportunities to visit other German cities during independent travel weekends. Taught in German in Munich by Dr. Ronald Warner.

GERM 330 German Composition and Conversation (3 hours)
Develops skill in writing and speaking standard German. Stress is on vocabulary building, use of dictionary and control of sentence structures. Skill in spoken German is aimed at enabling the students to find their way around the environment and to function in a social situation. Taught in German in Munich by a Local Instructor.

GERM 430 Advanced German Stylistics (3 hours)
Provides intensive grammar instruction and practice in written and spoken German, enabling the student to write letters, reports, essays, and descriptions. Students investigate aspects of German structure that they notice around them.
Taught in German in Munich by Dr. Laura Wilson.

GERM 455 Topics: History of German Lyric Poetry from Early Times to Present (3 hours)
This course is an introductory survey of the development and beauty of German lyric poetry beginning with modern German translations of poems and songs of the Old and Middle High German periods that will trace the development of Lyric poetry through the ages and the various literary periods to modern times. We will dissect and discuss some of the most significant and representative poems of the most significant poets and literary periods and schools and learn about such stylistic matters as meter, rhythm, rhyme forms, verse and stanza constructions. The main goal of the course will be to awaken in the student a genuine interest and appreciation for this very important facet of German literary history and culture. Taught in German in Munich by Dr. Ronald Warner.

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Graduate Courses
A selection of study abroad courses (taught in English) are offered for graduate credit to students who have completed their undergraduate degree. For course descriptions, see corresponding undergraduate course in the specific subject area. If interested in receiving graduate credit in another KIIS course, contact Dr. John Dizgun.

ART 401G Art of the Italian Renaissance
Taught in Italy by Dr. Chris Fulton.

ART 490G Topics: Museum Exhibition & Display
Taught in Berlin by Prof. John Begley.

ART 491G Topics: Contemporary Arts Practice
Taught in Berlin by Prof. John Begley.

ART 491-8 Topics: Individual Topics in the History of Art
Taught in Prague by Dr. Zbynek "ZB" Smetana.

BA 592 Topics in Business: Management Strategy and Policy
Taught in Argentina by Dr. Uday Tate.

BA 592 Topics in Business: Global Marketing Strategy
Taught in Argentina by Dr. Uday Tate.

BIOL 430G Evolution: Theory and Process
Taught in Ecuador by Dr. Malcolm Frisbie.

BIOL 485G-1 Field Biology: Tropical Biodiversity and Conservation
Taught in Ecuador by Dr. Suzanne Strait.

BIOL 485G-2 Field Biology: Galapagos Islands: Beauty, Significance, & Challenge (1 hour)
Team-taught in Ecuador by Dr. Malcolm Frisbie and by Dr. Suzanne Strait.

CNS 595-1/LEAD Internship: Assistant to the Program Director (3 credits)
The Assistant to the Program Director Internship enables students to shadow a summer or winter KIIS program director. In consultation with the KIIS office and KIIS director, the student creates a personalized work plan outlining the duties and responsibilities to be performed. Previous interns have assisted with residence life duties, accounting and administration, orientation, risk management, and communication between students & faculty. Interns apply for a specific KIIS program and receive a $300 scholarship. Contact Dr. John Dizgun for details.

ENG 597 Topics in English: Classical Greek Comedy
Taught in Greece by Dr. Paul Ranieri.

GEOG 580 Urban Geography: Argentina
Taught in Argentina by Dr. David Keeling.

HIST 490G Topics: Day to Day in Ancient Greece
Taught in Greece by Dr. Chris Shea.

HCA 347 International Comparisons of Health Care Systems: Comparative Health Systems
Taught in Tanzania by Dr. Monika Sawhney.

HCA 459G Global Health Service-Learning Practicum
Taught in Tanzania by Dr. William Mkanta.

NURS 317-1 Topics: Community/Public Health Clinical Nursing Practicum
Taught in Tanzania by Prof. Adele Dean.

NURS 317-2/PH 464 Topics: Women's Health in Tanzania
Taught in Tanzania by Prof. Adele Dean.

PH 585 Global Health
Taught in Tanzania by Dr. Monika Sawhney.

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History
HIST 479-1 Topics: The History of Traditional China to 1271 CE (3 hours)
Chinese civilization (for most of its 5,000 years) has been the biggest, most densely inhabited, richest, and most powerful on earth. It is essential Westerners understand where China has been to understand its future impact upon us. This course answers the need to understand what Chinese culture is all about. It begins with geography and archeology, covers the rise of the first dynasties (Shi Huang Di, Terracotta Soldiers, and Great Wall), the development of Confucianism, Taoism, and Buddhism (Confucian Academies, Taoist and Buddhist temples), the long lasting Han Dynasty (burial practices and military organization) and later dynasties (Sui, Tang, Song and their intellectual, cultural, and artistic contributions). The course then concludes with the Mongols (Genghis Khan). At completion students will have an appreciation of the first part of China's long and complex history, vital for us as active participants in the life of our country and world.
Taught in China by Dr. Steven White.

HIST 479-2 Topics: British Imperialism in China during the Long Nineteenth Century (1750-1914 CE) (3 hours)
This course examines the clash of empires ending with the decline of one (China) and rise of another (Britain). These events caused a Chinese xenophobia, still seen today. This course will examine the roots of this attitude. Chinese history has often been taught as a series of "guo chi," (national humiliations by foreign powers). Britain coerced China into accepting unequal treaties, legalization of opium, and cession of Hong Kong. China's humiliations at British hands will be examined and the course will show how these events still shape the complicated relationship between China and the West today. Mccartney, Qianlong, Amherst, Napier and Elliot, Opium Wars, Lord Elgin's revenge, the Taiping Rebellion, the Boxer Rebellion, and fall of the Qing Dynasty will be covered. At the end of this course students will have a greater understanding of the power of Chinese nationalism and how it impacts our lives today. Taught in China by Dr. Steven White.

HIST 479-3 Topics: The Ottoman Empire - A Social, Political, and Religious History (3 hours)
Engages (by way of readings, discussion and excursions) the history (and religions) of the Ottoman Empire from its inception in the 13th century to its apogee in the 16th century. Along with texts and novels, we use the rich Ottoman culture and architecture that remains for us in Istanbul to decipher this complex and powerful empire.
Taught in Istanbul by Dr. Tom McCollough.

HIST 490-1/RELS 399 Topics: The Holocaust in History and Memory (3 hours)
The Holocaust, the Nazi's systematic murder of nearly six million Jews and millions of others considered to be racially inferior or enemies of the state, is a defining event of the twentieth century. Drawing on a number of disciplines—including history, religion, sociology, psychology—we will attempt to deepen our understanding of the causes, course, and consequences of this world-shattering epoch. Reflection on the Holocaust will confront us with a host of questions about the nature of prejudice, responsibility, and power. The first half of the course will focus on the historical background and context of the Holocaust. The second half will be devoted a multidisciplinary exploration of the motives and actions of perpetrators, victims, bystanders, and rescuers, as well as consideration the Holocaust's continuing presence and impact on European society. We will pay special attention to events in Berlin. Taught in Berlin by Dr. Steve Gowler.

HIST 490-2 Topics: Divided City, Divided Souls: The Berlin Wall and German Film (3 hours)
The Berlin Wall stands as the most powerful symbol of the Cold War. It was a physical reminder of the stark differences between the reigning post-World War II ideals and ideologies in the West. While it signaled a tragic constriction of freedom, it has been source of remarkable inspiration for novelists, memoirists, and filmmakers. We will watch, discuss, and contextualize five great films about the Wall and the aspirations, expectations, and experiences of Berliners dwelling on each side of it: Wim Wenders' Der Himmel uber Berlin; Tom Tykwer's Lola rennt; Volker Schlondorff's Die Stille nach dem Schuss; Wolfgang Becker's Goodbye, Lenin!; and Florian Henckel von Donnersmarck's Das Leben der Anderen.
Taught in Berlin by Dr. Steve Gowler.

HIST 490-3 Topics: Modern Europe and the Danish Microcosm (3 hours)
This course will explore modern European history from the sixteenth-century Scientific Revolution through the Twentieth Century, using Denmark as both focal point and lens. This small, outlying kingdom has sometimes contributed significantly to Europe's major religious, cultural, social, and political developments, and at other times has been forced to react to events and wider trends originating elsewhere. Unlike traditional European history courses that emphasize France, England, and the Holy Roman Empire as the centers of action, the course will emphasize how history looks different when told from varied perspectives. Taught in Denmark by Dr. Carolyn Dupont.

HIST 490-4 Topics: Day to Day in Ancient Greece (3 hours) Graduate or Honors credit available
What did the ancients wear? eat? hate? love? How did they spend their days and nights? How did they survive without the car, movies, texting? How did they make their money? What did they think about the good life, death, politics, sex? Why do we care? This course explores the ordinary lives of ancient Greeks- and of the Romans, Jews, and Christians who lived near them- as we wander their towns and poke our noses into what remains of their homes, temples, stores, streets. Note: any student with a 3.2 GPA or above can enroll in this course for Honors credit. Students enrolled for Honors credit will have more challenging and unconventional assignments that will require greater analytical, creative, and critical thinking skills. Taught in Greece by Dr. Christine Shea.

HIST 490-5 Topics: Modern Greece (3 hours) Honors credit available
This course employs a "Place as Text" pedagogical model that encourages stu- dents, often in small groups, actively to investigate the history, culture, geography, economics, and politics of modern Greek society. Making use of five basic learning strategies—mapping, observing, listening, discussing, and reflecting—students regularly explore areas of Athens and the legendary Greek isles. Course topics include Greek unification efforts in the 19th and 20th centuries, Greek identity, Greco-Turkish relations, the fragile nature of Greek democracy, migration, Greek entrance into the European Union, and the effects of the ongoing economic crisis. Taught in Greece by Dr. John Dizgun.

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Honors Courses
Any student with a 3.2 GPA or above can enroll in these courses for Honors credit. Students enrolled for Honors credit will have more challenging and unconventional assignments that will require greater analytical, creative, and critical thinking skills. If interested in receiving honors credit in another KIIS course, contact Dr. John Dizgun.

HON: Classical Greek Comedy (3 hours)
After discussing Comedy as defined by Aristotle's Poetics, students compare and contrast the bawdy, satirical, chorus-based Old Comedy of 5th century BC Greece with the realistic, moralistic, character-based New Comedy of the 4th century BC. While studying Aristophanes and Menander, students become acquainted with the evolution of style and content as connected to the writers' social and political environment, as well as their influence on contemporary comedy. Such themes as education, politics, war, families, mistaken identity, and love gained/lost/gained again are examined.
Taught in Greece by Dr. Paul Ranieri.

HON: Day to Day in Ancient Greece (3 hours)
What did the ancients wear? eat? hate? love? How did they spend their days and nights? How did they survive without the car, movies, texting? How did they make their money? What did they think about the good life, death, politics, sex? Why do we care? This course explores the ordinary lives of ancient Greeks- and of the Romans, Jews, and Christians who lived near them- as we wander their towns and poke our noses into what remains of their homes, temples, stores, streets. Note: any student with a 3.2 GPA or above can enroll in this course for Honors credit. Students enrolled for Honors credit will have more challenging and unconventional assignments that will require greater analytical, creative, and critical thinking skills. Taught in Greece by Dr. Christine Shea.

HON: Greek Myth in Context (3 hours)
No stories contain greater richness and depth and none have been more influential than those we call "Greek myths." In this class students learn important ancient Greek tales while visiting sites in which many of these myths are said to have taken place—Athens, Eleusis, Delos, Delphi, Argos, and Mycenae. Meanwhile, students learn to read these tales as represented in Greek art—on vases and in sculpture that we view. Note: any student with a 3.2 GPA or above can enroll in this course for Honors credit. Students enrolled for Honors credit will have more challenging and unconventional assignments that will require greater analytical, creative, and critical thinking skills. Taught in Greece by Dr. Richard King.

HON: Modern Greece (3 hours)
This course employs a "Place as Text" pedagogical model that encourages stu- dents, often in small groups, actively to investigate the history, culture, geography, economics, and politics of modern Greek society. Making use of five basic learning strategies—mapping, observing, listening, discussing, and reflecting—students regularly explore areas of Athens and the legendary Greek isles. Course topics include Greek unification efforts in the 19th and 20th centuries, Greek identity, Greco-Turkish relations, the fragile nature of Greek democracy, migration, Greek entrance into the European Union, and the effects of the ongoing economic crisis. Taught in Greece by Dr. John Dizgun.

HON: People and Places of the Mediterranean (3 hours)
Defined by a body of water in its middle, the Mediterranean is one of the world's most diverse regions. Paying close attention to the physical landscape, this course employs a "Place as Text" pedagogical model that encourages students, often in small groups, actively to investigate the economic activities and daily lives of the people of the Mediterranean. Making use of five basic learning strategies—mapping, observing, listening, discussing, and reflecting—students examine the longstanding exchange of ideas, goods, people, and culture in a region that encompasses North Africa, West Asia, the Middle East, and Southern Europe. Taught in Greece by Dr. John Dizgun.

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Horticulture
HORT 475 Topics in Agriculture: Wines of France: The Taste of Stars (3 hours)
Since the fall of the Roman Empire, no country has influenced the world of wine more than France. France's vineyards, grapes, wine and winemakers produce more diversity than the rest of the world combined! France is the birthplace of the idea that geography, or terroir, is fundamental in shaping the character and quality of the wine. A focus on the life of Louis Pasteur, the father of modern enology, and a visit to the Pasteur Institute will be among the highlights. When describing wine, to know the difference between framboise and frais des bois is like knowing the difference between the subtle and sublime. Taught in Paris I by Prof. Blake Layne.

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Interior Design & Fashion Merchandising
IDFM 423/ART 491-5 Human Environment Study Tour: Italian Design (3 hours)
If the Italians did not invent design, then it is a wonder as to who else could have possessed the creative resources to do so. This course draws upon the rich and variegated Italian environment to study several forms of design: graphic, interior, fashion, industrial, architectural, packaging, furniture and advertising. Field trips give students direct experience of design and illuminate the principles behind historical and modern design practices. Visiting design studios, retail shops, architectural sites and other venues will be an invaluable experience for anyone in the field of art, design, architecture or advertising. Taught in Italy by Prof. Mary Grassell.

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Internships & Service-Learning
The Internship & Service-Learning courses below are open to undergraduate and graduate. Additional international internships may be available.

CNS 595-1/LEAD Internship: Assistant to the Program Director (3 credits)
(Graduate students & Undergraduate seniors only)
The Assistant to the Program Director Internship enables students to shadow a summer or winter KIIS program director. In consultation with the KIIS office and KIIS director, the student creates a personalized work plan outlining the duties and responsibilities to be performed. Previous interns have assisted with residence life duties, accounting and administration, orientation, risk management, and communication between students & faculty. Interns apply for a specific KIIS program and receive a $300 scholarship. Contact Dr. John Dizgun for details.

HCA 459 Global Health Service-Learning Practicum (3-6 credits) Graduate credit available
The Global Health Service-Learning (GHSL) practicum opens doors for both undergraduate and graduate students in health professions such as medicine, nursing, nutrition, social work, and health administration to apply their skills alongside their Tanzanian counterparts while serving the health needs of the community. Key populations targeted by the program include the youth, HIV/AIDS patients, orphans, and a university community. The GHSL practicum can also be taken as an internship for students in health-related majors. Taught in Tanzania by Dr. William Mkanta.

Other Internship Opportunities are available in Tanzania for both undergraduate and graduate students in health professions such as medicine, nursing, nutrition, social work, and health administration. Interested students should contact KIIS Tanzania Program Director Dr. William Mkanta.

PERF 461-1 Performing Arts Practicum III (3-6 credits)
The KIIS Montreal internship provides students with a personalized experience at the prestigious Segal Centre for Performing Arts in Montreal. It is designed to provide students the opportunity to gain real-world experience in their field of choice (with the exception of acting). Interns focus on one of the following fields at the Segal Centre: design (set, lighting, costumes), stage and sound management, production management, and marketing/public relations. Interns help out with the theatre's play offerings alongside the rest of the Segal Centre team. Students have the option of earning three credit hours (one-month internship) or six credit hours (two-month internship). Students must indicate on their applications the track and time period they wish to intern. Contact KIIS Montreal Internship Director Prof. Eddy Cuisinier for details.

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Intercultural Studies
INT 450-1/GEOG 430 Foreign Field Studies: Catalan Culture and Identity (3 hours)
Barcelona is the largest city in Catalonia, a linguistic and cultural community that is divided among three political entities: Spain, France and Andorra. In this class, we study the Catalan cultural and linguistic community in its various contexts, and also give some attention to the many other linguistic minorities in Europe. Taught in Barcelona by Dr. Philip Krummrich.

INT 450-2/MLNG 480 Foreign Field Studies: Found in Translation (3 hours)
In this course, we consider the role of translation in culture, the practical problems involved in attempting to translate a text from one language (and culture) into another, and the special issues that confront translators in bilingual communities such as Catalonia. Taught in Barcelona by Dr. Philip Krummrich.

INT 450-3 Foreign Field Studies: Echoes of Classical Greece in 21st Century Life (3 hours)
Classical Greek culture surrounds us in our 21st century. This course focuses on significant aspects of Classical Greek and Hellenistic culture, particularly the fine arts, government, religion, history, education, language, and literature. Examples of topics include the following: democracy/citizenship/the self, education/knowledge, virtue/ excellence/ethos, public space/art, and men/women/love/beauty. Emphasis on selective aspects of a past culture and civilization, but with a look toward life as we know it in our contemporary United States. Taught in Greece by Dr. Paul Ranieri.

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Japanese
JAPN 210 Intermediate Japanese Conversation Abroad (3 hours)
A course designed to develop the vocabulary and oral communication skills of the student with a background of one year of college Japanese or equivalent. Emphasis is placed on bringing the student into contact with Japanese native speakers and various aspects of their culture. Taught in Japanese in Japan by Prof. Yoko Hatakeyama.

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Journalism
JOUR 481/ART 491-6 Topics: New Media Publishing (3 hours)
From the historic study of the printed word to contemporary digital publishing technologies, this course will traverse words, visuals and kinetics in storytelling with a hands-on investigation of new media publishing. Students will use their Italian field experiences as content for a new media publication and then push that content to print. Media production, brand building, and design problem-solving practiced through this course transfers equally well to journalism, creative writing, graphic design and the humanities. Taught in Italy by Prof. Christine Ingersoll.

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Leadership Studies
LEAD 475 Leadership Studies: Leading in Diverse and Global Environments (3 hours)
This course will explore leading in both diverse and global environments. Students will gain an appreciation for the importance of understanding global diversity, experiences, and viewpoints. This course looks at the many issues involved in leading in these dynamic contexts by examining concepts such as race, ethnicity, sexual orientation, gender, identity, prejudice and privilege, worldviews, culture, the roles of government, legal formalities, and foreign language acquisition. Upon completion of this course, students will understand issues of intercultural leadership and communication and build their capacities and skills for leading in diverse and global contexts. Attention will also be given to dimensions of cross-cultural interactions in organizational behavior. Taught in Bregenz (Austria) by Dr. Jeffrey Zimmerman.

LEAD Internship: Assistant to the Program Director (3 credits)
(Graduate students & Undergraduate seniors only)
The Assistant to the Program Director Internship enables students to shadow a summer or winter KIIS program director. In consultation with the KIIS office and KIIS director, the student creates a personalized work plan outlining the duties and responsibilities to be performed. Previous interns have assisted with residence life duties, accounting and administration, orientation, risk management, and communication between students & faculty. Interns apply for a specific KIIS program and receive a $300 scholarship. Contact Dr. John Dizgun for details.

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Management
MGT 303 International Business (3 hours)
Fundamentals of international business particularly in planning, organizing, and control aspects of the multinational enterprise. Roles of government, culture, foreign currency, taxes, political risk, and legal formalities for large and small firms entering new markets are emphasized. Particular attention will be given to dimensions of cross-cultural interactions in organizational behavior. Taught in Bregenz (Austria) by Dr. Anita Lee-Post.

MGT 316 International Management (3 hours)
Want to experience first-hand how European firms address issues of managing a global business enterprise? Through this course, you will have a chance to observe and examine the workings of business operations on-site in Bregenz as well as nearby European cities such as Zurich and Munich. You will be able to gain an understanding of the managerial challenges, technological enablers and environmental concerns of managing business in a global environment. A European perspective of international business management will be beneficial to US firms as they seek to compete in the global arena.
Taught in Bregenz (Austria) by Dr. Anita Lee-Post.

MGT 498 Strategy and Policy (3 hours) Graduate credit available
Management Strategy is an integrative capstone course that challenges students to bring together all of their learned functional knowledge base (e.g., accounting, finance, marketing, supply chain, etc.) and organizational skills (e.g., leadership, communications, planning, organizing, executing, decision making, etc.) and apply them to study organizational problems that confront top management. The class format will use case analysis/discussions, critique of an article, and participation in a sophisticated, Internet-based business strategy computer simulation.
Taught in Argentina by Dr. Uday Tate.

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Marketing
MKT 491 Marketing Study Abroad: Global Marketing Strategy (3 hours) Graduate credit available
Global Marketing is a study of marketing across national borders; emphasis is placed on foreign environments (cultural, economic, political, technological, and ethical), a methods of entry, and development of marketing plan and marketing mix to export a product to a foreign country. Specifically, the course will focus on the following course objectives: (a) to identify the reasons as to why companies engage in international marketing operations, (b) to examine the environmental factors that affect international operations, (c) to design a marketing strategy and marketing mix within a global context, (d) to examine and assess cutting edge issues in International Marketing, and (e) to identify and evaluate various entry strategies in global markets. Taught in Argentina by Dr. Uday Tate.

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Modern Languages (see also Chinese, German, French, Japanese, Spanish, Swahili)

MLNG 105 Introduction to Culture Abroad: Introduction to Czech Culture (3 hours)
A survey of the contemporary culture of Bohemia and Moravia, with emphasis on values, behavioral characteristics, social and political structures, and achievements of the Czech-speaking people. The focus is on an immersive learning experience—an intensive cultural study in context. We will explore diverse off-the-beaten-path cultural sites through walking tours of Prague's cafes, pubs, parks, and neighborhoods. Taught in English in Prague by Prof. Marketa Cawood.

MLNG 480/INT 450-2 Topics in Modern Languages and Cultures: Found in Translation (3 hours)
In this course, we consider the role of translation in culture, the practical problems involved in attempting to translate a text from one language (and culture) into another, and the special issues that confront translators in bilingual communities such as Catalonia. Taught in English in Barcelona by Dr. Philip Krummrich.

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Music
MUS 200 Theory III (3 hours)
The course addresses: modulation; chromatic harmony and harmonic practice of the 19th century into the 20th century; introduction to non-tonal practice, serialism, extended tertian harmonies; analytical methods, and requisite aural skills. Emphasis is placed on dictation and analysis, and techniques for contextual analysis of challenging passages taken from the repertoire. Taught in Salzburg by Dr. Mark Zanter.

MUS 327 History of Music II (3 hours)
Salzburg is home to a wide range of significant figures from music history, including Mozart, Hummel, Michael Haydn, and countless others. History of Music II focuses on the major composers and important performance trends of the Classical and Early Romantic periods (ca. 1750-1850). The student cultivates an awareness of the social, historical and philosophical ideas that influences those musical styles, and studies the repertoire of this period through readings, lectures, discussions, analysis and score study, individual and group projects, concert attendance and excursions around Salzburg.
Taught in Salzburg by Dr. Francisc Restesan.

MUS 328 History of Music III (3 hours)
Salzburg is home to a plethora of significant figures from music history. Music History III focuses on the major composers and important musical forms of the Late Romantic and Twentieth Century (ca. 1850 - present). The student cultivates an awareness of the social, historical and philosophical ideas that influences those musical styles and those specific works through readings, lectures, discussions, analysis and score study, individual and group projects and concert attendance. Taught in Salzburg by Dr. Jennifer Brimson.

MUS 338-1 Directed Study: Form and Analysis (3 hours)
The study of the basic formal structures of tonal and twentieth century music through score study, contextual listening and other exercises. Taught in Salzburg by Dr. Mark Zanter.

MUS 338-2 Directed Study: Instrumental/Choral Conducting (3 hours)
Instrumental and Choral conducting develops the conducting technique of the musician through analysis and score study, individual and group exercises, study of conduction drills, individual works and excerpts, individual "podium" time for conducting and rehearsing, and self-evaluation of videotaped exercises. The student works toward the refinement of controlled 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 patterns and their subdivisions, the polishing of basic techniques including preparations, cut-offs, cues, fermate, dynamics, articulations, changes of tempo, irregular meters and expressive gesture. Emphasis is placed on the continued development of left hand techniques for dynamics, cues and phrases. In addition, the student fosters the development of score study and preparation skills, ear training and evaluation skills and the development of rehearsal technique and organization. Taught in Salzburg by Prof. Scot Buzza.

MUS 374 Opera Theatre (1 credit hour)
This course is a study of operatic literature focusing on Austrian and German composers. Some historical study to provide the context for these scenes will also be featured. Students will view opera films, write reviews, go to an opera, and prepare a public performance. Other features of the class will include characterization and improvisation exercises, introduction to body awareness, Alexander Technique, relaxation techniques, staging, audition procedures, resume writing, stage deportment, etc. Students will be assigned scenes to study and perform at the end of the program. (Audition Required). Note: while only 1 credit hour, this course is intensive and requires a significant time commitment on the part of each student. Taught in Salzburg by Prof. Gayle Grout.

MUS 430-1 Music Literature: Orchestral and Choral Repertoire (3 hours)
This course is a study of the major masterworks for choir and orchestra through a historical lens, score analysis, and performance. Students will analyze works of Mozart, Bach, Haydn and other major composers from a theoretical perspective, and use this as a basis for interpretive decisions regarding tempi, stylistic concerns, and other aspects of performance. The final project will consist of singing/playing/conducting a complete work in public performance. Taught in Salzburg by Dr. Francisc Restesan.

MUS 430-2 Music Literature: Woodwind Literature (3 hours)
This course provides an overview of woodwind literature from early mixed consorts through to Twentieth Century. We will study representative examples from solo, chamber and orchestral literature for flute, oboe, clarinet, bassoon and saxophone, including significant examples from the woodwind quintet repertory. Taught in Salzburg by Dr. Jennifer Brimson.

KIIS Salzburg Choral Ensemble (no credit)
Singers and instrumentalists will have the opportunity for public performances of choral repertoire in order to supplement material covered in the Conducting class, as well as in Orchestral and Choral Literature. In this extra-curricular ensemble appropriate works are chosen, studied, rehearsed and performed in several Austrian concert venues. Taught in Salzburg by multiple faculty members.

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Nursing
NURS 317-1 Topics: Community/Public Health Clinical Nursing Practicum (3 hours)
This is the clinical component of a course required for all BSN nursing students. It explores theories that form Tanzanian viewpoints on health and illness. This course includes visits to a variety of community agencies in the host city such as hospitals, clinics and others that serve a diversity of risk groups. It includes meetings with physicians, nurses as well as traditional healers in the community. Class time is spent in discussion about basic community/public health concepts and planning activities in the community. Assignments include health teaching, screening, case finding, referral, and evaluation of community services and culminate with a detailed written and comprehensive community assessment of a selected population of the city. Taught in Tanzania by Prof. Adele Dean.

NURS 317-2/PH 464 Topics: Women's Health in Tanzania (3 hours)
A survey of the status of women's health in Tanzania. We will look at women's health throughout the lifespan, how it is affected by cultural, religious and socioeconomic factors (such as sexual discrimination and the use of traditional healers). We examine selected health problems which are particular for Tanzanian women such as female circumcision, high fertility rate, high maternal mortality, low contraceptive use and domestic violence. This course utilizes a holistic perspective and will be coordinated with visits to hospitals, clinics, and meetings with doctors and nurses and other health professionals. Seminar/discussion format with journaling and written reflections of experiences are used as classroom techniques. Students will present on a variety of topics relevant to the course and based on experiences in the field.
Taught in Tanzania by Prof. Adele Dean.

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Political Science
PS 250 International Politics (3 hours)
An introductory course in international relations which is designed to acquaint the student with basic theories, terminology, motivations, inter-relationships and problems on an international scale. Taught in Spain (May) by Dr. Shawn Schulenberg.

PS 365 Government and Politics of the Middle East (3 hours)
This course is intended to provide you with essential background information on the Middle East: the cultures and history; the geopolitics of the region; the politics of religion; colonialism and nationalism in the region; and a survey of selected contemporary political issues from the region. Concepts such as political development, economic development, economic growth, colonialism, neocolonialism, and other key concepts will be discussed. Special focus will be on Lebanon and the Palestinian-Israeli conflict. Taught in Istanbul by Dr. Ihsan Alkhatib.

PS 460 The Role of Islam in Modern Turkey (3 hours)
This course will examine the role of Islam in modern Turkey. Our aim is to analyze and compare the role of Islam in Turkey and how it relates to the phenomenon of global Islam as a political force on the world stage. We will try to identify the varying social, economic and political developments in Turkey as variables helping understand the Turkish experience. Taught in Istanbul by Dr. Ihsan Alkhatib.

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Psychology
PSY 199 Introduction to Developmental Psychology (3 hours)
A general course in developmental psychology covering the entire life span. Included are a description of growth stages, theories of development, and research methods of development. Taught in Spain (May) by Dr. Myra Beth Bundy.

PSY 299-1 Topics: Sigmund Freud and Psychoanalysis (3 hours)
Psychology as an independent discipline began in the German speaking world and perhaps one of the most notorious figures in the field of psychology is Sigmund Freud. Freud's views have permeated popular culture, are often controversial, and sometimes misunderstood. This course explores Freud's views and the psychoanalytic approach. We will also study some of the theories developed by Freud's students as they rejected or modified aspects of Freudian psychoanalysis, ultimately leading up to what is now called psychodynamic psychology. Along with discussing psycho-analytic theory itself, we will be paying special attention the historical and cultural context in which they developed.
Taught in Bregenz (Austria) by Prof. Thomas Reece.

PSY 299-2 Topics: The Social Psychology of Evil: Psychology and the Holocaust (3 hours)
The Holocaust was one of the great tragedies of the modern era and one question that is still asked today is "How could people commit such atrocities?" This class seeks to answer that very question and explore how normal people can do terrible things. We will talk about effect of authority and the forces that drive us to obey, the urge to conform, the power of out-groups and the dehumanization of the other. We will also examine the factors that affected those few who risked their lives to protect their neighbors, or complete strangers, from the Nazi regime. By the end of this class, we will have a better understanding of the psychology that drove this period in history, compare it to atrocities that have happened since then, and hopefully, be in a better position to prevent similar horrors in the future.
Taught in Bregenz (Austria) by Prof. Thomas Reece.

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Public Health
HCA 347 International Comparisons of Health Care Systems: Comparative Health Systems (3 hours)
Graduate credit available
This course examines both global health issues and health systems from a comparative perspective. This course will begin by discussing global health themes, including: international health organizations, right to health, access to medicines, significant international health issues, women's health, children's health, and the environment and health. We will define "health systems" and explore what they do and how they have evolved. We will focus on understanding the configuration of health systems, examining different frameworks for healthcare delivery, financing, coverage, and allocation of resources. Students will also learn about select health care systems around the globe and review the structure and functioning of their health systems. Country-level debates on issues such as access to care and funding will be explored as well as how a country's history has influenced the development of its health system. Taught in Tanzania by Dr. Monika Sawhney.

HCA 459 / HCA 459G Global Health Service-Learning Practicum (3-6 hours) Graduate credit available
The Global Health Service-Learning (GHSL) practicum opens doors for both undergraduate and graduate students in health professions such as medicine, nursing, nutrition, social work, and health administration to apply their skills alongside their Tanzanian counterparts while serving the health needs of the community. Key populations targeted by the program include the youth, HIV/AIDS patients, orphans, and a university community. The GHSL practicum can also be taken as an internship for students in health-related majors. Taught in Tanzania by Dr. William Mkanta.

PH 464/NURS 317-2 Women's Health: Women's Health in Tanzania (3 hours) Graduate credit available
A survey of the status of women's health in Tanzania. We will look at women's health throughout the lifespan, how it is affected by cultural, religious and socioeconomic factors (such as sexual discrimination and the use of traditional healers). We examine selected health problems which are particular for Tanzanian women such as female circumcision, high fertility rate, high maternal mortality, low contraceptive use and domestic violence. This course utilizes a holistic perspective and will be coordinated with visits to hospitals, clinics, and meetings with doctors and nurses and other health professionals. Seminar/discussion format with journaling and written reflections of experiences are used as classroom techniques. Students will present on a variety of topics relevant to the course and based on experiences in the field. Taught in Tanzania by Prof. Adele Dean.

PH 469/EDU 400-2 Critical Issues in Health and Safety: Pura Vida: Costa Rica's Approach to Health & Wellness
The program is designed to increase students' appreciation of cultural influences within the framework of policies and practices impacting health and well-being, social justice and sustainable environmental, health and community development issues in Costa Rica. Topics will include the role of environmental policy and sustainable development in Costa Rica; Costa Rica's eco-tourism industry; the Costa Rican universal health care system and the rapidly emerging medical tourism industry; international human rights issues; and special government programs defending the rights of children and providing employment and English language training to youth. Learning activities will include presentations by national and international experts, tours of programs and facilities, roundtable discussions, student led presentations, cultural immersion, and visits to national parks. Taught in Costa Rica by Dr. Kristin Cook.

PH 469-2 Critical Issues in Health and Safety: Global Health (3 hours) or
PH 585 Global Health (3 hours) Graduate Course Option

The course will introduce students to the main concepts of the public health field and the critical links between global health and social and economic development. Students will get an overview of the determinants of health, and how health status is measured, and students will also review the burden of disease, risk factors, and key measures to address the burden of disease in cost-effective ways. The course will cover key concepts and frameworks that are very practical in orientation. The course will be global in coverage but with an important focus on the developing world and on the health of the poor. Taught in Tanzania by Dr. Monika Sawhney.

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Religious Studies
RELS 399/HIST 490-1 Study Abroad: The Holocaust in History and Memory (3 hours)
The Holocaust, the Nazi's systematic murder of nearly six million Jews and millions of others considered to be racially inferior or enemies of the state, is a defining event of the twentieth century. Drawing on a number of disciplines—including history, religion, sociology, psychology—we will attempt to deepen our understanding of the causes, course, and consequences of this world-shattering epoch. Reflection on the Holocaust will confront us with a host of questions about the nature of prejudice, responsibility, and power. The first half of the course will focus on the historical background and context of the Holocaust. The second half will be devoted a multidisciplinary exploration of the motives and actions of perpetrators, victims, bystanders, and rescuers, as well as consideration the Holocaust's continuing presence and impact on European society. We will pay special attention to events in Berlin. Taught in Berlin by Dr. Steve Gowler

RELS 399-2/ENG 396 Study Abroad: Greek Myth in Context (3 hours) Honors credit available
No stories contain greater richness and depth and none have been more influential than those we call "Greek myths." In this class students learn important ancient Greek tales while visiting sites in which many of these myths are said to have taken place—Athens, Eleusis, Delos, Delphi, Argos, and Mycenae. Meanwhile, students learn to read these tales as represented in Greek art—on vases and in sculpture that we view. Note: any student with a 3.2 GPA or above can enroll in this course for Honors credit. Students enrolled for Honors credit will have more challenging and unconventional assignments that will require greater analytical, creative, and critical thinking skills. Taught in Greece by Dr. Richard King.

RELS 399-3 Study Abroad: Paul's Greek Influence on Early Christianity (3 hours)
This interdisciplinary course surveys Primary and Secondary sources involving St. Paul's Greek influence on early Christianity. Readings include samplings from the New Testament, such as the Corinthian Epistles, as well as secondary scholarly appraisals of the Pauline corpus. Greek culture in the Hellenistic and Roman periods will also be a focus of study. The course explores the interplay of cultures—Jewish, Roman and Greek—as Paul carried Christianity into Asia Minor and Greece. This course is interdisciplinary and will include art, architecture, sculpture, iconography and mosaics and well as archaeological evidence of the subjects at hand. Taught in Greece by Prof. Steven Watkins.

RELS 399-4 Study Abroad: The History of the Bible: The Canonical New Testament from Greek to English (3 hours)
This interdisciplinary course traces the process which led to the establishment of the Greek New Testament. We will examine where the early Greek documents were found as well as some introductory material on the language and people who contributed to its formation. We will look at religious and political concerns such as the church fathers and councils that eventually led to the forming of the New Testament canon. The travel itinerary includes historic sites of involving the origins of some New Testament documents—especially Corinth and Athens. Students will be introduced to textual criticism, Koine Greek, geography of the text families, and biographical and historical details relating to the New Testament from early texts to English translations. Students do not need to know Koine Greek. Taught in Greece by Prof. Steven Watkins.

RELS 399-5 Islamic Spirituality: Mystics, Masochists, and Musicians (3 hours)
Throughout the history of Islam, many Muslims have organized their religious experiences around a mystical journey of love and devotion that brings them closer to God. This course explores the rich tradition of Islamic spirituality, often known as Sufism. We will spend significant time examining various strains of Sufism and looking at mystical practices ranging from masochistic medieval rituals to contemporary trance music. Turkey has long been a central location for a number of mystical traditions, and we will visit various Sufi centers in Istanbul to encounter this vibrant tradition in person.
Taught in Istanbul by Dr. Matthew Pierce.

RELS 399-6 The Legacy of an Empire: Memories of the Sacred and Secular in Modern Istanbul (3 hours)
During the last century, Istanbul has transformed from capital of the great Ottoman Empire to modern-day gateway between Europe and Asia. As such, it's an ideal place to study the way history can be used to support religious and political visions for society's future. In this course, we will explore the way specific memories serve to create meaning for religious and secular communities. We will begin with a memoir by Nobel Prize-winning author Orhan Pamuk, Istanbul. As we explore Pamuk's reflections on the complexities of Istanbul, we'll visit many of the neighborhoods he discusses. Our focus, however, will be on the religious motivations and political implications of memory. This course is designed to familiarize students with Istanbul's rich legacy while grappling with the socially-contested nature of public memory using key concepts from the theory of religion. Taught in Istanbul by Dr. Matthew Pierce.

RELS 399-7 Study Abroad: Introduction to Japanese Religions (3 hours)
This course offers an introduction to the ideas, institutions, and practices of Japan's principal religious traditions: Buddhism, Confucianism, and Shinto. Through analysis of scriptural texts and short works of literature (in English translation), religious art and architecture, and ritual practices, students will develop a basic understanding of the unity and diversity of traditional religions in Japan. To the extent permitted by the circumstances of the program, visits to cultural and historical sites also will inform learning in the course. Taught in Japan by Dr. Jeffrey Richey.

RELS 399-8/ARC 401 Study Abroad: Religion in Japanese Literature (3 hours)
This course offers an introduction to traditional Japanese religious culture as expressed, appropriated, and adapted by Japanese authors from antiquity to the present. Through analysis of diaries, dramas, novels, poems, and short stories (in English translation), students will develop a basic understanding of Japanese religious ideas, institutions, and practices. To the extent permitted by the circumstances of the program, works of cinema and live theatrical performances also will inform learning in the course. Taught in Japan by Dr. Jeffrey Richey.

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Sociology
SOCL 489/ICSR 301-3 Sociology Study Abroad: Sociology of Sustainability (3 hours)
The aim of this course is to cultivate 'ecological literacy'—a quality of mind that seeks out the connections among human and natural systems. The course demonstrates the inextricable interconnectedness of economic, political, social, and ecological systems. Students are encouraged to develop a critical, contextualized, and reflective attitude, as well as recognize the ramifications of personal decisions in the broader context of an ecological balance. The course is structured around the comparative perspective. We will contrast attitudes about sustainability in the United States, and the Czech Republic, and examine the cultural forces that shaped them. We explore aspects of the economic and political structure, specifically the context of EU regulations and directives that shape policy choices and impact sustainable outcomes.
Taught in Prague by Prof. Marketa Cawood.

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Spanish
SPAN 105 Introduction to Hispanic Culture (3 hours)
Survey of the contemporary values of Spain and Latin America, with emphasis on values, behavioral characteristics, social and political structures, and achievements of the Spanish-speaking peoples.
Taught in English in Spain-May by Prof. Ninfa Floyd.

SPAN 210 Intermediate Spanish Conversation Abroad (3 hours)
Reviews and reinforces the basic fundamentals of Spanish language mechanics from earlier levels, such as agreement, spelling, and punctuation. Students are asked to write a series of short compositions that reinforce grammar covered in the course and describe the experiences they are having in Mexico. In addition to writing mechanics, much attention is given to increasing Spanish vocabulary and strategies for doing so. As we will be in Mexico, this course also addresses what makes Mexican Spanish different from other Spanish dialects. Taught in Spanish in Mexico by a local instructor.

SPAN 211 Intermediate Spanish Culture Abroad (3 hours)
This course offers a basic yet extensive survey of the history of Mexico. We learn how Mexico's rich history led the country to where it is now culturally, politically, economically and linguistically. We discuss the many contemporary cultures that exist throughout the country and consider their differences and similarities. Special attention is given to the influence of indigenous languages on the Spanish spoken in Mexico. Field trips are taken to archeological sites and other important points of interest to reinforce and bring to life what is learned in class. Taught in Spanish in Mexico by a local instructor.

SPAN 306-1 Experiencing Spanish Abroad: Service Learning (3 hours)
An introduction to Cuban culture through a hands-on approach with an emphasis on volunteerism. The course includes a service-learning component that will allow students to utilize their language skills to help those in the surrounding community while also gaining cultural knowledge. Taught in Spanish in Cuba by Dr. Kajsa Larson.

SPAN 306-2 Experiencing Spanish Abroad: Literary Segovia (3 hours)
An architectural and literary tour of Segovia as constructed by and onto the imaginations of Spanish-language writers from Cervantes and the Plaza de Azoguejo to Machado and the Casa-Museo de Antonio Machado.
Taught in Spanish in Spain I by Prof. Melissa Groenewold.

SPAN 306-3 Experiencing Spanish Abroad: Phonetics and Pronunciation (3 hours)
An introduction to the study of Spanish phonetics with emphasis on practical exercises for improving students' pronunciation of Spanish. The course includes a study of the sounds and dialects of Spanish, contrasted with those of the students' native language. Taught in Spanish in Spain by Dr. Nelson Lopez.

SPAN 306-4 Experiencing Spanish Abroad: Spanish Cinema (3 hours)
An introduction to the cinematic productions of the most important Spanish directors and their works in the context of Spanish History, society, culture and politics. Taught in Spanish in Spain I by Dr. Slav Gratchev.

SPAN 370-1 Spanish Conversation (3 hours) or
SPAN 470-1 Advanced Oral Spanish (3 hours)

Helps students improve their oral communication skills in Spanish in order to communicate at an intermediate-high level. Students will discuss readings and deliver brief presentations to their peers about current issues, short fictional pieces, and cultural excursions. The course develops students' ability to communicate complex opinions and ideas in Spanish and increases their awareness about cultural characteristics of the Spanish-speaking world.
Taught in Spanish in Cuba by Dr. Kajsa Larson.

SPAN 370-2 Spanish Conversation (3 hours)
A course designed to practice and exercise pronunciation, comprehension and oral expression abroad. Emphasis is placed on bringing the student into contact with Spain's historical background and culture through interaction with native speakers and informal visits to places of interest such as shops, parks, monuments, etc.
Taught in Spanish in Spain I by Dr. Slav Grachev and by Prof. Melissa Groenewold.

SPAN 370-3 Spanish Conversation (3 hours)
A course designed to practice and exercise pronunciation, comprehension and oral expression abroad. Emphasis is placed on bringing the student into contact with Mexico's historical background and culture through interaction with native speakers and informal visits to places of interest such as shops, parks, monuments, etc.
Taught in Spanish in Mexico by Dr. Itza Zavala-Garrett.

SPAN 373 Spanish Civilization and Culture (3 hours)
Survey of historical and cultural background of Spain and its people from the Roman colonization to the present. The topics are organized around a series of themes including religion, history, politics, regionalism, demography, art and architecture. The course addresses the complex historical, political and cultural identities of Spain in order to understand the country in the twenty-first century. Taught in Spanish in Spain II by Dr. Melissa Stewart and Dr. Inma Pertusa.

SPAN 376 Literature and Culture of Latin America (3 hours)
Taught in Spanish, this class is in every way an immersion course in Latin American culture. As we travel throughout several different regions of Costa Rica, students learn about Latin American dance, music, and film, while developing a greater understanding of the political and socioeconomic factors that led to their production. We consider local responses to globalization and environmentalism as we visit farms, markets, ports, and multinational corporations. We critically analyze sustainability initiatives such as Eco-tourism and agricultural cooperatives. We learn from local guest speakers about inequality, corruption, and rigid class structures and how creative people work to turn challenges into opportunities. We also consider the rich cultural diversity of rural Costa Rica, exploring Afro-Caribbean and indigenous communities. This is a discussion-based, problem-solving, seminar-style class.
Taught in Spanish in Costa Rica by Dr. Genny Ballard.

SPAN 455-1 Topics: Introduction to Spanish Translation (3 hours)
Costa Rica is one of the most popular tourist destinations in Central America and is visited by tens of thousands of English-speaking tourists each year who read translated brochures and flyers during their visit. The goal of this course is to improve each student's mastery of the Spanish language through the execution of translation tasks while also deepening students' understanding of and appreciation for the Costa Rican culture via service learning. The primary goal is indeed linguistic and skill-related, but cultural issues will also be addressed as they arise in the source texts students translate and analyze. That is, while students carefully work translating authentic texts as a service to the local population, they will be forced to improve their mastery of Spanish, enlarge their vocabulary, and enrich their understanding of Costa Rica and its people. Taught in Spanish in Costa Rica by Dr. Alan Brown.

SPAN 455-2 Topics: Envisioning Modern Cuba (3 hours)
This course orients students to modern Cuba by way of readings and discussions relating to such cultural topics as slavery, the sugar industry, the Revolution of 1959, the U.S. trade embargo, and others. Tentative field trips include the Museum of the Revolution, the Museum of the Literacy Campaign, Old Havana, the Fort of Havana, and a functioning ingenio (sugar mill). Students are expected to choose an area of cultural interest and conduct interviews with local Cubans to gather information for a final 5-minute presentation in Spanish. Prerequisite: SPAN 202 or equivalent and permission of instructor. Taught in Spanish in Cuba by Dr. Richard Morris.

SPAN 455-3 Topics: Spanish Female Detective Fiction and Film (3 hours)
An introduction to the crime novel, written and protagonized by women in Spain.
Taught in Spanish in Spain II by Dr. Inma Pertusa.

SPAN 455-4 Topics: Spanish Phonetics (3 hours)
In this class, students will study the sound patterns of Spanish and work on improving their own pronunciation. Through analysis, imitation, and practice, students will be able to identify major differences and similarities between the sound systems of North American English and Spanish. An important component of the course is speech analysis exercises in which students will go out into the community and transcribe and analyze short speech recordings of their host family and local community members. Students will also make and analyze pre- and post-term recordings of their own speech. Finally, as students interact with the local community, they will learn salient pronunciation features characteristic of the Peninsular Spanish as compared to other varieties of Spanish in Latin America. Taught in Spanish in Spain II by Dr. Chin-Sook Pak.

SPAN 470 Advanced Oral Spanish (3 hours)
In order to develop greater oral fluency, the course will emphasize 1) vocabulary building, 2) intensive review of problematic areas of Spanish grammar for native speakers of English, and 3) meaningful communicative tasks in the community on a variety of cultural, social, economic, and political topics. Students will examine the usage of certain vocabulary and several grammatical concepts (e.g., the subjunctive). They will engage in regular reading of authentic texts and speaking activities that include discussions and interviewing the host family members and exploring the local community. In particular, groups of students will design a variety of interview/survey questions for the community on relevant topics and report their findings to the class. Students will also keep journals on cultural encounters and share their reflections.
Taught in Spanish in Spain II by Dr. Chin-Sook Pak.
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Swahili
SWAH 101: Elementary Swahili (3 hours)
An introduction to the Swahili language and Kiswahili-speaking culture for students with little or no previous language study. Kiswahili (Swahili) is the national language of Tanzania; however, Kiswahili is not just a language, it is a national culture and continues to play an important role in shaping the culture, economy, people, and politics of Tanzania. A basic knowledge of Swahili is also meant to provide students with a better contextual understanding of the Tanzania program's other courses. Taught in Tanzania by a Local Instructor.

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Theatre
THEA 375/ENG 399-1 Topics in Drama: Classical Greek Comedy (3 hours) Graduate or Honors credit available
After discussing Comedy as defined by Aristotle's Poetics, students compare and contrast the bawdy, satirical, chorus-based Old Comedy of 5th century BC Greece with the realistic, moralistic, character-based New Comedy of the 4th century BC. While studying Aristophanes and Menander, students become acquainted with the evolution of style and content as connected to the writers' social and political environment, as well as their influence on contemporary comedy. Such themes as education, politics, war, families, mistaken identity, and love gained/lost/gained again are examined.
Taught in Greece by Dr. Paul Ranieri.

PERF 461-1 Performing Arts Practicum III (3-6 credits)
The KIIS Montreal internship provides students with a personalized experience in drama, theater or dance at the top Jewish theater in Montreal. It is designed to give students the chance to gain real world experience in their field of choice (with the exception of acting). Interns focus on design (set, lighting, costumes), stage and sound management, production management, and marketing/public relations. Interns will work on the theatre's current plays along with the rest of the theater team. Students have the option of earning three credit hours in one month or six credit hours in two months. Students must indicate on their applications the track and time period they wish to study.
Contact Prof. Eddy Cuisinier for more information.

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