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 Courses are taught in English, unless noted.
 Courses are 3 credit hours each, unless noted.

Anthropology
ANTH 366 Topics: Peoples and Cultures of Mexico (3 hours)
This course explores the intersections of Maya ethnicity and gender with tourism. Employing anthropological fieldwork methods such as participant observation and interviews, we learn about the varied ways people understand being Maya (and Mexican). In particular, we examine how gender dynamics have evolved from the past to present and how gender makes a difference to Maya cultural identity. We also consider how the expectations of tourists positively and problematically influence the politics of Maya ethnicity and gender. We employ a "Place as Text" teaching methodology, which inserts students into social environments and fosters close observation of the local culture. Students are required to give oral reports, record their observations and reflections, and complete a final (creative) project. Multiple professors bring their disciplinary perspectives to bear on common questions and concerns. Taught in Maya Mexico Winter by Dr. Andrea Abrams.

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Art
ART 491 Topics: Italian Decorative Art and Design (3 hours)
Like magicians with art materials, artists & designers have long used visual tricks to fool the viewer's eye. Solid stone statues appear to breathe air and capture the essence of energetic movement. Flat paintings seem like they open into another dimension or are rendered so realistically that they tempt the senses. For this course students will examine the history, purpose, and application of illusionistic deception in Italian art and design through countless visits to museums, churches, galleries and historic sites. We will investigate, emulate and photograph images as they are displayed in excursion sites. Assignments will consist of creating a research photo-archive, as well as attempting to recreate images using basic art techniques. A digital camera is required (some camera phones will work fine) and students must purchase art materials either prior to departure or upon arrival in Italy. This art course is open to all majors and there are no prerequisites in order to enroll. Taught in Italy Winter by Prof. Ian Hagarty .

ART 496 Topics: Digital Photography (3 hours)
Students will visit places of interest in Florence, Rome and surroundings. They will learn how to use their digital SLR camera and imaging software, preferably Adobe Photoshop, to enhance their photographic images and videos. Students enrolled in this course need to bring a laptop equipped with imaging software (details will be provided at the November 2018 KIIS Student Orientation). Taught in Italy by Prof. Randy Simmons.

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English
ENG 396 Mythology / RELS 399 Topics: Ancient Myth in Context (3 hours)
Myth: Much like modern America, Rome was a melting pot of cultural influences: they had native gods and myths of their own, they adopted Greek gods and mythology more or less wholesale, and they even imported gods and myths from the peoples they conquered. This course will survey many of the gods and myths that filled the ancient Roman mental landscape while introducing students to the history and culture of ancient Rome and Italy. Especially in Florence, it will also show the lasting influence of Greek and Roman mythology on the great works of Renaissance art. Taught in Italy by Dr. Richard King.

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Geography
GEOG 452 Applied Geoscience Field Experience: Florence and Rome, Then and Now (3 hours)
Etruscan and Roman architects sculpted the face of Italy, starting over 2,000 years ago, and their influences live on in the cultural landscape of Florence and Rome. Every corner holds remnants of the past to be explored. These cosmopolitan centers evolved as sea access gave them resources and ideas from around the world. Visualize the local and global infrastructure impacts through the five themes of geography: movement, place, location, region and human-environment interaction. The lasting imprint of Etruscan and Roman culture will be experienced through the Italian landscape. Taught in Italy by Dr. Jill Brown.

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Health Care Administration/Public Health
HCA 347-572 Special Topics: Comparative Health Systems (3 hours) Graduate credit available
This course is designed to provide students in health administration and other administrative disciplines with an opportunity to learn about the Tanzanian healthcare system, especially on how different aspects of the system are organized and managed. It will integrate student knowledge and skills in management/administration with practical applications in the Tanzanian/African context while working alongside their local counterparts. It is expected that upon successful completion of the program, students will be able to compare different aspects of care delivery and management between Tanzania and United States. Team taught in Zanzibar Winter by Dr. William Mkanta and Dr. Geela Spira.

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History
HIST 490 Topics: Day to Day in Ancient Italy (3 hours)
What did the ancients wear? eat? hate? love? How did they spend their days and nights? How did they survive without the car, movies, texting? How did they make their money? What did they think about the good life, death, politics, sex? Why do we care? This course explores the ordinary lives of ancient Romans- and of the Italians, Greeks, Jews, and Christians who lived near them- as we wander their towns and poke our noses into what remains of their homes, temples, stores, streets. Taught in Italy Winter by Dr. Chris Shea.

HIST 490 Topics: Markets, Memory and Murals in Mexico (3 hours)
This interdisciplinary course examines the history and culture of Mexico in three dimensions. In the Yucatan and Mexico City, we will explore Mayan, Teotihuacan, and Mexica living built environments and symbolic spaces, walk various archeological and historical sites, and assess these civilizations as we see them. The course will orient students to Mexican environmental and urban history, and enable students hands-on, exploration, observation, and analysis of the built environment. We employ a "Place as Text" teaching methodology, which inserts students into social environments and fosters close observation of the local culture. Students are required to give oral reports, record their observations and reflections, and complete a final (creative) project. Multiple professors bring their disciplinary perspectives to bear on common questions and concerns. Taught in Maya Mexico Winter by Dr. Luis Sierra.

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Hospitality Management and Dietetics
HMD 476: Global Cuisine (3 hours)
World cuisines are derived from a convergence of geographic, historical, religious, climate and economic issues. Knowledge of world cuisines will broaden the mind and palate by focusing on cultures, customs, traditional foods and cooking techniques. We will identify the meaning and significance of food in different cultures by experiencing and exploring foods from different countries. Experiences will facilitate discussion and assist students in relating personal experiences to world and cultural issues, evaluate the religious, historical, regional, and economic impacts on the cuisines of the world, cultural history and diversity. The study abroad iteration of the Global Cuisine will explore the cuisines, customs, and culture of Germany and France, with particular attention to the grand cities of Munich and Paris. Taught in Paris-Munich Winter by Prof. Julie Lee.

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Honors
HON 300 Topics: Ancient and Modern Mexico (3 hours)
This interdisciplinary course examines Mexican society and culture in the historical past and living present. We visit archeological sites and learn about ancient Mexican (e.g. Maya, Aztec and Teotihuacan) social systems, religious beliefs, and cultural practices. We also consider modern Mexican society in urban and rural settings. Students contend with the contemporary dynamics of regional and national identity, tourism and economic development, and politics and social change. We employ a "Place as Text" teaching methodology, which inserts students into social environments and fosters close observation of the local culture. Students are required to give oral reports, record their observations and reflections, and complete a final (creative) project. Multiple professors bring their disciplinary perspectives to bear on common questions and concerns. Taught in Maya Mexico Winter by Dr. John Dizgun.

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Interdisciplinary Studies
IDST 350 Topics: Cuisine and Culture in Paris & Munich (3 hours)
This interdisciplinary, English-language course will not only demonstrate how food is an integral part of France and Germany while showcasing their respective cultures, it will also contextualize American eating habits, gastronomic traditions, and the current trends that are shaping the food scene in the United States. At the most basic level, students will become more aware of similarities and differences between American and European culture; at a deeper level they will examine how American eating habits have been influenced by the immigrant experience and pivotal world events such as war, natural disaster, financial boom, and economic depression. Participants in such a program will also have the chance to explore global topics that include social justice, sustainability, famine, waste, food literacy, genetically modified organisms, the rise of the fast food nation, and the slow food movement. In learning about the food and traditions of these two countries in the heart of Europe, students will also gain a deeper comprehension of European culture in general while at the same time coming to better understand the modern and historical foods of the United States. Although topic-specific readings, in-class assignments, and research-centered projects will provide the framework for an integral portion of such a course, the bulk of student learning will arise from experiential knowledge gained from guided tours, hands-on activities, directed excursions, and site visits in the host countries. Team taught in Paris-Munich Winter by Prof. Eddy Cuisinier and Prof. David Dominé.

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Psychology
PSY 299 Topics: Psychology of Aggression in Historic Italy (3 hours)
Italy is a country of rich and storied history. Travel in Rome and Florence will provide unique opportunities for the study of the psychology of human aggression. This class will explore forces driving people to dehumanize others, conform to cultural/societal pressure, and even to self-injure and somaticize. We will examine the psychology behind multiple examples of violence in the Ancient Roman Coliseum, will explore themes of art and aggression (including Caravaggio), and will gain an understanding of psychological factors in the macabre art, lives, and stigmata of Capuchin Monks. Taught in Italy by Dr. Myra Beth Bundy.

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Spanish
SPAN 306 Experiencing Spanish Abroad: Mexican Culture and Identity (3 hours)
This interdisciplinary course requires all coursework to be done in Spanish. The course examines the complexity of Mexican heritage by studying works of literature, art from the muralismo mexicano movement, and important historical figures from the country's history. We conduct on-site observation and analysis of archaeological sites and learn about ancient Mexican (e.g. Maya, Aztec, and Teotihuacan) social systems, religious beliefs, and cultural practices. Students consider the competing tensions throughout Mexico's history that have influenced regional and national identity, including the impact of tourism, economics, politics, and social change. We employ a "Place as Text" teaching methodology, which inserts students into social environments and fosters close observation of the local culture. Students are required to give oral reports, record their observations and reflections, and complete a final (creative) project. Multiple professors bring their disciplinary perspectives to bear on common questions and concerns. Taught in Maya Mexico Winter by Dr. Laura Hunt.

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Religious Studies
RELS 399 /ENG 396 Topics: Ancient Myth in Context (3 hours)
Myth: Much like modern America, Rome was a melting pot of cultural influences: they had native gods and myths of their own, they adopted Greek gods and mythology more or less wholesale, and they even imported gods and myths from the peoples they conquered. This course will survey many of the gods and myths that filled the ancient Roman mental landscape while introducing students to the history and culture of ancient Rome and Italy. Especially in Florence, it will also show the lasting influence of Greek and Roman mythology on the great works of Renaissance art. Taught in Italy Winter by Dr. Richard King.

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KIIS--Western Kentucky University / 1906 College Heights Blvd #11030 / Bowling Green, KY 42101-1030 / Tel. 270-745-4416 / Fax. 270-745-4413 / kiis@wku.edu / www.kiis.org