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 Courses are taught in English, unless noted.
 Courses are 3 credit hours each, unless noted.

Art
ART 491 / THEA 424: Decorative Painting for the Designer & Artist (3 hours)
This cross-listed course will have two components; 1) to view and research extant images of trompe l'oeil as they exist in Italian museums, galleries churches and historical sites and in their context as decorative images and 2) to develop the basic skills to recreate similar images using available techniques (watercolor, pencil, pastel, etc.) employed by theatre designers and visual artists. Class sessions and excursions will be used to investigate and photograph images as they are displayed in excursion sites and assignments will consist of creating a research photo-archive as well as recreating images using art techniques. Students must purchase art supplies either pre-travel or on site and must bring a digital camera. Taught in Italy (Winter) by Prof. Ian Hagarty and Prof. Shan Ayers.

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Business Administration
BA 592 Topics: Business Analysis for Management (3 hours) for MBA/MPA Students
This course provides a framework for using models in support of decision-making in an enterprise. Some of the commonly used modeling approaches and principles are introduced. Topics covered include general modeling concepts, spreadsheet modeling, simulation, forecasting, quality management, statistical process control, and decision analysis. The course emphasizes hands-on application of the techniques using commonly available software, and demonstrates the value of these approaches in a variety of functional settings in direct cooperation with the Zanzibar National Chamber of Commerce Industry and Agriculture (ZNCCIA) and the Tanzania Chamber of Commerce Industry and Agriculture (TCCIA) on real business problems. Taught in Executives in Zanzibar (Winter) by Dr. Philip Seagraves.

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Communication
COMM 400 Topics: Maya Mexico, Past & Present (3 hours)
Open to Honors and non-Honors students with a 3.2 GPA and above, this Winter term study abroad program introduces participants to the splendor of Mayan civilization and the present-day challenges facing the people of Mayan descent who reside in Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula. Students gain an appreciation of the agricultural, political, religious, and cultural achievements of the historic Maya at Chichen Itza, Uxmal, Calakmul, and Tulum; at the same time, they grapple with the contemporary dynamics of regional and national identity, tourism and development, and social, political, and environmental change.

Interdisciplinary in nature, the Winter 2016-2017 KIIS Maya Mexico study-abroad program employs a Place-as-Text approach, which makes use of five basic learning strategies: mapping, observing, listening, discussing, and reflecting. The goal is for students to take an active role in the direction of their learning by:

 Self-selecting course topics and readings (from among selections provided by professors at orientation) that most interest them;
 Dedicating themselves before and during the program to become “student-experts” in their chosen field;
 Providing faculty ahead of departure with a list of three questions that they regard as the crux of their self-selected topic and readings;
 Participating in small group excursions that (safely) place them in culturally and geographically uncomfortable situations;
 In pairs, leading seminar-style class discussions on their chosen topic, including fielding questions from classmates and professors;
 Synthesizing readings, observations, and class discussions in short papers submitted to the faculty.

In addition to acquiring knowledge of Mayan society, past and present, students learn to work effectively in small groups, improve their oral presentation and analytical skills, and develop a heightened sense of confidence and leadership. On average, there are 3.5 hours of instruction per day, in the form of excursions, seminars, and debriefings, for a total of 38.5 contact hours. Seminars and debriefings will be held in designated class space at our hotels (e.g. a small conference room) and at excursion sites (e.g. in a shaded area at a given Mayan site). No Spanish language is required.

Team taught in Maya Mexico (Winter) by Dr. John Dizgun, Dr. Alyssa Eckman, and Dr. Laura Hunt.

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English
ENG 396 Mythology / RELS 399 Topics: Ancient Myth in Context (3 hours)
Myth: Much like modern America, Rome was a melting pot of cultural influences: they had native gods and myths of their own, they adopted Greek gods and mythology more or less wholesale, and they even imported gods and myths from the peoples they conquered. This course will survey many of the gods and myths that filled the ancient Roman mental landscape while introducing students to the history and culture of ancient Rome and Italy. Especially in Florence, it will also show the lasting influence of Greek and Roman mythology on the great works of Renaissance art. Taught in Italy (Winter) by Dr. John Henkel.

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Gender & Women's Studies
GWS 470 Topics: Sexuality and Society in the Ancient World (3 hours)
What is the relationship between psychology and Christianity? Both psychology and Christianity explore the existential questions of man: where did I come from, who am I, what is my purpose, and where am I going. Psychology and Christianity are also examples of enculturation within societies. Rome is the seat of Christianity and affords students the opportunity to study in an environment rich in historical theological tradition. Rome is a beautiful example of enculturation with the many frescos in public places, the Vatican, Sistine Chapel, and the Vatican Museum. Rome is also an excellent example of Christianity co-existing with non-Christian or post-Christian cultures and offers many ancient sites in which to discuss this co-existence. Visiting Rome will allow the student to also experience the ways in which the Vatican interacts with modern Roman society. A journey to the Tuscan city of Florence affords the student another beautiful environment from which to study the relationship between psychology and Christianity. Florence was one of the preeminent Renaissance cities in Italy. The students will be able to visit sites in Florence associated with many Florentines associated with scientific developments: Leonardo da Vinci, Copernicus, and Galileo. The relationship between Christianity and the culture at large is beautifully manifested in the great cathedrals in Florence. Taught in Italy (Winter) by Dr. Richard King.

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Geography
GEOG 475 Topics: Maya Mexico, Past & Present (3 hours)
Open to Honors and non-Honors students with a 3.2 GPA and above, this Winter term study abroad program introduces participants to the splendor of Mayan civilization and the present-day challenges facing the people of Mayan descent who reside in Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula. Students gain an appreciation of the agricultural, political, religious, and cultural achievements of the historic Maya at Chichen Itza, Uxmal, Calakmul, and Tulum; at the same time, they grapple with the contemporary dynamics of regional and national identity, tourism and development, and social, political, and environmental change.

Interdisciplinary in nature, the Winter 2016-2017 KIIS Maya Mexico study-abroad program employs a Place-as-Text approach, which makes use of five basic learning strategies: mapping, observing, listening, discussing, and reflecting. The goal is for students to take an active role in the direction of their learning by:

 Self-selecting course topics and readings (from among selections provided by professors at orientation) that most interest them;
 Dedicating themselves before and during the program to become “student-experts” in their chosen field;
 Providing faculty ahead of departure with a list of three questions that they regard as the crux of their self-selected topic and readings;
 Participating in small group excursions that (safely) place them in culturally and geographically uncomfortable situations;
 In pairs, leading seminar-style class discussions on their chosen topic, including fielding questions from classmates and professors;
 Synthesizing readings, observations, and class discussions in short papers submitted to the faculty.

In addition to acquiring knowledge of Mayan society, past and present, students learn to work effectively in small groups, improve their oral presentation and analytical skills, and develop a heightened sense of confidence and leadership. On average, there are 3.5 hours of instruction per day, in the form of excursions, seminars, and debriefings, for a total of 38.5 contact hours. Seminars and debriefings will be held in designated class space at our hotels (e.g. a small conference room) and at excursion sites (e.g. in a shaded area at a given Mayan site). No Spanish language is required.

Team taught in Maya Mexico (Winter) by Dr. John Dizgun, Dr. Alyssa Eckman, and Dr. Laura Hunt.

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Graduate
A selection of study abroad courses (taught in English) is offered for graduate credit to students who have completed their undergraduate degree. For course descriptions, see corresponding undergraduate course in the specific subject area. If interested in additional Graduate course possibilities or offerings on KIIS programs, contact Maria Canning.

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Health Care Administration/Public Health
HCA 347/ HCA 572: Special Topics: Comparative Health Systems (3 hours)
This course is designed to offer executive students in MHA/MPA majors with knowledge and administrative experience of the Tanzanian healthcare system. In collaboration with the ministry of health (MOH) and its affiliates, the students will learn about the structure of the Tanzanian system in terms of financing, access and distribution of human resources and the growing role of the private sector in healthcare delivery. Collaborative and applied learning environments will be created where students will be teamed up with their Tanzanian counterparts in roundtable discussions and site visits to learn, compare and share experiences in health care. Field visits to Mnazi Mmoja Hospital (the largest public hospital in Zanzibar) and internationally funded health care projects will be made to facilitate assessment of care delivery and management practices. Taught in Executives in Zanzibar (Winter) by Dr. William Mkanta..

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History
HIST 490 Topics: Day to Day in Ancient Italy (3 hours) Graduate credit available
What did the ancients wear? eat? hate? love? How did they spend their days and nights? How did they survive without the car, movies, texting? How did they make their money? What did they think about the good life, death, politics, sex? Why do we care? This course explores the ordinary lives of ancient Romans- and of the Italians, Greeks, Jews, and Christians who lived near them- as we wander their towns and poke our noses into what remains of their homes, temples, stores, streets. Taught in Italy (Winter) by Dr. Chris Shea.

HIST 490 Topics: Medieval Italy - Popes, Emperors and Invaders (3 hours) Graduate credit available
Between the collapse of the Roman Empire (5th century) and the Italian Renaissance (14th century), Roman Popes, Byzantine Emperors and Germanic invaders struggled to control the Italian Peninsula. In this course, we will explore historical sites that symbolize this medieval struggle and the impact of these three cultures. We'll see the remains of the Roman Empire including the Forum, Colosseum, and the Pantheon. We examine how the Papacy adapted Roman architecture and how the Germanic invaders influenced the development of the Pope's power. In Florence, we'll explore the development of the Italian city-state and the historical architecture and art that financed the growth of Italian trade in the Middle Ages. Taught in Italy (Winter) by Dr. Cynthia Resor.

HIST 490 Topics: Maya Mexico, Past & Present (3 hours)
Open to Honors and non-Honors students with a 3.2 GPA and above, this Winter term study abroad program introduces participants to the splendor of Mayan civilization and the present-day challenges facing the people of Mayan descent who reside in Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula. Students gain an appreciation of the agricultural, political, religious, and cultural achievements of the historic Maya at Chichen Itza, Uxmal, Calakmul, and Tulum; at the same time, they grapple with the contemporary dynamics of regional and national identity, tourism and development, and social, political, and environmental change.

Interdisciplinary in nature, the Winter 2016-2017 KIIS Maya Mexico study-abroad program employs a Place-as-Text approach, which makes use of five basic learning strategies: mapping, observing, listening, discussing, and reflecting. The goal is for students to take an active role in the direction of their learning by:

 Self-selecting course topics and readings (from among selections provided by professors at orientation) that most interest them;
 Dedicating themselves before and during the program to become “student-experts” in their chosen field;
 Providing faculty ahead of departure with a list of three questions that they regard as the crux of their self-selected topic and readings;
 Participating in small group excursions that (safely) place them in culturally and geographically uncomfortable situations;
 In pairs, leading seminar-style class discussions on their chosen topic, including fielding questions from classmates and professors;
 Synthesizing readings, observations, and class discussions in short papers submitted to the faculty.

In addition to acquiring knowledge of Mayan society, past and present, students learn to work effectively in small groups, improve their oral presentation and analytical skills, and develop a heightened sense of confidence and leadership. On average, there are 3.5 hours of instruction per day, in the form of excursions, seminars, and debriefings, for a total of 38.5 contact hours. Seminars and debriefings will be held in designated class space at our hotels (e.g. a small conference room) and at excursion sites (e.g. in a shaded area at a given Mayan site). No Spanish language is required.

Team taught in Maya Mexico (Winter) by Dr. John Dizgun, Dr. Alyssa Eckman, and Dr. Laura Hunt.

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Honors
HON 300 Colloquium: Maya Mexico, Past & Present (3 hours)
Open to Honors and non-Honors students with a 3.2 GPA and above, this Winter term study abroad program introduces participants to the splendor of Mayan civilization and the present-day challenges facing the people of Mayan descent who reside in Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula. Students gain an appreciation of the agricultural, political, religious, and cultural achievements of the historic Maya at Chichen Itza, Uxmal, Calakmul, and Tulum; at the same time, they grapple with the contemporary dynamics of regional and national identity, tourism and development, and social, political, and environmental change.

Interdisciplinary in nature, the Winter 2016-2017 KIIS Maya Mexico study-abroad program employs a Place-as-Text approach, which makes use of five basic learning strategies: mapping, observing, listening, discussing, and reflecting. The goal is for students to take an active role in the direction of their learning by:

 Self-selecting course topics and readings (from among selections provided by professors at orientation) that most interest them;
 Dedicating themselves before and during the program to become “student-experts” in their chosen field;
 Providing faculty ahead of departure with a list of three questions that they regard as the crux of their self-selected topic and readings;
 Participating in small group excursions that (safely) place them in culturally and geographically uncomfortable situations;
 In pairs, leading seminar-style class discussions on their chosen topic, including fielding questions from classmates and professors;
 Synthesizing readings, observations, and class discussions in short papers submitted to the faculty.

In addition to acquiring knowledge of Mayan society, past and present, students learn to work effectively in small groups, improve their oral presentation and analytical skills, and develop a heightened sense of confidence and leadership. On average, there are 3.5 hours of instruction per day, in the form of excursions, seminars, and debriefings, for a total of 38.5 contact hours. Seminars and debriefings will be held in designated class space at our hotels (e.g. a small conference room) and at excursion sites (e.g. in a shaded area at a given Mayan site). No Spanish language is required.

Team taught in Maya Mexico (Winter) by Dr. John Dizgun, Dr. Alyssa Eckman, and Dr. Laura Hunt.

Any student with a 3.2 GPA or above can enroll in a course for Honors credit. Students enrolled for Honors credit will have more challenging and unconventional assignments that will require greater analytical, creative, and critical thinking skills. If interested in an Honors Augmentation on KIIS programs, contact Maria Canning.

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Internships & Service-Learning
Internships and Service-Learning may be available to undergraduates and graduates in the course following below. Additional international internships may be available. Contact the KIIS office at 270-745-4416 or kiis@wku.edu.
HCA 572 Topics: Public Health and Health Care Administration (3 hours) for MHA/MPA Student (undergraduate credit available)
This course is designed to offer executive students in MHA/MPA majors with knowledge and administrative experience of the Tanzanian healthcare system. In collaboration with the ministry of health (MOH) and its affiliates, the students will learn about the structure of the Tanzanian system in terms of financing, access and distribution of human resources and the growing role of the private sector in healthcare delivery. Collaborative and applied learning environments will be created where students will be teamed up with their Tanzanian counterparts in roundtable discussions and site visits to learn, compare and share experiences in health care. Field visits to Mnazi Mmoja Hospital (the largest public hospital in Zanzibar) and internationally funded health care projects will be made to facilitate assessment of care delivery and management practices. Taught in Executives in Zanzibar (Winter) by Dr. William Mkanta..

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Psychology
PSY 299 / RELS 399 Topics: Psychology and Christianity in Italy (3 hours)
What is the relationship between psychology and Christianity? Both psychology and Christianity explore the existential questions of man: where did I come from, who am I, what is my purpose, and where am I going. Psychology and Christianity are also examples of enculturation within societies. Rome is the seat of Christianity and affords students the opportunity to study in an environment rich in historical theological tradition. Rome is a beautiful example of enculturation with the many frescos in public places, the Vatican, Sistine Chapel, and the Vatican Museum. Rome is also an excellent example of Christianity co-existing with non-Christian or post-Christian cultures and offers many ancient sites in which to discuss this co-existence. Visiting Rome will allow the student to also experience the ways in which the Vatican interacts with modern Roman society. A journey to the Tuscan city of Florence affords the student another beautiful environment from which to study the relationship between psychology and Christianity. Florence was one of the preeminent Renaissance cities in Italy. The students will be able to visit sites in Florence associated with many Florentines associated with scientific developments: Leonardo da Vinci, Copernicus, and Galileo. The relationship between Christianity and the culture at large is beautifully manifested in the great cathedrals in Florence. Taught in Italy (Winter) by Dr. Kathleen O'Connor.

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Religious Studies
RELS 399 Topics: Ancient Myth in Context / ENG 396 Mythology (3 hours)
Myth: Much like modern America, Rome was a melting pot of cultural influences: they had native gods and myths of their own, they adopted Greek gods and mythology more or less wholesale, and they even imported gods and myths from the peoples they conquered. This course will survey many of the gods and myths that filled the ancient Roman mental landscape while introducing students to the history and culture of ancient Rome and Italy. Especially in Florence, it will also show the lasting influence of Greek and Roman mythology on the great works of Renaissance art. Taught in Italy (Winter) by Dr. John Henkel.

RELS 399 / PSY 299 Topics: Psychology and Christianity in Italy (3 hours)
What is the relationship between psychology and Christianity? Both psychology and Christianity explore the existential questions of man: where did I come from, who am I, what is my purpose, and where am I going. Psychology and Christianity are also examples of enculturation within societies. Rome is the seat of Christianity and affords students the opportunity to study in an environment rich in historical theological tradition. Rome is a beautiful example of enculturation with the many frescos in public places, the Vatican, Sistine Chapel, and the Vatican Museum. Rome is also an excellent example of Christianity co-existing with non-Christian or post-Christian cultures and offers many ancient sites in which to discuss this co-existence. Visiting Rome will allow the student to also experience the ways in which the Vatican interacts with modern Roman society. A journey to the Tuscan city of Florence affords the student another beautiful environment from which to study the relationship between psychology and Christianity. Florence was one of the preeminent Renaissance cities in Italy. The students will be able to visit sites in Florence associated with many Florentines associated with scientific developments: Leonardo da Vinci, Copernicus, and Galileo. The relationship between Christianity and the culture at large is beautifully manifested in the great cathedrals in Florence. Taught in Italy (Winter) by Dr. Kathleen O'Connor.

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Theatre
THEA 424 / ART 491 Topics: Decorative Painting for the Designer & Artist (3 hours)
This cross-listed course will have two components; 1) to view and research extant images of trompe l'oeil as they exist in Italian museums, galleries churches and historical sites and in their context as decorative images and 2) to develop the basic skills to recreate similar images using available techniques (watercolor, pencil, pastel, etc.) employed by theatre designers and visual artists. Class sessions and excursions will be used to investigate and photograph images as they are displayed in excursion sites and assignments will consist of creating a research photo-archive as well as recreating images using art techniques. Students must purchase art supplies either pre-travel or on site and must bring a digital camera. Taught in Italy (Winter) by Prof. Shan Ayers and Prof. Ian Hagarty.

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KIIS--Western Kentucky University / 1906 College Heights Blvd #11030 / Bowling Green, KY 42101-1030 / Tel. 270-745-4416 / Fax. 270-745-4413 / kiis@wku.edu / www.kiis.org