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 Courses are taught in English, unless noted.
 Courses are 3 credit hours each, unless noted.

Anthropology
ANTH 366 Topics: Art and Archaeology of Ancient Italy (3 hours)
This course will provide students with a survey of the major monuments of ancient Italy. Students will learn about the design and function of Etruscan and ancient Roman built spaces and the decorative and functional arts associated with them. From houses to cemeteries, temples to civic spaces, aqueducts to entertainment venues, students will consider the ways in which the constructed environment of ancient Italy conveyed messages of political propaganda and imperial consolidation. Students will also reflect on the ways in which later Europeans--including the Medici family of Florence--embraced these same monuments as foundations for their own ideas and cultures. Taught in Italy Winter by Prof. Kathleen Quinn .

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Art
ART 491 Topics: Maya Mexico, Past & Present (3 hours)
Open to Honors and non-Honors students with a 3.2 GPA and above, this course may be taken for credit in any of the following disciplines: Art (art history or studio), Education, Economics, or Honors. The course examines Maya society and culture in the historical past and living present. We visit archeological sites and learn about ancient Maya social systems, religious beliefs, artistic achievements and cultural practices. We also consider the modern Maya in urban and rural settings. Students contend with the contemporary dynamics of regional and national identity, tourism and economic development. We employ the "Place as Text" teaching methodology, which inserts students into social environments and fosters close observation of the local culture. Students are required to give oral reports, complete the course workbook, and record their observations in photography and video. The course is team-taught by three professors who bring their disciplinary perspectives to bear on common questions and concerns. In addition to acquiring knowledge of Maya society and culture, students learn to work effectively in small groups, improve their oral presentation and analytical skills, and develop a heightened sense of confidence and leadership. Team taught in Maya Mexico by Dr. Christopher Fulton, Dr. Marie Petkus, and Prof. Alan Mills

ART 491 Topics: Italian Decorative Art and Design (3 hours)
Like magicians with art materials, artists & designers have long used visual tricks to fool the viewer's eye. Solid stone statues appear to breathe air and capture the essence of energetic movement. Flat paintings seem like they open into another dimension or are rendered so realistically that they tempt the senses. For this course students will examine the history, purpose, and application of illusionistic deception in Italian art and design through countless visits to museums, churches, galleries and historic sites. We will investigate, emulate and photograph images as they are displayed in excursion sites. Assignments will consist of creating a research photo-archive, as well as attempting to recreate images using basic art techniques. A digital camera is required (some camera phones will work fine) and students must purchase art materials either prior to departure or upon arrival in Italy. This art course is open to all majors and there are no prerequisites in order to enroll. Taught in Italy Winter by Prof. Ian Hagarty .

ART 496: Topics: Photography of the Mayan World (3 hours)
Students take photographs in cities, towns, the countryside and at archeological sites. Special attention is given to human subjects in social environments (e.g. schools, markets, city streets, at work in industry or agriculture). Students learn to use a digital SLR camera and imaging software, preferably Adobe Photoshop. Those enrolled in the course must bring a laptop equipped with imaging software. This course will be given within the context of the team-taught course "Maya Mexico: Past and Present." Taught in Maya Mexico by Prof. Alan Mills

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Business Administration
BA 420 /592 Topics: Business Analysis for Management (3 hours)
This course offers students the opportunity to study the ways in which leadership and strategic management varies depending on culture and context. This trip is a unique educational experience for students and professionals, visiting East Africa and specifically Tanzania and Zanzibar, the semi-autonomous part of Tanzania. Students tour local enterprises and interact with leaders, entrepreneurs and professionals in the fields of business and healthcare. Students examine the challenges in applying modern, domestic concepts of leadership theory and strategic management in the African culture. Identification of problems, generation of alternatives, and the implementation of effective business and corporate strategies are emphasized. At the conclusion of this course, participants will have an understanding of the impact of the African culture and specifically the unique environment of Tanzania and Zanzibar has had on various aspects of leadership and strategic management. Taught in Zanzibar Winter by Dr. Michail Trivizadakis.

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Chemistry
CHEM 101 Introduction to Chemistry: Chemistry and Art in Italy (3 hours)
This course is designed for non-science and science majors, though welcomes students of science. We will introduce students to some basic chemistry related with art. Daily activities will consist of field trips to art galleries, museums and a restoration laboratory, geographical features, and a "hand on" experience painting a fresco. Our attention centers on Florence and Rome, in coordination with the program itinerary. In lectures and discussions we will examine some basic principles of light, color, and chemistry. These principles will be used to investigate artists' materials including pigments, dyes, solvents, and native metals used during the Italian Renaissance. Following this introduction, causes of deterioration will be explored. Scientific methods to analyze works of art including microscopic analysis and techniques using X-rays, ultraviolet, and infrared light will be introduced. Finally, conservation and restoration topics will be addressed with particular focus on paintings in Rome. Required readings include art restoration and primary Renaissance sources. Through discussions and written assignments, students will develop critical thinking skills. Taught in Italy Winter by Dr. Rosalynn Quinones.

BIO /CHEM Topics: Chemistry of Beer and Wine (3 hours)
Students in this interdisciplinary, English-language course will learn the basic science behind the fermentation techniques that have been used in Europe for thousands of years to make beer and wine, beverages that are iconically linked to German and French culture. Students will learn about the fundamental ingredients and processes through which sugar solutions are converted into alcoholic beverages, the microorganisms completing the transformations, and processes occurring afterwards that convert the new beverages into the mature ones that are well-known internationally. Along with the science of fermentation and learning how these processes happen in such culturally rich environments, students will also learn about the history of beer in Germany and wine in France and what roles these beverages play in contemporary culture. Taught in Paris-Munich Winter by Dr. Matthew Saderholm.

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Economics
ECON 410 Topics: Maya Mexico, Past & Present (3 hours)
Open to Honors and non-Honors students with a 3.2 GPA and above, this course may be taken for credit in any of the following disciplines: Art (art history or studio), Education, Economics, or Honors. The course examines Maya society and culture in the historical past and living present. We visit archeological sites and learn about ancient Maya social systems, religious beliefs, artistic achievements and cultural practices. We also consider the modern Maya in urban and rural settings. Students contend with the contemporary dynamics of regional and national identity, tourism and economic development. We employ the "Place as Text" teaching methodology, which inserts students into social environments and fosters close observation of the local culture. Students are required to give oral reports, complete the course workbook, and record their observations in photography and video. The course is team-taught by three professors who bring their disciplinary perspectives to bear on common questions and concerns. In addition to acquiring knowledge of Maya society and culture, students learn to work effectively in small groups, improve their oral presentation and analytical skills, and develop a heightened sense of confidence and leadership. Team taught in Maya Mexico by Dr. Christopher Fulton, Dr. Marie Petkus, and Prof. Alan Mills

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Education
EDU 400 Topics: Maya Mexico, Past & Present (3 hours)
Open to Honors and non-Honors students with a 3.2 GPA and above, this course may be taken for credit in any of the following disciplines: Art (art history or studio), Education, Economics, or Honors. The course examines Maya society and culture in the historical past and living present. We visit archeological sites and learn about ancient Maya social systems, religious beliefs, artistic achievements and cultural practices. We also consider the modern Maya in urban and rural settings. Students contend with the contemporary dynamics of regional and national identity, tourism and economic development. We employ the "Place as Text" teaching methodology, which inserts students into social environments and fosters close observation of the local culture. Students are required to give oral reports, complete the course workbook, and record their observations in photography and video. The course is team-taught by three professors who bring their disciplinary perspectives to bear on common questions and concerns. In addition to acquiring knowledge of Maya society and culture, students learn to work effectively in small groups, improve their oral presentation and analytical skills, and develop a heightened sense of confidence and leadership. Team taught in Maya Mexico by Dr. Christopher Fulton, Dr. Marie Petkus, and Prof. Alan Mills

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English
ENG 349 Topics: A Moveable Feast: Food, Culture, and Travel Writing (3 hours)
This course will explore connections between the tradition of travel writing and the gastronomic cultures of Germany and France, as reflected in the cities of Munich and Paris. Readings will include various travel essays and blogs about these locales, discussions of their respective food cultures, and pieces on the craft of travel writing and blogging. Excursions will concern the food heritage and culture of these cities (e.g., markets, bakeries, restaurants), as well as other sites of historical and cultural interest, and students will write several journal entries or blog posts on these experiences. Students will also do a researched presentation to their classmates about the significance of a food-related site in either city, utilizing a Place as Text approach, and a final essay will provide synthesis and reflection on their experiences with the food culture of these locales and how these experiences compare and contrast with American food culture. Taught in Paris-Munich Winter by Dr. Charlotte Rich.

ENG 396 Mythology / RELS 399 Topics: Ancient Myth in Context (3 hours)
Myth: Much like modern America, Rome was a melting pot of cultural influences: they had native gods and myths of their own, they adopted Greek gods and mythology more or less wholesale, and they even imported gods and myths from the peoples they conquered. This course will survey many of the gods and myths that filled the ancient Roman mental landscape while introducing students to the history and culture of ancient Rome and Italy. Especially in Florence, it will also show the lasting influence of Greek and Roman mythology on the great works of Renaissance art. Taught in Italy by Dr. Richard King.

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Health Care Administration/Public Health
HCA 347/ HCA 572: Special Topics: Comparative Health Systems (3 hours)
This course is designed to offer executive students in MHA/MPA majors with knowledge and administrative experience of the Tanzanian healthcare system. In collaboration with the ministry of health (MOH) and its affiliates, the students will learn about the structure of the Tanzanian system in terms of financing, access and distribution of human resources and the growing role of the private sector in healthcare delivery. Collaborative and applied learning environments will be created where students will be teamed up with their Tanzanian counterparts in roundtable discussions and site visits to learn, compare and share experiences in health care. Field visits to Mnazi Mmoja Hospital (the largest public hospital in Zanzibar) and internationally funded health care projects will be made to facilitate assessment of care delivery and management practices. Taught in Executives in Zanzibar (Winter) by Dr. William Mkanta..

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History
HIST 490 Topics: Day to Day in Ancient Italy (3 hours)
What did the ancients wear? eat? hate? love? How did they spend their days and nights? How did they survive without the car, movies, texting? How did they make their money? What did they think about the good life, death, politics, sex? Why do we care? This course explores the ordinary lives of ancient Romans- and of the Italians, Greeks, Jews, and Christians who lived near them- as we wander their towns and poke our noses into what remains of their homes, temples, stores, streets. Taught in Italy Winter by Dr. Chris Shea.

HIST 490 Topics: Classical and Medieval Urban Planning in Italy (3 hours)
This course will concentrate on the development of the urban environment from the Roman Republic to the Florentine Republic, with particular attention to how the shaping of public space contributed to the formation of civic identity. Guided site visits will allow students to reconstruct an informed (if approximate) experience; these will be supplemented by primary source readings (e.g., quasi-theoretical texts like Frontinus, passages from contemporaries describing environs and buildings, and inscriptions). Taught in Italy Winter by Dr. Francis Russell.

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Honors
HON 300 Colloquium: Maya Mexico, Past & Present (3 hours)
Open to Honors and non-Honors students with a 3.2 GPA and above, this course may be taken for credit in any of the following disciplines: Art (art history or studio), Education, Economics, or Honors. The course examines Maya society and culture in the historical past and living present. We visit archeological sites and learn about ancient Maya social systems, religious beliefs, artistic achievements and cultural practices. We also consider the modern Maya in urban and rural settings. Students contend with the contemporary dynamics of regional and national identity, tourism and economic development. We employ the "Place as Text" teaching methodology, which inserts students into social environments and fosters close observation of the local culture. Students are required to give oral reports, complete the course workbook, and record their observations in photography and video. The course is team-taught by three professors who bring their disciplinary perspectives to bear on common questions and concerns. In addition to acquiring knowledge of Maya society and culture, students learn to work effectively in small groups, improve their oral presentation and analytical skills, and develop a heightened sense of confidence and leadership. Team taught in Maya Mexico by Dr. Christopher Fulton, Dr. Marie Petkus, and Prof. Alan Mills

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Interdisciplinary Studies
IDST 350 Topics: Cuisine and Culture in Paris & Munich (3 hours)
This interdisciplinary, English-language course will not only demonstrate how food is an integral part of France and Germany while showcasing their respective cultures, it will also contextualize American eating habits, gastronomic traditions, and the current trends that are shaping the food scene in the United States. At the most basic level, students will become more aware of similarities and differences between American and European culture; at a deeper level they will examine how American eating habits have been influenced by the immigrant experience and pivotal world events such as war, natural disaster, financial boom, and economic depression. Participants in such a program will also have the chance to explore global topics that include social justice, sustainability, famine, waste, food literacy, genetically modified organisms, the rise of the fast food nation, and the slow food movement. In learning about the food and traditions of these two countries in the heart of Europe, students will also gain a deeper comprehension of European culture in general while at the same time coming to better understand the modern and historical foods of the United States. Although topic-specific readings, in-class assignments, and research-centered projects will provide the framework for an integral portion of such a course, the bulk of student learning will arise from experiential knowledge gained from guided tours, hands-on activities, directed excursions, and site visits in the host countries. Team taught in Paris-Munich Winter by Prof. Eddy Cuisinier and Prof. David Dominé.

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Religious Studies
RELS 399 /ENG 396 Topics: Ancient Myth in Context (3 hours)
Myth: Much like modern America, Rome was a melting pot of cultural influences: they had native gods and myths of their own, they adopted Greek gods and mythology more or less wholesale, and they even imported gods and myths from the peoples they conquered. This course will survey many of the gods and myths that filled the ancient Roman mental landscape while introducing students to the history and culture of ancient Rome and Italy. Especially in Florence, it will also show the lasting influence of Greek and Roman mythology on the great works of Renaissance art. Taught in Italy Winter by Dr. Richard King.

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KIIS--Western Kentucky University / 1906 College Heights Blvd #11030 / Bowling Green, KY 42101-1030 / Tel. 270-745-4416 / Fax. 270-745-4413 / kiis@wku.edu / www.kiis.org